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Phone mast blunder shock for scared mum
United Kingdom Created: 7 Feb 2007
A MUM of three has spoken of her shock at discovering plans are under way to build a 20-metre tall mobile phone mast next door to her home.

Fleur Bateman was completely unaware of the proposal until she saw her house listed in a planning application printed in the News.

She is now terrified the mast could pose a serious danger to the health of her children said she is prepared to leave her house and make herself homeless rather than live next to the mast.

She is also scared her job as a childminder could end if worried parents withdraw their youngsters from her care.

Sobbing, she said: "I feel very scared. I watched my best friend die of leukaemia. I'm so terrified about this going through, and I've been told there's a good chance it will do. If I stay here for another 15 years, which of my children could be dead by then? There is no way I can allow this to happen."

Fleur, 38, is also fuming that Huntingdonshire District Council did not write to tell her of the proposals before details were released to the press, despite her house - The Whitehouse in Great Paxton - being named in the planning application as a reference point for the mast.

She said: "Nobody let us know, I've got children and this mast is going to be radiating straight into their bedrooms. Everyone I spoke to at the school was appalled."

Fleur contacted the council on Thursday to ask why neither she, nor her mother who runs the Whitehouse Cottage Guest House next door, had received a letter, and was told it was an administrative oversight. The next day a letter arrived for both her and her mother, who is currently seriously ill in hospital.

Fleur is now trying to form a protest group - but the failure of the district council to get in touch sooner has given her less than three weeks to get organised.

Villagers, also shocked by the news, are rallying to oppose the plans and are expected to pack a parish council meeting, where the proposals will be discussed on Monday, February 12. Fleur has also sent out 400 leaflets to people in Great Paxton, and said she has been flooded with calls of support since doing so.

A district council spokesperson said the council had been unaware there were two separate Whitehouse properties, and this had caused confusion.

Mobile phone giants T-mobile, which plans to put up the 20-metre monopole, said the health of its customers was paramount and it would continue to carry out tests and review research into whether masts are harmful to people's health.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Cambridge Evening News, 06 Feb 2007

Carrott to take mast fight to Commons
United Kingdom Created: 4 Feb 2007
He is one of the Midlands funniest and richest men - Yet he doesn't own a microwave on health grounds.
Now, Jasper Carrott is prepared to be labelled a nimby after a "connections box" put up at the end of his garden turned out to be a 50ft rail telecommunications mast.

Next month, Carrott who said the Network Rail mast had been erected without the knowledge of residents – will head to Westminster to meet MPs and scientists to find out more about the potential dangers of the structures.
The masts, which are being rolled out across the country's railway network to provide better coverage between drivers and signallers, are in response to averting another Ladbroke Grove accident. They do not require any planning permission.
Carrott, who lives in Darley Green, near Dorridge, Solihull, said: "I'm in the same position as everyone else who finds a huge mast at the bottom of their garden.

"I don't know how dangerous they are or if they are at all. I'm not a scientist, I can only read and try and find out. But there are 2,200 going up around the country and no one seems to know anything about them."
The mast was erected to the north of Chessetts Wood Road towards the end of last year. In October Carrott, who made his debut in The Birmingham Post rich list this month at number 48 with an estimated £50 million fortune, received a letter from Network Rail contractors asking if they could use his land to install a "connections box".
Despite assurances they would leave the land secured, contractors repeatedly left gates open, he claimed. On the third occasion, the family asked the contractors to leave.
"Before they left they told us they would have been gone by the next day anyway because the mast would be up by then," he said. "It was the first we knew about it.
"We were concerned firstly because of having a 50ft mast at the bottom of the garden and secondly because of the ramifications of radiation being pulsed out 24 hours a day.
"I've always been aware of effects of radiation, we've never had a microwave for example, and the danger from electrical pylons, but all this takes time to filter into into public consciousness."
When he "delved deeper" on the internet, he found substantial amount of research claiming to link phone mast radiation with damage to health, including cancers.
"When I found out these masts had to be every four miles, I thought, what's going on?" he said. "No one knows about them until they've gone up.
"If you talk to Network Rail they say they are very open about the process. But it has only been when I've insisted that they've informed everyone around me.
"The local council is powerless," he added. "But if you put a 13-foot pair of metal gates on your drive for security, the council is down on you like a ton of bricks."
Carrott feels so strongly he plans to travel to London for the meeting on February 22, to hear renowned US scientist Dr George Carlo address MPs and Sir William Stewart, UK Health Protection Agency chairman.
"Everyone should be concerned as to the possible dangers but the general feeling is, 'it's all being done and it's all safe'," he said. "What do I know? I'm a comic from Birmingham. But I'm on the receiving end of one of these masts and I need to know more for my own peace of mind."
A spokesman for Network Rail said they had contacted Warwick District Council before building the mast.
"After he (Mr Carrott) raised concerns about a site near Dorridge we stopped work and examined the possibility of moving it. Any move could only take it closer to people's home so we therefore continued construction but first we wrote twice to local residents."
Caroline Spelman MP (Con Meriden) has been battling for the law to be changed to require Network Rail to seek planning permission for their masts.
"It is currently is very harsh on residents who can find their homes blighted by masts being put up behind their property without warning," she said.
Jasper wrote to Network Rail to find out where sites of the masts along the Snow Hill to Leamington were planned. They are as follows
* Snow Hill Station: Network Rail is in consultation with the city council on where an appropriate site might be
* Small Heath: mast not built yet but site earmarked on Anderton Road. No residential buildings close by
* Solihull: south of Princes Wayon, not built yet
* Dorridge: built, to the North of Chessetts Wood Road
* Lapworth: built, to the north of Dicks Lane, Rowington. It was relocated after complaints from neighbours
* Leamington Spa: not built, sited close to the station car park. It was moved to ensure it was further away from homes and the height of the mast was cut by 10 metres
Completion of all these masts will take place by April, and Network Rail said the total could rise to eight or nine
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Birmingham Post, Emma Pinch, 31 Jan 2007

Phone mast is no laughing matter for comic
United Kingdom Created: 4 Feb 2007
MIDLAND funnyman Jasper Carrott is worried after a huge rail telecoms mast was put up at the bottom of his garden near Solihull.
Carrott, one of the area's richest men, is to meet MPs and scientists at Westminster over the 50ft mast at Darley Green, Dorridge, to find out more about the potential dangers of the structures.
Carrott said the Network Rail mast had been erected without the knowledge of residents.
The masts are being rolled out across the rail network to provide better communication between train drivers and signallers and to avert another Ladbroke Grove-type accident. They do not require planning permission.
Carrott said: "I'm in the same position as everyone else who finds a huge mast at the bottom of their garden.
"I don't know how dangerous they are or if they are at all. I'm not a scientist, I can only read and try to find out. But there are 2,200 going up around the country and no one seems to know anything about them."
The mast was erected to the north of Chessetts Wood Road towards the end of last year.
In October Carrott, who has an estimated £50 million fortune, received a letter from Network Rail contractors asking if they could use his land to install a "connections box".
"We were concerned firstly because of having a 50ft mast at the bottom of the garden - and secondly because of the ramifications of radiation being pulsed out 24 hours a day.
"I've always been aware of effects of radiation - we've never had a microwave at home, for example - and the danger from electrical pylons, but all this takes time to filter into into public consciousness."
When the comedian delved deeper on the internet, he found substantial research claiming to link phone mast radiation with damage to health, including cancers.
"When I found out these masts had to be every four miles, I thought, what's going on?" he said. "No-one knows about them until they've gone up.
"Network Rail they say they are very open about the process. But it has only been when I've insisted that they've informed everyone around me.
"The local council is powerless," he added.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Agnes Ingvarsdottir from Birmingham Mail 310107

Birmingham City: NOW A NO-GO Zone For Thousands of British People: The start of a wireless city
United Kingdom Created: 3 Feb 2007
Work has started to install the first aerials as part of BT and Birmingham City Council's pioneering 'Wireless City' network.
Over the next few weeks the aerials will be fitted to lamposts in the city centre in time for the spring launch of the innovative wireless project.
The Wireless Birmingham Wi-Fi network will cover a square mile area of the city centre.
BT will fund the city centre network, with the city council providing access to its street lamp posts in order to create the essential infrastructure.
In a groundbreaking innovation, people with laptops, mobile phones, hand-held computers and gaming devices using Wi-Fi – the industry standard for connecting devices wirelessly to the web – will be able to access information and services from the city council free of charge through an internet portal.
The portal will give free access over the network to Birmingham-specific information relating to topics such as health, transport, events, and schools, whilst people are out and about in the city centre.
It will also enable the council to provide free wireless access to educational information anywhere within the city centre, including the city’s 50,000 higher education students, using the same technology they are familiar with as it is already installed in many schools and colleges.
As well as the free services, people will be able to buy vouchers or subscribe to innovative services such as BT Openzone and Fusion, and a range of new applications and services for consumers and businesses, allowing them to remain contactable, access broadband wirelessly and surf the web while on the move.
These could include mobile office devices for Birmingham street wardens, visitors and business owners of Birmingham; and Wireless CCTV, which will be used for city centre management, security and parking services. On successful completion of a pilot, it is the intention of both parties to formalise an agreement for the future running of the service.
The initial coverage area will be the professional district, the ICC, NIA and Brindleyplace, Broad Street, the Jewellery Quarter, Eastside, Digbeth, and the main retail areas.
Aston Science Park and Millennium Point are also to have coverage.
The development and operational costs of the network will be borne entirely by BT, which also says that there is no cost burden on the taxpayer for the provision and management of the network.
Source: By Steve Pain, Technology Editor Birmingham Post

Campaigners delighted as phone mast vanishes
United Kingdom Created: 2 Feb 2007
PHONE mast campaigners are finally claiming victory after mobile company workers turned up to remove the pole blighting their lives.

The O2 phone mast was removed from Akers Way yesterday morning after a two-year battle.

Resident Karen Kelly, who lives in Manor Crescent with her husband, security guard Stephen, 48, son Morgan, 14, and daughter Summer, 10, said she was "ecstatic" to see the pole, which was a stone's throw from her home, come down.

"It's brilliant," housewife Mrs Kelly, 49, said. "I have been waiting nearly two years for this.

"Thanks to the Adver for all their help in the past.

"Also thanks for the tireless efforts of ex-councillor Derique Montaut and MP Michael Wills to get this mast removed.
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"It's the best news I've had in two years."

The phone mast went up in Akers Way in March 2005.

Ever since, residents of Manor Crescent have been concerned about possible health dangers from the communications pole.

Morgan suffers from alopecia, a condition that causes hair loss and can weaken the immune system, and Mrs Kelly had feared that the mast could have an effect on him.

"They started the groundwork on the mast even before the planning application was approved," Mrs Kelly said.

"It was placed just 45 metres from my home.

"They should not be placed in residential areas.

"We all thought we were being used in some biological experiment because nobody knows the effects of these masts.

"My biggest concern was my young son with autoimmune disease.

"I'm so happy to have thing gone from outside my house."

In July 2005, the Adver reported O2 had accepted an alternative site for the mast in Akers Way.

The group from Moredon had been left disappointed in May that year when Swindon Council's decision to find a new site for the O2 mast fell on deaf ears with the mobile phone company rejecting the spot.

But in July, a meeting between O2, then local councillor Derique Montaut and the council's principal planning officer proved successful.

The company will move the mast to the other side of Akers Way - 40m further away from the houses in Manor Crescent, which face on to it.

Mrs Kelly had rallied her neighbours to fight the mast, gathering a 300-strong petition.

James Stevenson, community relations officer for O2, said the firm had decided to compromise and put the mast 40 meters back, on the other side of the road.

But Mr Stevenson denied the mast, which went up in March, had been put in the wrong place originally.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: This is Wiltshire, Daniel Knowles, 1 Feb 2007

Pre-schools within 300m of phone mast bid site
United Kingdom Created: 2 Feb 2007
STRONG objections have been lodged against a proposed mobile phone mast less than 300 metres from seven Rustington nurseries, playchools and toddler groups.

Primary and secondary schools have to be consulted by mobile networks when masts are planned nearby, but it appears that none of the nurseries and other groups have been informed about the proposed site, at the junction of The Street and Woodlands Avenue.

Rustington Parish Council has highlighted the closeness of the pre-school facilities in a letter to Arun District Council, opposing the O2 mast.

Yesterday (Wednesday), Arun councillors were being recommended to object to the 15m tall structure, resembling a telegraph pole, on the grounds that it would be a "prominent and obtrusive feature".

Adrian Fielding, co-owner with his wife, Gemma, of the Early Bird Nursery School in Woodlands Avenue, which has 60 younger children on its books, said of the mast: "We don't want it there. It's completely the wrong place. If schools for older children are consulted about masts, then it should be the same for pre-schools, but we haven't been consulted."

And Sim Dendy, of Arun Community Church, which runs the Playcentre nursery in The Street, which takes 45 children, said the church was concerned about the proposed mast and would be finding out more information, with a view to writing to Arun.

In its objection, the parish council lists both pre-school facilities, along with Riverslea Nursery and Noah's Ark toddlers' group, both meeting in the parish church hall, The Street, and the Tiddlers, Mod Mums and Rascals groups, all based in the Methodist church hall in Claigmar Road.

The parish council also raised concerns that the mast would be close to a public seat and a café with outside seating, and the equipment cabinet for the mast could block drivers' views, making a highway hazard.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Littlehampton Today, 1 Feb 2007

IMPORTANT: Combating the dangers of wireless technology
United Kingdom Created: 2 Feb 2007
Combating the dangers of wireless technology "mobile phones, masts, wifi etc"
The EM Radiation Research Trust are pleased to announce that Dr George Carlo has agreed to visit to the UK to address MPs at Westminster on Thursday 22nd February, 2007
And to meet Sir William Stewart, UK Health Protection Agency Chairman
The meeting will be chaired by RRT Trustee - Dr Ian Gibson MP Committee Room 9 at Westminster, between 3 and 4pm on Thursday 22nd February, 2007
Please encourage your MPs to attend this important meeting. E-mail eileen@smokestackltd.co.uk to confirm attendance.
Please read the impressive summary biography on Dr George Carlo below.
Please advertise this on all websites and encourage everyone to lobby MPs to attend this extremely important meeting.
Kind Regards
Eileen O'Connor
Trustee - EM Radiation Research Trust
www.radiationresearch.org

Summary Biography
Dr. George L. Carlo
Science and Public Policy Institute
1101 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20004
202-756-7744
www.sppionline.org
www.safewireless.org
Dr. George L. Carlo is a world recognized medical scientist, author and lawyer, presently the Chairman of the non-profit Science and Public Policy Institute in Washington, D.C. His career spans thirty years and more than 150 medical, scientific and public policy publications in the areas of public
health, workplace safety and consumer protection. His most recent book, Cell Phones: Invisible Hazards in the Wireless Age, co-written with Washington syndicated columnist Martin Schram, is printed in seven languages and is the subject of a cinematic documentary due to be released in 2007.
Dr. Carlo and his public health related research have been featured on: ABC News 20/20, ABC's
World News Tonight, CBS Evening News, NBC's The Today Show, Good Morning America, CNBC,
MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, PBS, BBC, CBC, AM Canada and other radio and television shows throughout the world.
His work has been written about in: The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The London Daily Mirror, Newsweek, Time,
The Boston Globe, USA Today, The Toronto Star, The Toronto Globe and Mail, and various other publications around the world.
Dr. Carlo has been listed in Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in the East, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering, Who’s Who in Executives and Professionals, and Who’s Who in Medicine and Health Care. He has received various commendations and awards, and has served on a variety of federal
and state government commissions and advisory panels.
Dr. Carlo’s current focus is the Safe Wireless Initiative project, addressing the dangers of wireless technology and the implementation of appropriate corrective interventions. He has training in pathology, epidemiology, medical science and law, is a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology, and has served on the medical faculties of The George Washington University, the University of Arkansas and the State University of New York at Buffalo.
www.radiationresearch.org
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Eileen O'Connor. Trustee - EM Radiation Research Trust

Delight as 'eyesore' Lee mast is rejected
United Kingdom Created: 1 Feb 2007
A BID to build a towering mobile phone mast has been turned down, to the delight of residents.
The 12-metre-high pole, for the network 3, was to be located on the verge next to Portsmouth Road in Lee-on-the-Solent.

But planning permission was refused by Gosport Borough Council and now government inspectors have kicked out an appeal against the decision, saying the mast would be an eyesore.

Gareth Isaac, planning inspector, said: 'In my view, because of the height and position, the proposed new pole would be an unduly dominant feature in the context of its surroundings.

'This would be all the more apparent because of the open and exposed location.'

He said more coverage for the network is needed in the area, but he did not think this was the correct site.

Councillor Chris Carter said: 'This is excellent news for local residents and does, I believe, send out a wider message. Local residents will be delighted.

'I think they will continue looking, but clearly they will think more carefully about it next time.'

The mast was to be set up by Ericsson, which is getting 3's network off the ground.

William Comery, corporate affairs manager at Ericsson Services Ltd, said: 'It is unfortunate that it hasn't been granted.
This will delay the improvement of 3's services in the area.'
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Portsmouth Today, 31 Jan 2007

School's fight against phone mast plan
United Kingdom Created: 1 Feb 2007
PARENTS, governors and teachers at Ursuline College fear plans to build a 15 metre mobile phone mast just yards from school playing fields could put kids' lives at risk.
Head teacher Sister Alice Montgomery is fighting plans by Hutchinson 3G to put a mast outside the school on Canterbury Road, Westgate.
Sister Alice, 55, dubbed it 'madness', adding: "Experts simply do not know enough about the technology. It has the potential to harm young people. We have 1,000 children here and King Ethelbert school next door also has 1,000 walking past the site every day. If the worst happens, trying to prove someone's health is linked to a mast is virtually impossible.
"This is a school that spearheads sports and healthy living across Thanet. The proposal is totally inappropriate."
She has written to all 600 families at the school asking them to join her protest to Thanet council. Ursuline does not ban mobile phones but Sister Alice draws the line at a mast on her doorstep.

A spokesman for Harlequin, planning agents for Hutchinson 3G, said: "There are already four other masts in the immediate vicinity, but people don't notice them. Coverage for 3G is limited to a few hundred meters and placing the mast in a field wouldn't provide coverage where people are."
Click here to view the source article.
Source: icKent, Eileen O\'Brien, 31 Jan 2007

Massive backing for phone mast fight
United Kingdom Created: 1 Feb 2007
A petition with more than 1,200 signatures has been handed to Oxford City Council in a bid to fight plans for a mobile phone mast in Marston.
Mobile giant Vodafone wants to put the mast - disguised as a telegraph pole - in Jack Straw's Lane, near St Michael and All Angels Church.
The site in Marston Road is only 100 yards from a previous spot where a mast had been proposed a year ago.
Marston resident Michael Haines, who organised the petition, had collected 1,288 signatures by Monday.
Mr Haines, 66, of Croft Road, said: "I got my final signature on Monday. I was very pleased with the support.
"Everyone was more than willing to sign it. I have been going round each area of Marston for the past two weeks which has taken a lot of time and effort, but it has been worth it.

"There was only a few that didn't want to sign it because of employment at the council."
This is not Mr Haines first petition. He collected 779 signatures when he successfully blocked the earlier mast application from the Newbury-based firm in November 2005.
Vodafone thinks the new location for the 10-metre high phone mast - which will provide high-quality 3G coverage to the Marston area of Oxford - will have less impact on the environment.
The pole is to be placed near a number of trees which will provide some screening for the site. But the residents think it is unsightly and are worried it could lead to health problems.
Mr Haines, who hopes the council will oppose this new application, said: "I think the city council has got to sit up and take notice now.
"There are a lot of signatures on the petition. The residents feel that this mast is being pushed on us.
"Why should we have to put up with something that is going to be unsightly and potentially dangerous to our health, when we don't even want it there?"
Vodafone spokesman Rob Matthews said: "All Vodafone's sites follow exposure guidelines backed by independent bodies such as the World Health Organisation.
"There is a need for improved 3G coverage in this area of Oxford and without base stations people would not be able to use their 3G phones.
"Vodafone works closely with the council and local residents to ensure that their design is as visually unobtrusive as possible."
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Oxford mail, 31 Jan 2007

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