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Some Scientists Criticize Media Coverage of Cellphone Study
USA Created: 31 May 2016
Experts on cellphone and brain tumor science say they're disappointed some media outlets downplayed last week's government study that found a small but significant percentage of rats exposed to lifelong cellphone radiation developed cancerous or precancerous cells.

The $25 million study from the National Toxicology Program prompted a skeptical New York Times video, saying overall brain tumor rates have not skyrocketed along with cellphone use.

But Louis Slesin, editor of Microwave News, notes a major Times shareholder is a global wireless magnate.

He points to a USC report that said the same types of tumors rats developed in this study have increased in humans. Slesin says he's glad to see other influential groups changing their stance.

"The American Cancer Society and Consumer Reports, which have been deeply skeptical for the last 15 years, have done a 180," he says. "And now, they're saying that this is a paradigm shift that needs to be taken seriously, and we need to do more."

Slesin recommends people moderate their cellphone use, use earbuds, store cellphones away from their bodies and limit children's access to wireless devices.

L. Lloyd Morgan, a research fellow with the nonprofit Environmental Health Trust, says cellphone companies could issue warnings, or make the phones safer - but won't, because that could trigger consumer lawsuits.

"If you recognize there's a hazard, you have immediate liability for that," says Morgan. "So, they refuse to admit there's a problem. In fact, they continue to say there's absolutely no evidence."

Dr. Joel Moskowitz, director for University of California-Berkeley, thinks the government should issue clear warnings about cellphone use and revise current regulations, which are only based on the risk of overheating and not other known effects of radiation.

"We need to carefully review the current limit on what a cellphone or cellphone tower is allowed to emit," says Moskowitz. "And we need to develop safer guidelines or standards. We should also be encouraging industry to develop technology that uses less radiation."

CTIA, the wireless industry association, has said it's reviewing the study and emphasized previous studies that showed no established health effects from radio-frequency signals used in cellphones.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Public News Service, Suzanne Potter, 31 May 2016

How Do Animals Keep from Getting Lost?
USA Created: 31 May 2016
Every three years, the Royal Institute of Navigation organizes a conference focussed solely on animals. This April, the event was held southwest of London, at Royal Holloway College, whose ornate Victorian-era campus has appeared in “Downton Abbey.” For several days, the world’s foremost animal-navigation researchers presented their data and findings in a small amphitheatre. Most of the talks dealt with magnetoreception—the ability to sense Earth’s weak but ever-present magnetic field—in organisms as varied as mice, salmon, pigeons, frogs, and cockroaches. This marked a change from previous years, Richard Nissen, a member of the Institute, told me, when a range of other navigation aids were part of the discussion: landmarks, olfactory cues, memory, genetics, polarized light, celestial objects. “Everyone now seems completely sold on the idea that animal navigation is based on magnetism,” Nissen said. Human-centric as it sounds, most of the conference’s attendees believe that animals possess a kind of compass.

Scientists have sought for centuries to explain how animals, particularly migratory species, find their way with awesome precision across the globe. Examples of these powers abound. Bar-tailed godwits depart from the coastal mudflats of northern Alaska in autumn and set out across the Pacific Ocean, flying for eight days and nights over featureless water before arriving in New Zealand, seven thousand miles away. If the birds misjudge their direction by even a few degrees, they can miss their target. Arctic terns travel about forty thousand miles each year, from the Arctic to the Antarctic and back again. And odysseys of this sort are not limited to the feathered tribes. Some leatherback turtles leave the coast of Indonesia and swim to California, more than eight thousand miles away, then return to the very beaches where they hatched. Dragonflies and monarch butterflies follow routes so long that they die along the way; their great-grandchildren complete the journey.

Although the notion of a biocompass was widely disparaged in the first half of the twentieth century, the evidence in favor of it has since become quite strong. In the early nineteen-sixties, a German graduate student named Wolfgang Wiltschko began conducting experiments with European robins, which he thought might find their way by picking up radio waves that emanated from the stars. Instead, Wiltschko discovered that if he put the robins in cages equipped with a Helmholtz coil—a device for creating a uniform magnetic field—the birds would change their orientation when he switched the direction of north. By the start of this century, seventeen other species of migratory bird, as well as honeybees, sharks, skates, rays, snails, and cave salamanders, had been shown to possess a magnetic sense. In fact, practically every animal studied by scientists today demonstrates some capacity to read the geomagnetic field. Red foxes almost always pounce on mice from the northeast. Carp floating in tubs at fish markets in Prague spontaneously align themselves in a north-south axis. So do dogs when they crouch to relieve themselves, and horses, cattle, and deer when they graze—except if they are under high-voltage power lines, which have a disruptive influence.

The only problem is that no one can seem to locate the compass. “We are still crying out for how do they do this,” Joseph Kirschvink, a geobiologist at the California Institute of Technology, said. “It’s a needle in the haystack.” Kirschvink meant this almost literally. In 1981, as a Ph.D. student at Princeton University, he proposed that magnetite, a naturally occurring oxide of iron that he had found in honeybees and homing pigeons, was the basis of the biocompass. Even a handful of magnetite crystals, he wrote at the time, could do the trick. “One equivalent of a magnetic bacteria can give a whale a compass—one cell,” he told me. “Good luck finding it.” Even in animals smaller than a whale, this is no easy task. Throughout the two-thousands, researchers pointed to the presence of iron particles in the olfactory cells of rainbow trout, the brains of mole rats, and the upper beaks of homing pigeons. But when scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, in Vienna, took a closer look, slicing and examining the beaks of hundreds of pigeons, they found that the iron-rich cells were likely the product of an immune response—nothing to do with the biocompass. The study’s lead researcher, David Keays, has since turned his focus to iron-containing neurons inside the pigeons’ ears.

The search for the biocompass has extended to even smaller scales, too. In 1978, the German biophysicist Klaus Schulten proposed that birds’ innate sense of direction was chemical in nature. According to his theory, incoming light would hit some sort of sensory mechanism, which Schulten hadn’t yet pinpointed, and induce a transfer of electrons, triggering the creation of a radical pair—two molecules, each with an extra electron. The electrons, though slightly separated, would spin in synchrony. As the bird moved through the magnetic field, the orientation of the spinning electrons would be modulated, providing the animal with feedback about its direction. For the next twenty years, it remained unclear which molecules could be responsible for such a reaction. Then, in 2000, Schulten suggested an answer—cryptochromes, a newly discovered class of proteins that respond to blue light. Cryptochromes have since been found in the retinas of monarch butterflies, fruit flies, frogs, birds, and even humans. They are the only candidate so far with the right properties to satisfy Schulten’s theory. But the weakest magnetic field that affects cryptochromes in the laboratory is still twenty times stronger than Earth’s magnetic field. Peter Hore, a chemist at Oxford University, told me that establishing cryptochromes as the biocompass will require at least another five years of research.

At the conference, the magnetite and cryptochrome researchers made up distinct camps, each one quick to point out the opposing theory’s deficiencies. One person stood alone: Xie Can, a biophysicist at Peking University. Xie spent six years developing a kind of unified model of magnetic animal navigation. Last year, he published a paper in Nature Materials describing a protein complex that he dubbed MagR, which consists of iron crystals enveloped in a double helix of cryptochrome—the two main theories rolled into one. Xie has yet to win over other researchers, some of whom believe that his findings are the result of iron oxide contaminating his lab experiments. (Keays has said that he will eat his hat if MagR is proved to be the real magnetoreceptor.) But at the end of the conference, with one mystery of animal navigation after another left unanswered, Xie told me that he felt more confident than ever of his and his colleagues’ model. “If we are right, we can explain everything,” he said. Michael Walker, a biologist at the University of Auckland, was more circumspect. If history is any indication, he said, many of the current hypotheses about how the biocompass works will turn out to be wrong.

M. R. O’Connor is the author of “Resurrection Science: Conservation, De-Extinction, and the Precarious Future of Wild Things.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: The New Yorker, M. R. O’Connor , 28 May 2016

Letter: Frequent mobile phone use could be harmful
Rwanda Created: 30 May 2016
Editor,
RE: “Your concerns: Is frequent mobile phone use harmful?” (The New Times, May 23).

There is a huge amount of scientific evidence that low-level microwave radiation as emitted by mobile phones is extremely dangerous.

Mobile phones are being marketed extremely heavily in Africa, but we are not being given the same health warnings as they are in Europe... The UK Government guideline says no one under 16 should use mobiles except in emergencies, and under-8s should not use phones at all.

In Russia, the official government guideline (ignored by the nation’s youth) is that there should be no mobile use at all under the age of 18 years (this is true)—because, as you correctly say, the body’s immune system is still developing. The Russian guidelines also stress no mobile use for pregnant women. Guidelines across Scandinavia encourage citizens to not use a phone for more than 15 minutes to avoid brain damage.

When did you hear a similar warning being given in Africa?

A very recent study conducted by the US Government has found that this radiation is carcinogenic. This is a huge international health risk. And people living near towers are definitely at risk—nearly all the studies done on masts show health risks (23 out of 24 studies). And the one study from the UK that said there was no problem, clearly showed child leukemia rates rising the closer you got to a mast.

So really, it is 100% of mast studies show health problems.

Thanks again for the informative article.

Karl Muller
Click here to view the source article.
Source: The New Times, Karl Muller, 30 May 2016

Recording of NTP press conference released
USA Created: 28 May 2016
What:
The associate director of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) will provide an update and answer questions about a series of rodent studies on potential cancer risks from cell phone radiofrequency radiation.

(MV editors note: Play or download the recording at the source link below.)

NTP is releasing a report of its findings in rats. These findings are available at http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/05/26/055699. The report is titled, “Report of Partial Findings From the National Toxicology Program Carcinogenesis Studies of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation in Hsd: Sprague Dawley SD Rats (Whole Body Exposure).” Studies in mice are still underway.

NTP is an interagency program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services headquartered at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Who:

John Bucher, Ph.D.
Associate Director, National Toxicology Program (NTP)

Michael Wyde, Ph.D.
NTP Study Director
When:

Noon EDT, Friday, May 27, 2016
Where to call:

In the U.S. and Canada, call (785) 424-1059 or toll free at 800-895-1715
Outside the U.S. and Canada, call (785) 424-1059
Passcode/Conference ID: CELLPHONE
Click here to view the source article.
Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 27 May 2016

American Cancer Society responds to NTP cellphone/cancer study
USA Created: 28 May 2016
The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) has released partial results from an animal study of the effect of radiofrequency radiation associated with cell phones - The group found radiofrequency radiation was linked to a higher risk of two cancers. Below is a response from Otis W. Brawley, M.D., American Cancer Society Chief Medical Officer.

“For years, the understanding of the potential risk of radiation from cell phones has been hampered by a lack of good science. This report from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) is good science.

“The NTP report linking radiofrequency radiation (RFR) to two types of cancer marks a paradigm shift in our understanding of radiation and cancer risk. The findings are unexpected; we wouldn’t reasonably expect non-ionizing radiation to cause these tumors. This is a striking example of why serious study is so important in evaluating cancer risk. It’s interesting to note that early studies on the link between lung cancer and smoking had similar resistance, since theoretical arguments at the time suggested that there could not be a link.

“The new report covers only partial findings from the study, but importantly one of the two cancers linked to cell phone radiation was malignant gliomas in the brain. The association with gliomas and acoustic neuromas had been suspected from human epidemiology studies. The second cancer, called a schwannoma, is an extremely rare tumor in humans and animals, reducing the possibility that this is a chance finding. And importantly, the study found a ‘dose/response’ effect: the higher the dose, the larger the effect, a key sign that this association may be real.

“The fact that this finding was observed only in male rats has some wondering if the data is not reliable. It’s important to note that these sorts of gender differences often appear in carcinogenic studies, so the fact they show up here should not detract from the importance of the findings.

“This new evidence will undoubtedly factor into ongoing assessments by regulators to determine the potential cancer risk posed by cell phones. The American Cancer Society eagerly awaits guidance from government agencies, like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), about the safety of cell phone use.

“The NTP was given the difficult task of trying to answer important questions about the potential cancer risk posed by cell phones, and the group did not shirk from its responsibility. NTP staff were clearly aware of the potential importance of this study and went the extra distance to ensure the best science is used. They used double the number of animals required for this type of study; they convened not one but three panels to look at abnormal tissues from treated animals to ensure that what was identified as a brain and heart tumor was indeed a brain and heart tumor; they solicited review from multiple scientists from outside the NTP to critically review all aspects of the data analysis and study findings, to ensure the findings would stand up to the critical assessment expected once these unexpected findings were released.

“While this study adds significantly to the evidence that cell phone signals could potentially impact human health, it does not actually tell us how certain scenarios of cell phone use change our long-term risks of getting cancer. For example, the animal studies were performed at very high signal strengths, near but below levels that would cause animal tissue to heat up. Additional research will be needed to translate effects at these high doses to what might be expected at the much lower doses received by typical or even high-end cell phone users. Also, cell phone technology continues to evolve, and with each new generation, transmission strengths have declined and with it radio frequency exposures.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: ACS Press Room blog, Otis W. Brawley, M.D., 27 May 2016

NTP Draft Cellphone Radiation Cancer report released
USA Created: 27 May 2016
Report of Partial findings from the National Toxicology Program Carcinogenesis Studies of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation in Hsd: Sprague Dawley® SD rats (Whole Body Exposure).

Michael Wyde, Mark Cesta, Chad Blystone, Susan Elmore, Paul Foster, Michelle Hooth, Grace Kissling, David Malarkey, Robert Sills, Matthew Stout, View ORCID ProfileNigel Walker, Kristine Witt, Mary Wolfe, John Bucher
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/055699

Abstract

The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) has carried out extensive rodent toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at frequencies and modulations used in the US telecommunications industry. This report presents partial findings from these studies. The occurrences of two tumor types in male Harlan Sprague Dawley rats exposed to RFR, malignant gliomas in the brain and schwannomas of the heart, were considered of particular interest, and are the subject of this report. The findings in this report were reviewed by expert peer reviewers selected by the NTP and National Institutes of Health (NIH). These reviews and responses to comments are included as appendices to this report, and revisions to the current document have incorporated and addressed these comments. Supplemental information in the form of 4 additional manuscripts has or will soon be submitted for publication. These manuscripts describe in detail the designs and performance of the RFR exposure system, the dosimetry of RFR exposures in rats and mice, the results to a series of pilot studies establishing the ability of the animals to thermoregulate during RFR exposures, and studies of DNA damage. Capstick M, Kuster N, KĂĽhn S, Berdinas-Torres V, Wilson P, Ladbury J, Koepke G, McCormick D, Gauger J, Melnick R. A radio frequency radiation reverberation chamber exposure system for rodents Yijian G, Capstick M, McCormick D, Gauger J, Horn T, Wilson P, Melnick RL and Kuster N. Life time dosimetric assessment for mice and rats exposed to cell phone radiation Wyde ME, Horn TL, Capstick M, Ladbury J, Koepke G, Wilson P, Stout MD, Kuster N, Melnick R, Bucher JR, and McCormick D. Pilot studies of the National Toxicology Program's cell phone radiofrequency radiation reverberation chamber exposure system Smith-Roe SL, Wyde ME, Stout MD, Winters J, Hobbs CA, Shepard KG, Green A, Kissling GE, Tice RR, Bucher JR, Witt KL. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cell phone radiofrequency radiation in male and female rats and mice following subchronic exposure

Related news:
May 2016, USA: BREAKING: Cell Phone Radiation Boosts Cancer Rates in Animals - US Govt. expected to issue public warning
Click here to view the source article.
Source: BioRxiv, National Toxicology Program, 26 May 2016

BREAKING: Cell Phone Radiation Boosts Cancer Rates in Animals - US Govt. expected to issue public warning
USA Created: 25 May 2016
From Microwave News:
The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) is expected to issue a public announcement that cell phone radiation presents a cancer risk for humans. The move comes soon after its recently completed study showed statistically significant increases in cancer among rats that had been exposed to GSM or CDMA signals for two-years.

Discussions are currently underway among federal agencies on how to inform the public about the new findings. NTP senior managers believe that these results should be released as soon as possible because just about everyone is exposed to wireless radiation all the time and therefore everyone is potentially at risk.

To read our exclusive story, click here:
http://microwavenews.com/news-center/ntp-cancer-results
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Microwave News, Louis Slesin PhD., 25 May 2016

Three Ireland ordered to remove Dublin phone mast
Ireland Created: 20 May 2016
An Bord Pleanála has ordered that 3 Ireland remove a phone mast in Dublin’s Glasnevin area despite warnings by the company this would cause major service disruptions for customers in Dublin, Louth and Meath.

The 45m mast in the Dublin Industrial Estate facilitates mobile phone coverage and 2G, 3G and 4G internet services for 3 and Meteor customers in the area and farther afield.

Local residents wanted the structure removed due to its “visually obtrusive” nature and An Bord Pleanála has decided to refuse permission to retain the mast.

The planning body received 38 separate submissions on the case, mainly from residents of the nearby Claremont and The Willows housing estates who argued the mast is a “considerable eyesore” and “makes a poor impression on visitors to the estates”.

Site history

There has been a telecommunications presence on the site since 1977 when Esat Telecom erected a 20m mast, later replaced by the current one in 2003.

That structure was given renewed five-year planning permission for 12 antennas and 21 radio link dishes by An Bord Pleanála in 2010.

This was after Dublin City Council refused to grant permission in both 2003 and 2010.

Third-party appellants estimated anywhere between 65 and 150 houses in the two estates were “impacted with clear views of the imposing mast”, and the Claremont and The Willows Residents Mast Committee launched a petition for its removal, signed by 85 per cent of Claremont residents and 65 per cent of The Willows homeowners .

Antennas and satellites
The planning inspector also received submissions from local councillors Cieran Perry and Brendan Carr, former TD for the area Joe Costello and Fine Gael Minister Paschal Donohoe, all of whom called for the mast to be taken down.

Residents queried why 3 Ireland could not relocate the antennas and satellites to a 42 m structure operated by Vodafone, which is positioned more centrally within the industrial estate.

3 Ireland argued the site is “a vital transmission hub” and “failure to maintain this installation would result in an immediate and negative impact of coverage levels in Finglas, Glasnevin and the north Dublin, Louth and Meath areas”.

The mast also serves five commercial operators, including the Mater and Bar Council, and the firm said removal would affect the hospital and local businesses.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Irish Times, Ciarán D'Arcy, 20 May 2016

Does EHS originate from nocebo responses? Indications from a qualitative study
France Created: 14 May 2016
Abstract: Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance attributed to Electromagnetic Fields (IEI-EMF) is a condition in which symptoms are attributed to electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure.

As electro-hypersensitive (EHS) people have repeatedly been observed, during provocation trials, to report symptoms following perceived rather than actual exposure, the hypothesis has been put forward that IEI-EMF originates from psychological mechanisms, especially nocebo responses.

This paper examines this hypothesis, using data from a qualitative study aimed at understanding how EHS people come to regard themselves as such. Forty self-diagnosed EHS people were interviewed. A typified model of their attribution process was then elaborated, inductively, from their narratives. This model is linear and composed of seven stages: (1) onset of symptoms; (2) failure to find a solution; (3) discovery of EHS; (4) gathering of information about EHS; (5) implicit appearance of conviction; (6) experimentation; (7) conscious acceptance of conviction.

Overall, symptoms appear before subjects start questioning effects of EMF on their health, which is not consistent with the hypothesis that IEI-EMF originates from nocebo responses to perceived EMF exposure. However, such responses might occur at the sixth stage of the process, potentially reinforcing the attribution. It remains possible that some cases of IEI-EMF originate from other psychological mechanisms.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Bioelectromagnetics, Dieudonné M, 01 Jan 2016

Skolans svar pĂĄ mobilstöket – har infört ”mobilhotell”
Norway Created: 14 May 2016
En högstadieskola i Norge har infört mobilförbud under skoldagen. Varje morgon tvingas eleverna lägga sina telefoner i ett ”mobilhotell”.

– MĂĄnga av eleverna tycker att det är skönt att de slipper vara inloggade pĂĄ sociala medier hela tiden, säger skolans rektor till norska Dagbladet.

Ă…l Ungdomsskole i Norge har sedan ĂĄrskiftet infört en mobilfri skola. Varje klassrum har installerat ”mobilhotell” – där barnen fĂĄr lägga ifrĂĄn sig sina telefoner.

– Förut var det skärmar överallt pĂĄ rasten och de tog all uppmärksamhet hos eleverna. Men nu blir de nästan tvungna att prata med varandra, säger Mari Halde Andersson som är lärare pĂĄ skolan, till norska Dagbladet.
Eleverna positiva

Först väckte initiativet motstånd hos högstadieeleverna, men nu ska attityderna ha ändrats.

– Mitt intryck är att mĂĄnga av eleverna tycker att det är skönt att de slipper vara inloggade pĂĄ sociala medier hela tiden, säger skolans rektor Anne Marie Stokkedal.

Mobilförbudet ska ha kommit pĂĄ tal efter att eleverna bland annat känt obehag inför att äta mat i skolmatsalen – av rädsla för att bli fotograferade.
Hyllas av norska föräldrar

Det är inte bara skolans personal som gillar mobilhotellet – tilltaget har även hyllats av föräldrar.

"Borde vara en självklarhet på alla skolor", skriver en förälder på Dagbladets Facebooksida.

Själva "hotellet" består av en trälåda där varje mobil har ett eget fack.

– För studenterna är det viktigt att telefonerna förvaras säkert, säger rektorn till Dagbladet.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Aftonbladet, 06 Feb 2016

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