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Farmers face threat from campaign to slash mobile mast rents. Comment below!
United Kingdom Created: 13 Apr 2015
Farmers face threat from campaign to slash mobile mast rents
Mobile operators mount campaign to be treated like utilities, paying £240 rather than £7,500 per year
Farmers face a threat to hundreds of millions of pounds in extra income rom their land, as mobile operators mount a campaign to slash the rent they pay for mast sites.

A coalition of all four of Britain’s mobile operators – EE, O2, Three and Vodafone – is urging the Government to intervene to give them the similar rights to energy and water companies to build out their networks.

According to a report commissioned by the operators from Deloitte and seen by The Telegraph it could mean the average annual rent for a rural mobile mast plummet Urban landlords could also take a big hit if the mobile industry gets its way. They charge an average of £9,200.

It would mean total savings for the mobile operators of up to £271m, according to Deloitte.

Such a collapse would come as a heavy blow to many farmers and other landowners who rely on payments from mobile operators to supplement the main income. Many have already seen the payments dwindle in recent years following the 2010 merger of Orange and T-Mobile and deals between competing operators to share masts. Farmers are also struggling as a result of tumbling commodities prices.

The operators nevertheless argue the charges they face are unfair compared with utilities companies, given mobile coverage is increasingly seen as an essential utility.

Last year the Government applied heavy pressure to extract an agreement from each operator to cover at least 90pc of Britain’s landmass by 2017. The proportion of land where all four rivals provide a signal is also due to increase, from 69pc to 85pc.

The deal with Government requires new masts to be built in far-flung locations where the investment was previously judged unjustified because few customers would use them. ing from £7,500 to less than £240. Many farms host more than one mast.

Urban landlords could also take a big hit if the mobile industry gets its way. They charge an average of £9,200.

It would mean total savings for the mobile operators of up to £271m, according to Deloitte.

Such a collapse would come as a heavy blow to many farmers and other landowners who rely on payments from mobile operators to supplement the main income. Many have already seen the payments dwindle in recent years following the 2010 merger of Orange and T-Mobile and deals between competing operators to share masts. Farmers are also struggling as a result of tumbling commodities prices.

The operators nevertheless argue the charges they face are unfair compared with utilities companies, given mobile coverage is increasingly seen as an essential utility.

The Wireless Industry Is NOT a Utility! And Will Never Be ONE.
Anyone can easily live without it.
It does mankind Loads of Harm, I have still to find the GOODS!
So, Utility, No Way.!
They are PRIVATE COMPANIES ONLY IN IT FOR THE AMBLE PROFIT, with Shareholders, who want results, in the form of cash every year.

But: Please read the whole article at link:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/mediatechnologyandtelecoms/telecoms/11488548/Farmers-face-threat-from-campaign-to-slash-mobile-mast-rents.html
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Agnes Ingvarsdottir

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