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Two experts added to ABC cancer investigation team
Australia Created: 26 Aug 2006
Two experts have been added to a panel investigating the incidence of breast cancer at Brisbane's ABC headquarters at Toowong.
Professor Malcolm Sim and Dr Joanne Aitken would join the panel chaired by Dr Bruce Armstrong, ABC managing director Mark Scott said today.
Mr Scott also said a staff reference group had been established to work alongside the panel.

ABC management earlier this month launched an independent review of the site after it was revealed 12 women who worked at the broadcaster's headquarters in Brisbane's inner-west, had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the past 11 years.

Professor Sim is an occupational and public health physician who heads Monash University's Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health.

Dr Aitken is a cancer epidemiologist and the Director of the Viertel Centre for Research in Cancer Control at the Queensland Cancer Fund.

Epidemiology is the scientific study of factors affecting the health and illness of individuals and populations.

"This team of experts together with Dr Bruce Armstrong, one of Australia's foremost authorities on the causes and control of cancers, will give the greatest insight into whether we have any issues arising from the technology, buildings or location of the facility," Mr Scott said in a statement.

ABC staff members Ian Eckersley, Nadia Farha and Kate Scanlan will make up the reference group who will meet regularly with Professor Armstrong to discuss the panel's progress.

"I am committed to achieving trust and transparency without hindering the capacity of Professor Armstrong's panel to do their work," Mr Scott said of the reference group.

"This (reference) group will make a significant contribution to the investigative effort."

Mr Scott said support services including free mammograms for all women working at the Toowong office and a free counselling service would continue to be available during the investigation.

Staff resolved to suspend industrial action for the time being, despite Mr Scott indicating he would not relocate staff unless the investigation found evidence of a cancer cluster.

Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) Queensland secretary David Waters said the staff would await the outcome of the investigation - expected to take months - before deciding on their next course of action.
Source: AAP Newsfeed


ABC staff in Brisbane concerned over breast cancer cluster
Australia Created: 10 Jul 2006
ABC staff in Brisbane are considering strike action over a growing cluster of breast cancer cases in the city's newsroom.
Nine women who've worked at the Toowong office have been diagnosed with breast cancer over the past 11 years.
The latest case was announced yesterday.
The site has been independently scientifically tested and cleared, with no known or probable causal factors discovered.
Non theless, ABC staff are angry and concerned, and some want the Brisbane offices moved.
HAMISH ROBERTSON:

KAREN BARLOW:
Nine predominantly young women from the ABC's Brisbane studios have now been diagnosed with breast cancer over the past 11 years.
The latest underwent a mastectomy this week.
David Waters from the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance says staff members are gravely concerned about working in the Toowong offices.
DAVID WATERS: Members are extremely angry. ABC employees within Brisbane are fearful, and that's entirely understandable.
KAREN BARLOW: Queensland Health conducted an independent scientific investigation last year into the cancer cluster at the request of staff.
The investigators tested for electromagnetic and radio frequency emissions. And they accepted a statement from ABC management that cancer causing ionising radiation sources were not been present on the site.
The final report found no link between the cancers and the workplace, and they made no recommendation for further environmental testing.

The ABC's Queensland State Director, Chris Wordsworth.
CHRIS WORDSWORTH: No one has been able to establish a link between the incidence of breast cancer and the sort of business that we undertake here, and newsrooms, electronic newsrooms around Australia and around the world undertake.
KAREN BARLOW: But, the MEAA's David Waters says questions about the cancer cluster remain.
Apart from the nine reported cases of breast cancer, Queensland Health says there are two others. One woman had breast cancer but died before the period under investigation and the other woman didn't provide enough information.
There have been two cases of other types of cancer and eight cases of benign breast disease.
Mr Waters is calling for a more thorough investigation of the site.

DAVID WATERS: While Queensland Health's investigation into the site didn't arrive at any prospective or possible causes for breast cancer, the investigation did find that there was a higher than community incidence of breast cancer at the site. So it has been established that there is a pattern of high incidence of breast cancer at the site.

KAREN BARLOW: The Queensland Cancer Fund says the nine diagnoses are a high number of cases for a small office, but its spokeswoman,
Ruth Miles, says they're probably purely coincidental.
RUTH MILES: You need to look at each case individually in terms of obviously the population, the fact that one in 11 women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, and that every case is very individual in terms of a woman's specific circumstances and her level of risk.

KAREN BARLOW: Some staff are calling for the studios to be shut down and they want to be moved to another area on the Toowong site.

They're backed by the MEAA's David Waters, who wants the entire Brisbane ABC moved to another site in the longer term.

He says these proposals will be considered at a staff meeting today.

DAVID WATERS: While there exists such an acute health and safety risk it is reasonable that members will consider strike action, and that has been suggested in this instance.

KAREN BARLOW: The ABC's Queensland Director, Chris Wordsworth, has said he's willing to consider a move.

HAMISH ROBERTSON: Karen Barlow reporting.


+++
The Australian (Australia)

9th ABC cancer woman
A NINTH woman in 12 years has been diagnosed with breast cancer while working atan ABC newsroom in Brisbane.
ABC state director Chris Wordsworth said staff at the Toowong site were told yesterday that the employee underwent a mastectomy this week.
A Queensland Health investigation last April found no link between the cases and the Toowong site.
Mr Wordsworth said independent tests, including for electromagnetic and radio frequency emissions, had also not identified a cause.
''We have undertaken a number of tests by independent organisations and, like the Queensland Health investigation, they have cleared the site of any known or probable link between breast cancer and working on the site,'' he said.
Jo Stone, an ABC television reporter at Toowong diagnosed with breast cancer last March, called for the site to be relocated.
''They say it's a coincidence but it just seems too much to be a coincidence now,'' she said.
The Toowong cases follow a recent cancer cluster scare at an RMIT University building in Melbourne, where seven people who worked on the top floors have been diagnosed with brain tumours in the past seven years. Health authorities insist there is no evidence of any link with mobile phone towers on the site's roof.
Source: S: Karen Barlow

Mobiles 'as addictive as smoking'
Australia Created: 23 Jun 2006
MOBILE-phone users who spend most of their waking hours glued to a handset may have to call a therapist after a university study found they were as addictive as smoking and junk food.
The heaviest mobile users even display the typical signs of "cold turkey" drug withdrawal - anxiety, restlessness and even panic - when parted from their phones.
The psychological cost of excessive mobile phone use was highlighted in a study published yesterday by Queensland University in Australia.

Diana James, the academic who led the study, said: "Mobile phone addiction is going to surpass internet addiction because at least you can walk away from your computer.

"Our dependency on mobiles means most people are never without them. The fact that handsets are carried around all day and provide instant pleasure means the risk of addiction is on a par with snacking on junk food and even smoking."

The Queensland study analysed people under 45 to establish the emotional, psychological, financial and social impact of their use of mobiles. It found some suffered low self-esteem if they were not free to receive calls and text messages and the phone appeared to be a kind of "security blanket" which improved feelings of self-worth. Other users appeared "obsessive" in their need to be near a mobile phone and became deeply agitated when parted from it.

In a few cases, large amounts of texting led to the physical symptoms of repetitive stress injury as well as the psychological issues, the report found.

Ms James said: "Like substance abuse, excessive use of mobile phones can lead to personal problems. People who use their phone heavily may be addicted - it depends on the impact it has on their day-to-day life. Is their phone costing them more than money in terms of emotional, social and physical stress?"

Britain's love affair with the mobile phone is now virtually universal, with 80 per cent of the population owning at least one. Ofcom, the telecoms watchdog, says the average Scot makes about 21 mobile phone calls a week and sends about 29 text messages. However, heavy use among office workers and younger people - particularly when it comes to texting - can send that tally far higher.

A 19-year-old from Paisley last year became what was thought to be the first person in Scotland to be treated for text addition. The teenager, whose name was not made public, spent £4,500 on text messaging in a year and at one point was sending approximately 700 texts a week. He received counselling at the Renfrewshire Council on Alcohol Trust in Paisley.

Philip Irvine, a project leader at the trust who treated the youth, described excessive mobile phone use as similar to a gambling addiction, in that users frequently become dependent to bolster their self-esteem.

"If a person is using a mobile phone to make themselves feel better, or it is actually impinging on their life - they are not going to work, or they are spending more money than they can afford - then I would certainly say they've got a problem," he said.

While texting in moderation remains comparatively cheap, financial problems with mobile phone bills have become an issue due to the soaring popularity of ringtone services. In many cases, people have been unaware that buying a single ringtone often means signing up to a subscription service costing £3 a week plus the cost of reverse-charge text messages. Missing a call sparks feeling of dread

FRANSINA Nuuyuni's dependence on her mobile phone extends to taking the odd call while in the toilet.

The 25-year-old, from Edinburgh, admits to spending about £120 a month on phone charges and calls.

Ms Nuuyuni, a receptionist who works for a Dalkeith-based property company, admits to using her mobile phone at least once an hour for calls or texts throughout the week and said her usage increases at the weekend.

The thought of being parted from her Nokia provokes feelings of dread.

"It would make me very awkward and anxious - as though I might miss out on something," she said. "I can't stand the thought of missing a call."

While Ms Nuuyuni admits to cooking while on the mobile phone, several rooms in her house remain off limits, for now.

"I don't take the mobile into the shower or the bath with me, although I do leave it behind the bathroom door so that I can hear it if it rings," she said.

Her main mobile phone vice is texting, a practice she occasionally suffers for.

"I love texting and sometimes get a sore thumb from texting so much," she said.

However, the office worker regards herself as a symptom of an era driven by technology rather than a victim of it - and is determined to keep up.

Ms Nuuyuni got her first mobile phone eight years ago and upgrades her handset every two years.

"It's important to keep up with new technology if it makes life easier," she said.

"I'm going to upgrade my phone next month so that I can get one with a camera and video on it."

Ms Nuuyuni admits that one consequence of upgrading to a new handset is that she will probably spend "even longer" on the mobile phone than before.
©2006 Scotsman.com
http://news.scotsman.com/uk.cfm?id=674072006
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Catherine Gamba

The jury is out on whether mobile phones are as safe as the phone companies would have us believe.
Australia Created: 22 Jun 2006
Mobiles: are they doing you harm?
The jury is out on whether mobile phones are as safe as the phone companies would have us believe.

Professor Con Stough, from the Brain Sciences Institute at Melbourne's Swinburne University, says he finally has scientific proof that mobile phones are having an impact on our heads.

He tested 120 people to see how the electromagnetic radiation affected their memory and ability to solve problems and the results have been published in the scientific journal Neurophyschologia.

"In a few cases, performance improved, but in the majority of cases performance decreased," he says.

"For things like memory or information processing, or learning, there was an impairment due to the mobile phones."

Chris Althaus, CEO of the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association, which represents mobile phone companies, points out that while Professor Stough's research does show mobiles cause changes in brain activity, that doesn't mean they're doing us any damage.

"We've looked at the study by the professor and, really, the impacts are low-level, they're not health-related, and it begs a deal of further research on the issue," he says.

"You can be absolutely assured that mobile phones are safe, the results of this study indicate some impact on brain activity in a slowing of reaction time but equally, in other instances, other studies have shown a speeding up of reaction time."

Professor Stough, however, says that while his study doesn't conclusively demonstrate negative impacts on health, changes to biological processes are the precursors to changes in health.

But until there is definitive proof that mobiles are or aren't harmful to us, there are a few things you can do to reduce your exposure to mobile phone radiation:
• When dialling someone else, hold your phone away from your head until you hear the other person answer. When your phone is dialling or receiving a call there is far more radiation being emitted, so if you keep it away from your head that will reduce your exposure.
• Only use your phone when you've got a strong signal — four or five bars showing. The phone will work with fewer reception signal bars but will emit a lot more radiation.
• Children and teenagers have smaller, thinner skulls than adults and therefore are going to receive more radiation through the head. Think about whether your child needs a mobile at all and encourage teenagers to use mobiles less.
• Use a hands-free kit. Experts say it can reduce your exposure by up to 94 percent.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Kalle Hallberg

Phone tower cancer fears
Australia Created: 13 May 2006
A SPATE of brain tumours among staff has forced RMIT University to close part of its business school and test for radiation emissions from rooftop phone towers.

As staff reacted with shock, the university yesterday shut the top two floors of the Bourke Street building and ordered more than 100 employees to work from home for the next fortnight.
The closure follows the discovery of five brain tumours in the past month and two others in 1999 and 2001. Two were malignant and five were benign.
WorkCover has launched an investigation and RMIT has promised its own inquiry.
The academics' union last night expressed concern that the tumours were caused by the communications towers on the roof of the former Tivoli Theatre site.
National Tertiary Education Union state secretary Matthew McGowan warned that anecdotal reports from hastily arranged staff meetings yesterday suggested the number of people affected would grow.
"You have to ask some pretty serious questions and we're obviously concerned that it could be linked to the tower," he said.
"This would appear to be much more than coincidence and RMIT has a responsibility to leave no stone unturned in seeking the truth."
Five of the seven affected work on the top floor of the 17-storey building. All except one have worked in the building for at least a decade.
An RMIT academic who did not want to be named said staff - the 16th and 17th floors are home to offices of senior management and lecturers - were "in disbelief, concerned and upset" as they attended meetings and left the building late yesterday.
Medical experts contacted by The Age said no definitive link had been proved between mobile phone tower radiation and cancer.
Australian Medical Association president Mukesh Haikerwal said there was no proof of a connection but "if you get clusters of disease it's sensible to investigate."
Dr John Gall, from private health company Southern Medical Services, which has been called in to assess the sick, said last night three of those affected had tumours showing symptoms consistent with radiation.
But he said there was no causal link with the building based on preliminary observations.
A spokesman for state Health Minister Bronwyn Pike said WorkCover would investigate the matter and the Department of Human Services would provide any expertise needed.
RMIT chief operating officer Steve Somogyi said testing was carried out on the building after the first two of the seven tumours were reported in 1999 and 2001. It found radiation and air quality levels within recommended guidelines.

"We value the health and safety of our staff and students very highly. The incidence of illness is disturbing and we shall continue to check for any possible cause connected to the building," Mr Somogyi said.
But RMIT union branch president Jeanette Pierce said the university agreed to shut the two floors only after being pressured by the union. "I'm a bit mystified that the university wasn't planning to vacate and that we had to make the point that they needed to vacate those two floors," she said.
There are more than 160 mobile phone towers in central Melbourne alone. A Telstra spokeswoman said last night the company had two towers at the Tivoli site, but both met health and safety standards and were tested regularly.
"An enormous amount of medical research has been conducted without any substantiated evidence of a link between mobile phone technology and adverse health effects, including cancer," she said.
RMIT management emailed all staff and students late yesterday and said health check-ups and counselling would be made available. About 600 staff work in the building.
Mr McGowan said shutting the two floors should be just the first step. "We think they should be testing all staff who have worked on those levels and not just for tumours. We need to understand what are the health risks that people are suffering," he said.
A help line for students and family members is available on 1800 155 945.
Tanya Stoianoff, the executive director of the Mobile Carriers Forum, which represents mobile phone companies, said there was no credible scientific evidence of health effects from living or working near a mobile phone base station.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: The Age, Adam Morton and David Rood, May 12, 2006

"Mobile phones do affect brain function"
Australia Created: 28 Apr 2006
"Scientists at Swinburne University of Technology's Brain Sciences Institute in Melbourne studied the performances of 120 healthy volunteers on a series of psychological tests during half an hour of exposure to mobile phone emissions. ...The study showed evidence of slower response times for participants undertaking simple reactions and more complex reactions, such as choosing a response when there is more than one alternative," Professor Stough said. "Mobile phones do seem to affect brain function. They seem to be fairly small effects but nevertheless, something's happening."
Prof Stough said research by the institute suggested the effects of mobile phone radiation on the brain was cumulative. "People, for instance, who use the mobile phone a lot seem to have more of an impairment than people who are more naive users," he said in an interview.
As for any use of mobile phones in cars – hands free or not – Prof Stough is against it. "I think they should be banned from cars," he said.

http://www.sundaytimes.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,7034,18947024%255E1702,00.html
http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1621201.htm
http://www.emfacts.com/weblog/?p=444

The Abstract
http://eutils.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16616941&itool=pubmed_DocSum

Neuropsychological sequelae of digital mobile phone exposure in humans
Vanessa Keetleya, Andrew W. Wooda, b, Jo Sponga and Con Stougha, ,

a:Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic. 3122, Australia
b:Centre for Biomedical Instrumentation, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic. 3122, Australia

Received 6 October 2005; revised 14 February 2006; accepted 1 March 2006. Available online 17 April 2006.

Abstract
The effect of electromagnetic fields from digital mobile phones (DMP) on cognitive functioning is an area receiving increased attention. This study compares the performance of 120 volunteers on 8 neuropsychological tests during real or sham exposure to a DMP set to maximum permissible radiofrequency power output. When results were adjusted for known covariates (gender, age, or education), several alterations at significance levels of p < 0.05 were obtained. Of these, simple and choice reaction times (CRT) showed strong evidence of impairment. Further, performance on the Trail Making Task (TMT) improved, supporting the hypothesis that DMP radiofrequency emissions improve the speed of processing of information held in working memory.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: admin

”Mobilstrålning påverkar hjärnan – Förbjud mobilen i bilen ...”
Australia Created: 28 Apr 2006
Läs mer om den nya studien från Australien
"Scientists at Swinburne University of Technology's Brain Sciences Institute in Melbourne studied the performances of 120 healthy volunteers on a
series of psychological tests during half an hour of exposure to mobile phone emissions. ...The study showed evidence of slower response times
for participants undertaking simple reactions and more complex reactions, such as choosing a response when there is more than one alternative," Professor Stough said. "Mobile phones do seem to affect brain function. They seem to be fairly small effects but nevertheless, something's happening."
Prof Stough said research by the institute suggested the effects of mobile phone radiation on the brain was cumulative. "People, for instance, who use the mobile phone a lot seem to have more of an impairment than people who are more naive users," he said in an interview.
As for any use of mobile phones in cars – hands free or not – Prof Stough is against it. "I think they should be banned from cars," he said.

http://www.sundaytimes.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,7034,18947024%255E1702,00.html
http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1621201.htm
http://www.emfacts.com/weblog/?p=444

Abstract studien:
http://eutils.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16616941&itool=pubmed_DocSum

Neuropsychological sequelae of digital mobile phone exposure in humans
Vanessa Keetleya, Andrew W. Wooda, b, Jo Sponga and Con Stougha,
a: Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic. 3122, Australia
b: Centre for Biomedical Instrumentation, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic. 3122, Australia

Received 6 October 2005; revised 14 February 2006; accepted 1 March 2006. Available online 17 April 2006.

Abstract
The effect of electromagnetic fields from digital mobile phones (DMP) on cognitive functioning is an area receiving increased attention. This study compares the performance of 120 volunteers on 8 neuropsychological tests during real or sham exposure to a DMP set to maximum permissible radiofrequency power output. When results were adjusted for known covariates (gender, age, or education), several alterations at significance levels of p < 0.05 were obtained. Of these, simple and choice reaction times (CRT) showed strong evidence of impairment. Further, performance on the Trail Making Task (TMT) improved, supporting the hypothesis that DMP radiofrequency emissions improve the speed of processing of information held in working memory.

Mobiles 'do affect' the brain
Australia Created: 28 Apr 2006
RADIATION emitted by mobile phones does affect brain function, Australian research suggests.
Scientists at Swinburne University of Technology's Brain Sciences Institute in Melbourne studied the performances of 120 healthy volunteers on a series of psychological tests during half an hour of exposure to mobile phone emissions.

They compared the results with those collected when the same volunteers were tested in a "sham" condition, in which the mobile phone was not emitting radiation.

The study was designed so neither the scientists nor the participants were aware when the mobile phone was turned on.

Lead researcher Con Stough said yesterday the study found the subjects' reaction times and information processing were impaired by the mobile phone
emissions.

"The study showed evidence of slower response times for participants undertaking simple reactions and more complex reactions, such as choosing a response when there is more than one alternative," he said. "Mobile phones do seem to affect brain function. They seem to be fairly small effects but, nevertheless, something's happening."

The research was published in this month's edition of the journal, Neuropsychologia.

Professor Stough said research by the institute, which was yet to be published, suggested the effects of mobile phone radiation on the brain was cumulative.
"People, for instance, who use the mobile phone a lot seem to have more of an impairment than people who are more naive users," he said.

Elderly people apparently were more sensitive to the effects than younger users.

Professor Stough, however, was not about to give away his own mobile phone. "It's such a part of modern society and we haven't established that there's
negative health consequences. That's a different type of study," he said.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: S: By JANELLE MILES/AAP

ENVIRONMENT, COMMUNICATIONS, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS REFERENCES COMMITTEE
Australia Created: 2 Feb 2006
SENATE
ENVIRONMENT, COMMUNICATIONS, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
AND THE ARTS REFERENCES COMMITTEE
Tuesday, 7 November 2000

Prof. JOHANSSON was present in Australia.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: S:

WHO conference impressions in Melbourne 17 November 2005. Resume!
Australia Created: 16 Jan 2006
WHO conference impressions in Melbourne 17 November 2005.

I attended the WHO regional workshop on RF, health effects and policy options, at Swinburne University Melbourne 17th November, and make a report.

Unfortunately I missed the opening address of Dr. Michael Repacholi, and arrived to about 120 people during the presentation of Dr. Emilie van Deventer on sensitive subpopulations to RF. Dr. van Deventer stated that there was need to do further work on the topic of electrosensitivity (she called it electrical hypersensitivity), and indicated that it seemed to be a problem to address. She also addressed the issues of possible vulnerability of children to EMF’s.

I think around this time an audience member raised the difficulties presented with running provocation studies with electrosensitivity it is very hard getting recruits. Electrosensitives will need to also make themselves available for carefully conducted studies by ethical investigators, such as ten WLANSs, DECT phones, silent computers etc running under a bed to get anything done. This is very difficult for people with some conditions like tinnitus, which can be degenerative. The audience member also stated that the electrosensitives may be accused of having psychological problems. It was also noted that it is difficult to keep up with the pace of the rollout of technologies, a continual problem with research.

The ARPANSA rep to the WHO gave a summary of current developments in wireless, such as wireless USB, among other subjects.

After the end of his presentation, an audience member asked whether the Mobile Carriers Forum would contribute to any future ARPANSA presentations,
which was denied.

He had covered microcells and picocells, so I asked him: With respect to microcells and picocells and macrocells, Australia has a large rural and regional
area and we intend to probably service it with macrocells. Currently at the town of Crest in the south of France, there is a macrocell, and the death rate in its vicinity in August was 18 times higher than the surrounding population. Also there is a report of about 20 cancers near a tower in Sevilla in
Spain. Does the WHO or ARPANSA have any plans to send teams into those places to collect data and get to the bottom of this ?.
No. the WHO does not enter other countries.

The ACRBR presented some of their scientific data, including some promising theoretical work on the action of radiation on protein molecules by a resonance mechanism. They have also set up a small study into electrosensitivity. It will not be complete until 2007.

Dr Veyret from France presented initially an overview of European research. He said that there are many highly experienced teams in Italy, where he is on sabbatical, compared to other countries. They have recently lost their funding. An industry rep in the audience asked how much money had been spent on research 9 10 million euros per anum for some years.
Around this time what appeared to be an industry rep said at an EMR health conference possibly we should ignore the EMR health issue because we could have the whole world connected and speaking English.

After a break, Lindsay Martin, manager in EMR section at ARPANSA presented and stated it was clear tha there was concern and anger in some sections of
the community, and showed an openness to discussing the subject with the public. He asked for suggestions on courses of action and showed some moves to more involved in properly assessing the situation and engaging the public. This accompanied a change in the tone of the proceedings, and more discussion from the audience. Presenters were mentioning discoveries of effects.

Dr Veyret again presented, on the subject ‘Are mobile phones or their base stations dangerous’. Early on he stated that there was no apparent danger from base stations. I couldn’t help but laugh and my neighbour moved chairs.

In his presentation on animal studies etc, he gave some ground on proven effects, and I believe it was he who noted that sleep studies were settling towards showing disturbed sleep issues, as well as some other factor that I forget. He handballed real world epidemiology, the most obvious issue, onto the next speaker, as had the ARPANSA/ WHO rep. He did note the possible interaction of chemicals with EMF’s, and highlighted the difficulties in the research.

He had stated that there was no evidence of genotoxic damage. I queried that there were 2 or 3 studies recently showing sperm damage, which was not
outright DNA damage but interference. He denied this.

A Swedish professor who had been lumbered with the job of explaining cancer outbreaks got up. He presented a carefully balanced analysis of brain tumour data from multiple sources, admitting that some sources were now leading towards indicating there may be a risk, but the data was really muddied and too hard to draw firm conclusions at this stage. Large cancer outbreaks were not discussed and questions were asked about which side of the head the tumours were appearing compared to the phone.

Professor Laurie Challis presented some mathematical models showing interactions of EMR with tissue when pulsed. He stated that while nothing was concrete, it was noted that very large peak radiation doses could occur at some conditions such as cell membranes or sharp points, but only in certain frequency ranges.

While there was lively discussion and debate from both industry and non- industry sides, it does appear that there may be some degree of conciliation from some quarters of the WHO concerning previous shortcomings of the WHO process.

Finally in question time at the end, an industry rep asked why dont we shut all research down now, its an expensive waste of time, there is no harm and its just giving people ideas. The panel disagreed. I had the last question. Regarding epidemiology: We have two studies showing a weak to moderated association of various EMFs with Alzheimer’s. Also we now have the paper "1997 a curious year in Sweden" (Olle Johansen) (one of the panel sunk down in his chair pretty upset, this study is not conclusive) claiming to show a ‘drastic’ was their word rise in the rate of Alzheimer’s since 1997 in Sweden when a second band of mobile phones and other digital broadcasts was introduced. While figures have not been provided, although several illness variables are shown to be related to mobile phone output levels in various counties in Sweden, does the WHO have any plans to conduct any epidemiology on Alzheimers ?. The Swedish professor had never heard of the Swedish study from his own Swedish institute, and suggested a 10 year cohort investigation. The convenor suggested that it must have been one of those lesser quality studies and there was unanimous laughter, and we finished the day with applause.

I didn’t attend the second day. It is foreseeable that if interested public parties attend these meetings in different parts of the world, without getting to out
of hand, the calibre of scientific enquiry from the WHO may rise soon- some statements that had previously come out do border on scientific fraud. If electrosensitives want to play, they will have to become actively involved in study design and formalising things.

A press report associated with Michael Repacholi, "TV poses more risk than mobile phone", which whitewashes the contents of Thursday’s debate has appeared, containing the statements ‘People are generally scared by new technology … but after $250 million in research over ten years we still haven't found any (reason for health concerns). The purpose of this is to tell people what the real situation is, what the science is saying … It’s no use perpetuating
a myth.’ This statement as reported is false and misleading and deceptive, and is designed to create a poisonous situation. There is a chance that mobile phone tower morbidity studies and reports represent isolated occurrences of a tower interacting with an uncommon secondary factor. Sorting the electromagnetic factors from the medical ones is a very difficult task, and some misattributions to radiation have probably occurred. However, elsewhere the deaths and illness in Crest have been referred to as ‘psychological’ problems. Some of this behaviour by operators at some outbreak sites worldwide is approaching manslaughter and madness. If continued propaganda is distributed by the head of the WHO EMF project, Dr Michael Repacholi, the WHO should be forced to sack him and replace him with a scientist.

Telstra, Australia's telecommunications leader with many representatives at the conference, has just announced last week it intends to run the whole country on 3G, and become the leader in wireless internet in an ABC television interview on Sunday 20th November.

The WHO:

The WHO EMF project has been publicly riddled with controversy over its funding and leadership.

If the WHO wants to launch a tsunami disaster relief project, they need a mobile insertion squad. If you want to scramble power and resources to the far
corners of the earth, you need technology.

This technology also increases globalisation and assists medical research, which assists the WHO’s mission.

But what if this technology drives individuals senile and homeless ?.

The WHO EMF Project is fundamentally conflicted between the desire to help the whole, and duty to protect the individual. Big business has taken advantage of this to stymie the EMF project. The only solution to this conflict is aggressive, fearless science.

The Media:

The media with the telecommunications revolution is one of the biggest stakeholders in this. In effect, it appears the media channels have placed a ban on reporting these deaths, diseases and electrorefugees.
The media has not helped, and will probably not help.
They are fundamentally conflicted.

For interested parties to get the word out to the public and defeat propaganda, new methods will be required: direct bulk emailing of all info to academia and social leaders for example. Mast dwellers and electrosensitives must get creative with new communications technologies (such as SMS and javascript) to get the message out and get the proper research done. Otherwise a media blackout will prevail. Only searching real world research will
determine whether we are over-reacting to EMR.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: S.

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