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Cell phone usage and erectile function
Austria Created: 28 Mar 2014
Introduction: The objective of this pilot study was to report our experience concerning the effects of cell phone usage on erectile function (EF) in men.

Material and Methods:
We recruited 20 consecutive men complaining of erectile dysfunction (ED) for at least six months (Group A), and another group of 10 healthy men with no complaints of ED (Group B). Anamnesis, basic laboratory investigations, and clinical examinations were performed. All men completed the German version of the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) for evaluation of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), as well as another questionnaire designed by our clinicians that assessed cell phone usage habits.

Results:
There was no significant difference between both groups regarding age, weight, height, and total testosterone (Table 1). The SHIM scores of Group A were significantly lower than that of Group B, 11.2 ±5 and 24.2 ±2.3, respectively. Total time spent talking on the cell phone per week was not significantly higher in Group A over B, 17.6 ±11.1 vs. 12.5 ±7 hours. Men with ED were found to carry their ‘switched on’ cell phones for a significantly longer time than those without ED, 4.4 ±3.6 vs. 1.8 ±1 hours per day.

Conclusions.
We found a potential correlation with cell phone usage and a negative impact on EF. Further large–scale studies confirming our initial data and exploring the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are recommended.
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Source: Cent European J Urol. 2013, Badereddin et al, 26 Apr 2013

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