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Electrosensitivity: 'I didn't believe people had it, then it happened to me'
United Kingdom Created: 11 Feb 2020
Fatigue, pain, headaches, dizziness, burning, twitching, nausea, palpitations.

Watch the 15 min. video via the source link below...

Just some of the symptoms experienced by people who say they suffer from 'electrosensitivity'.

Electrosensitives – who are mostly self-diagnosed - say that electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, wi-fi and other modern technology are making them seriously ill.

Years of well-controlled, double-blind studies have found no evidence that electromagnetic fields cause these symptoms.

The World Health Organisation says electrosensitivity is not a medical diagnosis, and both the WHO and Public Health England say there’s no scientific basis that these symptoms are linked to electromagnetic field exposure.

But, with super-fast 5G mobile technology spreading across the UK, electrosensitives are getting increasingly worried.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: BBC, 07 Feb 2020

Scientists Sue FCC for Dismissing Studies Linking Cell Phone Radiation to Cancer
USA Created: 7 Feb 2020
A Nobel Prize-winning scientist has filed a lawsuit alleging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) failed to update cellular phone and wireless radiofrequency (RF) radiation limits and cellular phone testing methods in over two decades. These failures, the plaintiffs contend, ignore “peer-reviewed scientific studies showing that radiation from cell phones and cell phone towers and transmitters is associated with severe health effects in humans, including cancer, DNA damage, damage to the reproductive organs, and brain damage (including memory problems).”

Law&Crime obtained an exclusive copy of the lawsuit from Nobel co-laureate Devra Davis, who currently serves as president of the Environmental Health Trust (EHT), the lead plaintiffs in the action.

”The FCC has for years failed to protect public health by relying on 24-year-old safety tests designed when phones were the size of a shoe and used by few,” Davis told Law&Crime via email. ”We filed this appeal in order to insist that the agency take full measure of the U.S. government and other scientific evidence that cellphone radiation can be harmful.”

Davis continued, noting the FCC’s hands-off approach to cell phone-related regulation over the last three presidential administrations.

”The agency has dismissed hundreds of scientific studies submitted to its inquiry on wireless radiation and the advice of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and others, without providing any rationale for doing so,” she said.

The lawsuit specifically accuses the FCC of violating the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and is requesting an appeal of the agency’s prior order denying to revisit cellular phone standards. From the filing:

[The FCC] (1) has improperly terminated a Notice of Inquiry begun in 2013 to review, update, and amend its emission exposure limits for radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted by telecommunications devices and facilities, including but not limited to cell phones and cell phone towers and transmitters; (2) has improperly revised the criteria for determining when a licensee is exempt from its RF exposure evaluation criteria and the methods that RF equipment operators can use to mitigate the risk of excess exposure to the public and to workers; and (3) has improperly denied a petition for reconsideration of the [FCC’s] finding, and otherwise improperly rejected public comments, that the pinnae (outer ears) should be treated like other extremities for purposes of determining compliance with the RF emission exposure limits.

“The [FCC’s prior] Order exceeds the [FCC’s] statutory authority and poses significant risks to the public health, safety, and security,” the filing continues.

The plaintiffs’ attorney Edward Myers slammed the FCC’s prior decision in comments to Law&Crime.

“The FCC’s order terminated an inquiry into the adequacy of existing health and safety standards for radiofrequency radiation from wireless devices and facilities, including cell phones and cell phone towers and transmitters,” he said. “The existing regulations were promulgated in 1996 based on scientific data from 1992 and the FCC had commenced the inquiry in 2013 after the General Accounting Office (GAO) issued a report finding that the existing standards may be based on outdated science and may need to be updated.”

Myers continued, clarifying the relief sought:

In challenging the FCC’s decision, the petitioners contend that the agency has unlawfully disregarded a large body of evidence in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act and the National Environmental Policy Act, among others. This evidence includes numerous peer-reviewed scientific studies showing that radiation from cell phones and cell phone towers and transmitters is associated with severe health effects in humans, including cancer, DNA damage, damage to the reproductive organs, and brain damage (including memory problems). The petitioners are seeking to have the court remand the matter to the FCC so that it can complete the inquiry into its standards based on current science.

Davis went on to compare the lax regulatory environment to the state of affairs between U.S. administrative agencies and the powerhouse automobile industry until a consumer push—and concurrent litigation—led by Ralph Nader led to a series of meaningful reforms in the 1980s.

“Unlike France and Israel, many Americans are ignorant of the fact that phones are two-way microwave radios that are tested while held inches away from the body. Safety advice is also hidden within operating systems about keeping devices away from the abdomen of pregnant women or children,” Davis said. “Just like cars in the 1970s, we need the equivalent of airbags and seatbelts, that have saved millions of lives, to ensure hardware and software operate at the lowest feasible levels and protect billions of children and others using wireless radiating devices that comply with outmoded standards.”

“The FCC is ignoring the recommendation of our nation’s largest organization of children’s doctors—the American Academy of Pediatrics,” EHT Executive Director Theodora Scarato told Law&Crime—noting that the physician-led group “asked the FCC to test phones the way we use them—in positions against the body—and the FCC said it was unnecessary.”

Law&Crime reached out to the FCC for comment and will update this space if we receive one.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Law & Crime, Colin Kalmbacher, 04 Feb 2020

The 'race to 5G' is a myth
USA Created: 7 Feb 2020
Telecommunications providers relentlessly extol the power of fifth-generation (5G) wireless technology. Government officials and policy advocates fret that the winner of the "5G race" will dominate the internet of the future, so America cannot afford to lose out. Pundits declare that 5G will revolutionize the digital world. It all sounds very thrilling. Unfortunately, the hype has gone too far.
5G systems will, over time, replace today's 4G, just as next year's iPhone 12 will improve on this year's 11. 5G networks offer significantly greater transmission capacity. However, despite all the hype, they won't represent a radical break from the current mobile experience.

First of all, the "race to 5G" is a myth. 5G is a marketing term for a family of technologies, which carriers can stretch to cover a variety of networks. The technical standards are still under development, so what counts as "true" 5G is arguable. As with 4G, the 5G rollout will take years, as carriers upgrade their networks with new gear and users buy new phones. Just as they do today, connections will fall back to slower speeds when users aren't near enough to a tower, or if the network is overloaded. There's no magic moment when a carrier, or a nation, "has" 5G.

Even if there was a race, it's over: South Korea and China have already built much more extensive 5G networks than the United States. But that shouldn't be cause for panic. Customers in those countries may have a leg up on faster connections, but that doesn't necessarily create a sustainable strategic advantage. Romania is one of 10 countries with significantly faster average fixed broadband connections than America today, yet no one in Washington seems concerned that will give Romanian firms a dominant advantage. The major tech platforms delivering innovative digital services to the world are still based in the United States and China. There are important concerns about the Chinese networking firm Huawei creating backdoors for surveillance or tilting the carrier equipment market toward Chinese-defined standards. Your 5G user experience, however, won't depend on who makes the gear in the guts of the network.

The overheated rhetoric is based on the misconception that 5G heralds a new era of services for end-users. In reality, the claimed performance — hundreds of megabits or even gigabits per second — is misleading. Averages and ideal numbers mask huge variations depending on distance to an antenna, obstructions, weather and other factors. The fastest speeds require "millimeter wave" spectrum, which doesn't penetrate walls or foliage well, and is generally less reliable than the lower frequencies used today. Millimeter wave requires a much denser network of antennas, which could be cost-prohibitive outside dense urban areas. Even if that hurdle is overcome, a gigabit per second to millions of phones requires a network able to move traffic at that speed end-to-end, which doesn't exist today.

And just what are the applications that need more capacity than 4G offers? We already get crystal-clear video chats, a torrent of TikToks, Pokemon Go augmented reality, and massive Fortnite battles. Yes, every advance in network performance opened up new uses that seemed insignificant before, but the new capabilities of 5G are best suited to non-consumer applications.
If and when fleets of self-driving vehicles communicate constantly with each other or remote robotic surgery is a standard feature in local hospitals, 5G will be a must. But these next-generation "internet of things" scenarios are years in the future, as are the kinds of virtual and augmented reality worlds that appear in science fiction.

The most immediate use of 5G is "network slicing" to rapidly deploy and reconfigure specialized networks for financial, health care and other applications. Enterprises that need quality of service guarantees can access a virtual "slice" of capacity, rather than building a separate network. It's a big deal for carriers and large companies. Not so sexy for ordinary consumers.

When we look back from 2030, the changes in the digital world will be dramatic. The 5G platform will support those changes, just as 2G, 3G, and 4G wireless did in prior decades. However, the heralded innovations of 2019 to 2021 will seem insignificant.
Enjoy your new 5G phone when it arrives. Just don't expect it to bring you to wireless nirvana.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: CNN Business Perspectives, Kevin Werbach, 03 Feb 2020

Objectors fear new 5G phone masts at Brixham could harm rare bats
United Kingdom Created: 7 Feb 2020
People are objecting to two new mobile phone masts for the new 5G network at Brixham because of concerns the radio waves could harm wildlife.

They say the new higher towers will be ugly and have also raised concerns about the effect of the technology on human health.

Nearby Berry Head National Nature Reserve is home to an important colony of the rare greater horseshoe bat, which is protected under planning law.

Objectors are raising concerns that the higher frequency waves used by the new masts could interfere with the bats.

The creatures use echo-location from a high-pitched call to navigate through their surroundings.

The nature reserve also has a population of a rare bird, called the cirl bunting.

Campaigners say there is evidence that 5G radio waves can affect the natural behaviour of animals and insects.

Planning applications have been submitted for replacements masts at two sports grounds - Brixham Athletic Football Club in Wall Park Road, and Brixham Rugby Club at Astley Park off Rea Barn Road.

The Brixham football club plan would see a 17m pole replaced with a 20m tower.

The scheme for the rugby ground is for a 20m tower to replace a 15m pole.

The new 5th Generation mobile phone technology uses higher frequency signals which do not travel as far.

So more base stations are needed and the masts are higher to avoid being blocked by buildings and trees.

Both applications at Brixham are from Mobile Broadband Network Limited, a joint venture between the networks EE and Three.

One objector to the Wall Park Road mast said the site was too close to the Berry Head Nature Reserve and was concerned that the radio waves would affect the birds and bats.

Another said: “5G is a new technology and has the potential to cause immense harm to humans, trees, insects and wildlife.

“I feel it is imperative that the council put safety first and do not allow installations like this to go ahead until such time as it can be determined there are no detrimental effects.”

One objector wrote: “I feel this action, were it to go ahead, would represent a most unforgiving blot on a very beautiful area of Torbay.

“It is not only the health concerns for us all but also for our precious bats and other wildlife, which are simply irreplaceable.”

The agent for the applications says the new masts would provide coverage for the existing 4G and new 5G networks.

Beacon Comms points out that Government planning guidance supports “high quality communications infrastructure” as essential for economic growth, and recommends using existing sites to minimise the number of base stations.

The agent says in a planning statement: “The proposed increase in height is the minimum capable of providing the technological improvements sought.

“It is imperative that support is given to the introduction of 5G technology as this will allow networks to be able to handle more data and connect more devices simultaneously at much faster speeds than is possible using the existing technology.

“This will enable places to remain competitive in and will support the Government’s ambition for the UK to become a world leader in 5G technology.”

Campaigners in Torbay have asked Torbay Council to pause the roll-out of the technology because of health concerns and a petition is due to be presented to the authority at a meeting on Thursday, February 6.

They say 5G technology has not been fully tested and studies on animals have shown a link to health effects including an increased risk of cancer.

They point to research which shows an effect on the navigation of birds and insects.

Public Health England says years of studies of radio waves show the risk of damage to health is unlikely at exposure to levels below internationally agreed limits.

The council says it will listen to local people’s views but it has to work within the national planning framework and public health guidelines.

Local councils cannot refuse a phone mast on health grounds if it is certified to operate within the international safety guidelines used in the UK.

The proposed masts at Brixham would both operate under the limits for radio waves.

In January, Torbay Council’s planning committee refused an application to upgrade a phone mast site for the 5G network at the entrance to the Beverley Holidays park in Goodrington Road, Paignton.

The application on behalf of EE and Three was to replace a 13.5m pole with one 20m high and six replacement cabinets.

Councillors voted against the application because of the visual impact and perception of health effects of the technology which the park owners warned could damage the business.

Base stations are linked to the mobile phone network and use radio waves to carry the signals to and from handsets. Cells overlap to provide a seamless service.

The 5G service was launched in major UK cities in May 2019 and is due to cover Devon this year, promising faster download speeds and the next generation of internet connectivity.

The planning applications will be decided in due course, either by officers using delegated powers or by councillors on the planning committee.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: DevonLive, Edward Oldfield, 06 Feb 2020

Appeals that matter or not on a moratorium on the deployment of the fifth generation, 5G, for microwave radiation
Sweden Created: 29 Jan 2020
In a new article the history of an appeal sent to EU on a moratorium on the deployment of 5G is described. The full article can be found here:

https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/mco.2020.1984

Excerpt:

In an appeal sent to the EU in September, 2017 currently >260 scientists and medical doctors requested for a moratorium on the deployment of 5G until the health risks associated with this new technology have been fully investigated by industry‑independent scientists. The appeal and four rebuttals to the EU over a period of >2 years, have not achieved any positive response from the EU to date. Unfortunately, decision makers seem to be uninformed or even misinformed about the risks. EU officials rely on the opinions of individuals within the ICNIRP and the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR), most of whom have ties to the industry……In this article, the warnings on the health risks associated with RF presented in the 5G appeal and the letters to the EU Health Commissioner since September, 2017 and the authors’ rebuttals are summarized. The responses from the EU seem to have thus far prioritized industry profits to the detriment of human health and the environment.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Lennart Hardell blog, 28 Jan 2020

First 5G Global Protest: Worldwide News Coverage
USA Created: 28 Jan 2020
Go to the source link below to find links to global media coverage of Stop 5G protests.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: SaferEMR, Joel M. Moskowitz, 27 Jan 2020

Thyroid Cancer, Genetic Variations, and Cell Phones Linked in New Yale School of Public Health Study
USA Created: 20 Jan 2020
Radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

The researchers examined over 900 people in Connecticut and found that those with certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (genetic variations commonly referred to as SNPs and pronounced as “snips”) were significantly more likely to develop cancer in their thyroid, a gland in the throat that controls metabolism.

Cell phone users with SNPs in four of the genes studied were more than two times likely to develop cancer. The researchers examined a total of 176 genes and identified 10 SNPs that appear to increase the risk of thyroid cancer among cell phone users.

Published in the journal Environmental Research, the study is believed to be the first to examine the combined influence of genetic susceptibility and cell phone use in relation to thyroid cancer.

“Our study provides evidence that genetic susceptibility influences the relationship between cell phone use and thyroid cancer,” said Yawei Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Yale School of Public Health. “More studies are needed to identify populations who are susceptible to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) and understand exposure to RFR by different using patterns of cell phones.”

Our study provides evidence that genetic susceptibility influences the relationship between cell phone use and thyroid cancer.
- Yawei Zhang

The findings suggest that genetic susceptibilities play an important role in cell phone use and the risk of developing thyroid cancer and could help to identify subgroups who are potentially at risk. Further research is needed to confirm the findings and to better understand the interaction between cell phone radiation and SNPs within specific genes.

The rates of thyroid cancer have been steadily increasing in the United States and in many other parts of the world, Zhang said. According to the American Cancer Society’s most recent report, there were nearly 53,000 new cases of thyroid cancer in the United States, resulting in 2,180 deaths. Thyroid cancer is three times more common in women and is diagnosed at a younger age than most other cancers.

Zhang noted that the study relied on data collected from 2010 to 2011 when smartphones were first being introduced to the market. At the time, only a small proportion of people had smart phones. Therefore, if cell phone use increased the risk of thyroid cancer, it was possibly due to the use of earlier generation cell phones that were more commonly used when the data was collected.

Additionally, the transition to smartphones has also seen a major change in how cell phones are used (e.g., texting vs. phone calls). As a result, findings from this current study warrant a further evaluation in future studies, she said.

Other Yale School of Public Health researchers involved in the study include Jiajun Luo, Hang Li, Nicole Deziel, Huang Huang and Shuangge Ma. Researchers from China and Florida also co-authored the study.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Yale School of Medicine, Sayuri Gavaskar, 17 Jan 2020

NTP Scientists Endorse Precaution
USA Created: 17 Jan 2020
First Federal Officials To Take a Stand on Cell Phone Safety.

Earlier this week an Italian court of appeals in Turin affirmed a decision to compensate a man who charged that he had developed a tumor after using a mobile phone. In its write-up, the U.K. Guardian quoted the Italian health minister saying that the court had made a mistake because there is no proof to support such a link.

Huh? Once again the findings of the $30 million animal study by the U.S. National Toxicology Program showing "clear evidence" of a cancer risk are being ignored —by the Italian minister and the Guardian reporter. The NTP study may not constitute "proof," but it shows that simple denial cannot be justified.

Part of the problem has been with the NTP scientists themselves. They have shown ambivalence about their own findings, allowing others to make up their own narratives.

That has now changed.

NTP scientists have revealed that they are taking precautions to minimize their radiation exposures from cell phones.

Read about this important development in our latest story:
https://microwavenews.com/short-takes-archive/ntp-endorses-precaution

Louis Slesin, PhD
Editor, Microwave News
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Microwave News, Louis Slesin, 17 Jan 2020

The Court of Appeal of Turin confirms the link between a head tumour and mobile phone use
Italy Created: 17 Jan 2020
The Court of Appeal of Turin confirms in a full judgment published on 13 January 2020 (904/2019 of 3-12-2019 , Romeo v. INAIL) the decision of the Tribunal of Ivrea of 2017. Judge Fadda considers that the worker’s acoustic neuroma (benign tumour of the head) was indeed caused by the use of the mobile phone.

According to the Court:

“there is protective scientific jurisprudence that supports the assertion of causation based on criteria of “more likely than not”. P.33.”

And to add:

“Epidemiological data, the results of experiments on animals (not contradicted, at present, by other experiments of the same type), the duration and intensity of exposure … which are particularly important in view of the dose-response relationship established – at the scientific level – between exposure to mobile phone radiofrequencies and the risk of acoustic neuroma, as well as the absence of any other factor which could have caused the disease”.

The scientific analysis by independent experts appointed by the Court confirms the causal link

All the scientific elements of the case were re-examined and re-analysed by two new experts appointed by the Court of Turin (Carolina Marino, Angelo D’Errico). The Court of Appeal fully accepted their conclusions and rejected INAIL’s* appeal, stating that CTU had provided:

“strong evidence to assert a causal role between the complainant’s occupational exposure, his exposure to radiation from mobile phones and the disease that occurred”.

This is the second Italian appeal judgment in favour of a worker after the Brescia judgment in 2010, which concluded with the confirmation of the Supreme Court in 2012, case of Marcolini v. INAIL. In this case, the Court of Bergamo had rejected the application in first instance.
A landmark judgment that will have international repercussions

The Romeo v. INAIL case is therefore historic. It is the first in world judicial history to have had two consecutive judgments in favour of the plaintiff. It is also historic because of the principles underlying this decision and particularly because it is written about the conflicts of interest of certain experts close to the mobile phone industry.
Conflicts of interest and the role of the ICNIRP pinpointed by the Tribunal

Indeed, the Tribunal recognizes that telephone industry-funded scientists, or members of the ICNIRP, are less reliable than independent scientists:

“Much of the scientific literature that excludes carcinogenicity from RF exposure, or at least argues that research to the contrary cannot be considered conclusive… is in a position of conflict of interest, which is not always asserted: see, in particular, on page 94 of the report, the Applicant’s defence (not contested by the other party) that the authors of the studies indicated by INAIL, who are mentioned by name, are members of ICNIRP and/or SCENIHR, which have received, directly or indirectly, funding from industry. P. 33.”

The Turin CTU states:

“It is considered that less weight should be given to studies published by authors who have not declared the existence of conflicts of interest. In this case, conflict of interest situations may arise in relation to the assessment of the effect of radio frequencies on health, for example :
1. cases where the author of the study advised the telephone industry or received funding for studies from the telephone industry
2. if the author himself is a member of the ICNIRP.”

For Dr. Marc Arazi, President of Phonegate Alert:

“Attorney Stefano Bertone’s determined fight to defend the victims of overexposure to our mobile phone waves and the consequences for their health is exemplary. He was one of the first lawyers to take the measure of the revelations linked to the Phonegate scandal. A year ago, together with his law firm and the Italian association APPEL, he and his firm condemned the Italian government to launch major information campaigns on the risks associated with the use of mobile phones. This new decision is all the more important and confirm the need for a moratorium on the deployment of 5G”.

*Istituto Nazionale per l’Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro
Click here to view the source article.
Source: PhoneGate Alert, 15 Jan 2020

Planners refuse 5G phone mast upgrade with 'perception of health effects' raised
United Kingdom Created: 15 Jan 2020
A plan to upgrade a phone mast site for the 5G network at the entrance to a holiday park at Paignton has been refused.

Torbay’s planning committee voted against the application because of the visual impact and perception of health effects of the technology which the park owners warned could damage the business.

The application on behalf of EE and Three was to replace a 13.5m pole with one 20m high and six replacement cabinets.

They wanted to put the new pole and equipment on the opposite side of road from the current installation at the entrance to the Beverley Holidays park in Goodrington Road.

The family-owned business objected to the plan and feared the “eyesore” new mast would put off visitors who might be concerned about the possible health effects of the 5G technology.

Councillors deferred a decision in November for other locations to be considered.

Members of the committee were told on Monday that the developer had rejected four alternative sites.

But they had agreed that the cabinets would be coloured green and the mast would be mostly brown to match telegraph poles.

Claire Flower, a director of Beverley Holidays, objected to the plans and said the owners were extremely concerned about the “detrimental effects” on the business of the large installation at the entrance to the holiday park.

She said the “imposing structure” would be an “absolute eyesore” and there was a concern about the perception of customers, as well as the potential for another increase in the size of the installation in the future.

Ms Flower said the site hosted up to 2,000 people at peak times, mostly families with young children.

Councillors were told that the health effects of the technology were not something they could take into account, but they could consider people’s perceptions and fears of 5G technology, although it would be given low weight at an appeal.

They were told the new installation would operate within international safety guidelines.

Conservative councillor Andrew Barrand said he was disappointed the developer had not been able to agree on one of the alternatives offered and appeared to be behaving “stubbornly”.

Independent Terry Manning said he was concerned that the mast might have an effect on visitors to the holiday park because of their fears of the health effects of 5G.

He said approving the application would set a precedent that developers could put new masts “wherever they want”.

Liberal Democrat Jack Dart said there was no evidence of harm to health and the technology was vital to develop the mobile network.

Liberal Democrat John Dudley said he would find it difficult to support a proposal that could harm a family business.

The committee voted five to four in favour of a proposal from Cllr Manning to reject the application.

The industry is rolling out the 5th generation of mobile phone technology promising faster downloads.

But the higher frequency signal does not travel as far so more base stations are needed and the masts are higher to avoid being blocked by buildings and trees.

Campaigners in Torbay have asked Torbay Council to pause the roll-out of the technology because of health concerns.

They say 5G technology has not been fully tested and studies on animals have shown a link to health effects including an increased risk of cancer.

Public Health England says years of studies of radio waves show the risk of damage to health is unlikely at exposure to levels below internationally agreed limits.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Devon Live, Edward Oldfield, 14 Jan 2020

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