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Radnorshire
Wales Created: 11 Jul 2005
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United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
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Berkshire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
BRACKNELL

Phone mast is a 'gamble with our lives' Jun 30 2005
BRACKNELL campaigners say their health and the look of the neighbourhood will suffer if a 9.7m mobile phone mast is built near their homes.
Phone company T-Mobile wants to place the 3G mast and equipment cabins on land near Harvest Ride's junction with Newell Green in Warfield.
But angry neighbours say the mast is too close to their homes and that there is inconclusive proof that radiation beaming to a surrounding 250 metre radius will not be dangerous to their health.
They are also concerned about the effect on nearby Larks Hill Nature Reserve and dangers the equipment cabins could have for drivers turning out of Newell Green and Harvest Ride.
Daryl Peagram, who lives with wife Edwina in nearby Hemmyng Corner, has founded Warfield Householders Against Masts (WHAM), which has collected 87 signatures for a petition.
The 34-year-old, who is technical director of Winkfield-based recruitment consultants Delta Compliance Ltd, has lobbied Bracknell MP Andrew MacKay and Warfield and Binfield ward borough councillors. He is even considering disabling the signal if all else fails.
Mr Peagram said: "Obviously the best way to stop this mast is to write to the councillors and urge them to reject it.
"But if it does go up and get switched on, I would wait until there is proof from doctors' reports that the mast is affecting health before trying to disable its signal with specialist equip-ment."
He added: "Forty-seven scientific reports say mast radiation causes anything from cancer to infertility. I hope the council will not gamble with our lives that all those scientists are wrong."
Mr Peagram said only one person questioned for the petition needed a 3G signal.
Borough council planners may consider the application at a committee meeting on July 28.
Mr MacKay has written to borough environment and leisure director Vincent Paliczka objecting to the application.
The MP commented: "I share the concerns of local residents who have approached me that this is quite an inappropriate site for a telecommunications mast.
"I believe that the mobile phone operators should get their act together and share masts where there is a limited number of sites to place them."
T-Mobile spokeswoman Sophia Parviez said radiowaves from nearby base stations compared favourably to exposure from distant masts and from TV and FM radio and other transmitters.
She said the company understood the challenge of minimising the environmental impact.
Berkshire News website By Richard Crowe

Buckinghamshire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Wycombe:
Protestors’ delight at mast fight win

OBJECTORS to a controversial phone mast have won their battle against the planning decision that allowed it to go up just metres from their homes.
Residents felt so strongly about the T-Mobile mast in Wycombe Road that they submitted their case for judicial review by the High Court in an
attempt to get the decision quashed.
Homeowner Jennifer Redman, 67, who lives near the mast, was told in February that the value of her home had plummeted by £45,000 since its
arrival.
The mast was approved under delegated powers by Wycombe District Council back in November last year.
But the Free Press can now reveal that the matter has been dealt with outside court, and that both parties have agreed to a consent order,
which will reverse the planning decision.
The case was submitted by leader of the residents, David Reynolds, whose legal team challenged the council decision directly.
He said: "I'll just be happy when they take the mast away. I'm very grateful for the neighbours' support.
"We were right in our position and it took a lot of detective work to actually find the mistakes that should have been exposed by Wycombe."
The decision, which will become official once it is read out in the High Court, means that unless a new planning application by T-Mobile
is successful, the mast will have to be taken down altogether.
T-Mobile refused to comment at this stage or say whether they were planning to resubmit their application.
Lawyers acting for Mr Reynolds claimed that the approval given by the council was flawed, because it failed to take into account
other sites in the area that could have accommodated the mast.
This includes a site at Bencombe Farm which, they claimed, was not sufficiently considered because T-Mobile had looked at incorrect
grid references of the location.
Lawyers were also unhappy that Great Marlow School, in Bobmore Lane, which is just 150 metres from the mast, was not consulted by
the council despite a government report saying that radiation beams of the "greatest intensity" strike the ground between 50 and 200 metres.
In legal arguments, the council said it did take objections into account, including suggestions of other possible sites for the mast.
It also said that in terms of policy, it was not its responsibility to question the need for the mast.
Through their own "standard procedure", they had decided not to contact the school over the application.
Dan Rosenberg, of Public Interest Lawyers, acting for Mr Reynolds, added: "The council did not consult the school, the application
contained inaccuracies and the operator even got grid references of neighbouring masts wrong.
"It is correct that such a decision affecting so many people should be looked at again."
The council has been ordered to pay Mr Reynolds' legal costs as part of the consent order, which he claims could reach around £18,000.
A council spokesman added: "In this instance it was deemed that a speedy and effective resolution should be sought and as such the council
entered into negotiations with all parties to successfully produce the Consent Order."
Enfield Independant. By Nic Brunetti. Monday 20th June 2005
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Milton Keynes
Residents inflamed over mast

A MOBILE phone operator who placed a mast just yards from a nursery, youth club and the local MP's home, has faced fury from residents.
Residents say Hutchison 3G has exploited a loophole in the law which means it can place the mast on top of Olney Fire Station's training tower without planning permission because it is less than 15m tall.
Jeremy Rawlings, the chairman of the neighbouring Olney Youth Club, said: "The way Three have behaved in this matter is totally indefensible because they gave an assurance to Milton Keynes Council they would look at all sites but have gone ahead with it without any consultation."
Hutchison had asked Milton Keynes Council last year for suggestions for sites in the town, but when it gave 28 days notice in April that it was going to place the mast on top of the training tower of the fire station in East Street, the proposal was met with universal opposition.
Milton Keynes Council asked Hutchison to reconsider, and the firm said it would think about it.
Residents thought that was the end of the matter until they saw work starting at the site two weeks ago.
Kevin Viney, who lives on East Street, said: "The loophole is if they put the aerial at the height they wished to, they would have required full planning permission. But by conveniently putting it on a disused structure they did not need to do any more than inform Milton Keynes Planning
Department."
MP Mark Lancaster, who described it as an anomaly in the law, said: "It is ironic it is just yards from my house but I can assure you that Conservative Party policy has not changed since I moved there.
"We think masts like this should require planning permission."
Olney councillor Graham Mabbutt was also furious that Hutchison 3G had ignored the town council's wishes and penned a 10-year contract with Bucks Fire Authority, thought to be worth tens of thousands of pounds.
Cllr Mabbutt said: "What I find unsavoury more than anything is the action of the Bucks Fire Authority not consulting with us or finding out what our policy on it was."
The fire service, which is embarrassed by development, said it will meet with the council and Hutchison 3G.
Gareth Coombes-Olney, Hutchison 3G's corporate affairs manager, said the mast meets safety and technical requirements.
"Hutchison have not done anything wrong, they are entitled to build it," he added.
Milton Keynes Today richard.cooper@mkcitizen.co.uk

Cambridgehire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Addenbrooke’s Hospita defiant over phone masts

Addenbrooke’s Hospital now has around 30 masts on the roof of its main ward block. Departments in close proximity to the masts include the maternity and breast units and the oncology centre. The masts, or base stations, are used for mobile phones, pagers, and the Tetra police radio system, which has also been linked to ill health.
Campaigners are outraged. Mast Sanity spokesperson Karen Barratt argued that the hospital should be looking to find ways to have masts removed from its premises, especially so given its responsibility to patients.
‘I find it extraordinary at a time when everyone is so worried about MRSA that a hospital should be opting to have all these masts on its roof. It is putting not only patients at risk but the surrounding population too,’ she said.
However an Addenbrooke Hospital spokesperson played down the masts, saying: ‘Like many other hospitals and organisations with high buildings, we accommodate masts for mobile phones and other devices on our roof. There are a total of 30 masts on the roof, four of which are used by the BBC, and the remainder by two mobile phone operators.’
She added: ‘We have seen no evidence to suggest that this practice is unsafe. But to ensure the safety of our patients, staff and visitors, we follow government regulations for health and safety and conform with the International Commission on Non-ionising Radiation Protection public exposure guidelines.
‘This includes,’ she said, ‘compelling any company which uses the space for a mast to have a survey done to demonstrate that it will not be exposing the public to risk as a result.
‘A report by the Radiocommunications Agency has shown that, at most, we are 45,000 times below the ICNIRP limit for radio-frequency emissions at the hospital.’
Tom Long, radio communications and planning officer at Cambridge City Council, who oversaw the phone companies’ applications for planning permission, said: ‘If anyone is concerned about emissions from the masts erected near the hospital we can arrange for an independent specialist to use a radiation monitoring meter there.’
However Dr Grahame Blackwell, an independent scientist who advises Mast Sanity, said: ‘The ICNIRP guidelines take no account of possible long-term non-thermal risks on the grounds that no such risks had at the time been officially “established”. But for how many years had smoking been widely recognised as a risk to health before that risk was officially “established”? Every one of the six studies to date on masts shows serious health effects.’
He added that a four-year seven nation EU-funded Reflex study, published last November, stated categorically that cancer-producing effects, at levels within ICNIRP guidelines, were ‘hard facts’.
Dr Blackwell said: ‘It’s no longer true to claim that there are no known mechanisms by which such radiation could cause ill health.’
At Essex University, Prof Elaine Fox is carrying out research into the effects of masts. She said: ‘We simply don’t know at this stage what damage, if any, mobile phone masts cause but a precautionary approach has been recommended. In the meantime I am deeply concerned that a hospital should have not just one mast but 30.’
Dr Stacy Eltiti, senior research officer at the university, is also engaged in the research.
She said: ‘Previous research into masts has been poorly conducted and has often resulted in inconsistent findings. Current research aims to correct this by testing a large number of individuals in well controlled studies.
‘However, these findings will not be available for some time. In the meantime, we should aim to minimise the general public’s levels of exposure to the masts.’
Around 45,000 mast sites have already been established around Britain and another 12,000 applications for sites are expected, to accommodate the new 3G technology. As Karen Barratt points out, ‘each site could have up to 20 masts on it’.
Environmental Health News. Tuesday, May 31 2005

Cheshire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Crewe: Anger at mast plan on housing estate

ANGRY residents have set up their own protest group to fight plans for a 50ft phone mast in the middle of a housing estate in Crewe.
Orange PCS Ltd has applied for planning permission to put up the mast on land owned by Brookhouse Garage in Lewis Street.
But, with some homes just 40 metres away from the proposed site, residents have sent a clear message that they will not tolerate the eyesore.
Brian Roberts, 55, and his wife Sandra have launched the Lewis Street Action Group to protest against the plans.
Mr Roberts, a father-of-six who works as a construction manager, said: 'If you look at the application it is for a 50ft mast with three antennas
and one microwave dish.
'We have to read between the lines and realise that, in an elevated spot like that, more and more equipment is bound to go on to that mast over time.
'You see these kinds of masts in farmers' fields and they seem to grow every time you drive past them.'
Mrs Roberts added residents are unhappy about the notification they received from the borough council.
She said: 'We live just 40 metres away from the mast but neighbours of ours just two or three doors down have received no letter.
'It is quite staggering considering we are talking about a six-storey high mast in the middle of tightly packed rows of terraced housing, that every
resident has not received a letter.
'The swimming baths are approximately 200 metres from this mast. Do the children have to swim under an umbrella of microwaves?'
Crewe and Nantwich Borough Council's planning guidelines indicate all properties within 100 metres of such a development should be notified in
writing.
Planning officer Alan Millington said: 'More than 85 letters were sent out to residents which covered all addresses within 100 metres.
'I have explained to residents that we are under pressure to process applications which is why we have formal consultation periods.
'But I have said I will receive letters right up to the date of the planning committee meeting.'
Formal consultation on the mast application ends on Friday, August 12, with the next meeting of the development control committee scheduled for Monday, August 22.
By Paul Newham, Crewe Chronicle. Aug 3 2005

*******************************************''
Crewe: Fighting back

BATTLING residents are being backed by the borough council in their war against mobile phone masts.
Planning officers are recommending the refusal of applications for masts in three areas from phone companies Vodafone and Hutchison 3G.
The Chronicle revealed last month how hundreds of families had joined forces to prevent a mast being erected in Chapel Lane, Coppenhall.
Within hours of the plan being made public, residents formed protest group Coppenhall Residents Against Masts (CRAM).
CRAM spokesman Patrick Sutton is delighted they are being backed by the planners.
He said: 'I am very pleased and I hope that the planning committee goes ahead next Tuesday and backs the recommendation to refuse the mast.
'The proposed site is 100 metres from the Willow Nursery in Warmingham Road and nearby Monks Coppenhall Primary School
'The mast would be 50ft high and a complete eyesore.
'It would have six antennae, belting out electromagnetic radiation, which so far no-one has been able to say is not harmful.'
Petitions have been put together against mast proposals for Stewart Street in Crewe and Newcastle Road in Shavington.
The application by Vodafone for Stewart Street has prompted hundreds of objections.
Shavington Parish Council has objected to a proposed mast in Newcastle Road, with borough councillor David Brickhill spearheading a campaign to stop one being built at the rear of a residential property.
He said: 'There is fierce opposition to this.'
A council spokesman said: 'In -frastructure has to be located closer to mobile phone users in order to enable the system to work efficiently. However, the proposals conflict with policies in the replacement Local Plan.'
By Jamie Oliver, Crewe Chronicle. May 25 2005
****************************************************
Congleton: Mast plan raises child cancer fear

Concern over children's health
Anxious residents in Congleton are urging the council to reject plans for a mobile telephone mast amid fears for children's health.
Concern is mounting that a built-up area heavily populated by young families could be dangerously exposed to radioactive emissions if a base station
earmarked for a site near the railway station gets the go-ahead.
Although experts have yet to find firm evidence linking telephone masts to illness, the CW12 residents group, which has carried out extensive research
examining the health risks posed by radioactivity, said that children were vulnerable to tumours and even cancer.
The health alert was sounded after telecommunications firm Vodafone confirmed it would be seeking planning permission in the coming weeks to install
a 15m. mast and an equipment cabin outside the Railway Hotel on Biddulph Road.
It comes just months after a Government report advised against mobile 'phone masts being put up near schools.
This week, campaigners were planning to meet borough council leader Roland Domleo to inform him of the health risks involved.
Ian Hawkes, (60), who lives in nearby Fenton Close, has been looking into the effects of radiation on health for the past five years and has written a
booklet warning of the risks.
He said: "I am concerned over the effects the mast would have on the health of the children, as well as the rest of the residents in the neighbourhood.

Evidence
"There is more and more evidence to support D.N.A. damage, tumours, and non-benign cancer being caused. or at least aggravated by, exposure to
this type of radiation.
"It doesn't matter if it's high levels of exposure over a short time or low levels over a long time, in the end the result will be same."
Coun. Domleo vowed to "make sure every concern is considered", although he admitted he could not intervene with the planning procedure at this stage.
"I am surprised at the location of this site, which is why I want to make sure that every concern is fully considered," he said.
"It does concern me that there are people living very close to this site, particularly as health risks associated with telephone masts have not been confirmed
or totally denied."
In a statement, Vodafone said the development "would not have any significant impact on any residential dwellings".
Also responding to residents claims that the mast would be an "eyesore" and a "blight to the community", it added: "Visual impact on the surrounding area
has been kept to an absolute minimum and it is considered that an ultra slim line street works monopole will be an unobtrusive form on the existing land use." Earlier this year widespread public concern prompted the Government to ask experts to investigate possible links between radiation exposure and illness.
The Independent Expert Group on Mobile 'Phones found from extensive research that children's developing nervous systems and thinner skulls made them
likely to be more vulnerable to exposure than adults.
The report, by board chairman Sir William Stewart, also cited E.U.-backed tests which showed radiation was able to damage D.N.A. in human cells and
a Swedish study linking long-term exposure to acoustic neuroma, a benign tumour deemed serious because of its positioning next to the brain.
Congleton, Cheshire www.beartown.co.uk 20.06.05scotthesketh@chronicleseries.com
*********************
Coppenhall. Crewe:
Campaigners claim wins in war on phone masts
RESIDENTS fighting against the rising number of mobile phone masts in Crewe have received a boost from the borough council.
Planning bosses refused permission for a further two masts in the town, while an application for a third was withdrawn, at a meeting of the development control committee meeting on Tuesday.
Residents have been so concerned about the soaring number of masts being erected they formed an action group last month called Coppenhall Residents Against Masts (CRAM).
Vodafone's plans for an 18-metre mast at Stewart Street sparked a flood of 152 objections on grounds that it would present an eyesore devaluing properties, health risks, and the fact that it was not needed as phone receptions are already good.
Planning chiefs refused the application because of visual impact on the area.

An application by Hutchinson 3G for a 15-metre mast at Newcastle Road in Shavington was objected to on grounds of visual intrusion,
health risks and because of its impact on green belt land.
It was refused as it was considered an 'obtrusive feature which would detract from the character, appearance and openness of this green gap location'.

A second application by the same firm, for a 15-metre monopole at Chapel Lane in Coppenahall, met with 85 objections, relating to the invasion of the landscape, health concerns and the fact that there is already a 20-metre mast in the area.
The application was withdrawn, but had been facing refusal.

CRAM spokesman Patrick Sutton said he was delighted with the stance the council had taken on the applications.
He added: "I am very pleased that the council have taken this view and delighted that all the hard work that people have put in has finally paid off.
"I think if they do apply here again they will meet some stiff opposition."
Crewe Guardian 14 06 05

**********************************'''
Coppenhall. Crewe:
Fighting back

BATTLING residents are being backed by the borough council in their war against mobile phone masts.
Planning officers are recommending the refusal of applications for masts in three areas from phone companies Vodafone and Hutchison 3G.
The Chronicle revealed last month how hundreds of families had joined forces to prevent a mast being erected in Chapel Lane, Coppenhall.
Within hours of the plan being made public, residents formed protest group Coppenhall Residents Against Masts (CRAM).
CRAM spokesman Patrick Sutton is delighted they are being backed by the planners.
He said: 'I am very pleased and I hope that the planning committee goes ahead next Tuesday and backs the recommendation to refuse the mast.
'The proposed site is 100 metres from the Willow Nursery in Warmingham Road and nearby Monks Coppenhall Primary School
'The mast would be 50ft high and a complete eyesore.
'It would have six antennae, belting out electromagnetic radiation, which so far no-one has been able to say is not harmful.'
Petitions have been put together against mast proposals for Stewart Street in Crewe and Newcastle Road in Shavington.
The application by Vodafone for Stewart Street has prompted hundreds of objections.
Shavington Parish Council has objected to a proposed mast in Newcastle Road, with borough councillor David Brickhill spearheading a campaign to stop one being built at the rear of a residential property.
He said: 'There is fierce opposition to this.'
A council spokesman said: 'In -frastructure has to be located closer to mobile phone users in order to enable the system to work efficiently. However, the proposals conflict with policies in the replacement Local Plan.'
By Jamie Oliver, Crewe Chronicle. May 25 2005

****************************************************************
Congleton:
Mast plan raises child cancer fear
Mast plan raises child cancer fear

Concern over children's health
Anxious residents in Congleton are urging the council to reject plans for a mobile telephone mast amid fears for children's health.
Concern is mounting that a built-up area heavily populated by young families could be dangerously exposed to radioactive emissions if a base station earmarked for a site near the railway station gets the go-ahead.
Although experts have yet to find firm evidence linking telephone masts to illness, the CW12 residents group, which has carried out extensive research examining the health risks posed by radioactivity, said that children were vulnerable to tumours and even cancer.
The health alert was sounded after telecommunications firm Vodafone confirmed it would be seeking planning permission in the coming weeks to install a 15m. mast and an equipment cabin outside the Railway Hotel on Biddulph Road.
It comes just months after a Government report advised against mobile 'phone masts being put up near schools.
This week, campaigners were planning to meet borough council leader Roland Domleo to inform him of the health risks involved.
Ian Hawkes, (60), who lives in nearby Fenton Close, has been looking into the effects of radiation on health for the past five years and has
written a booklet warning of the risks.
He said: "I am concerned over the effects the mast would have on the health of the children, as well as the rest of the residents in the neighbourhood.

Evidence
"There is more and more evidence to support D.N.A. damage, tumours, and non-benign cancer being caused. or at least aggravated by,
exposure to this type of radiation.
"It doesn't matter if it's high levels of exposure over a short time or low levels over a long time, in the end the result will be same."
Coun. Domleo vowed to "make sure every concern is considered", although he admitted he could not intervene with the planning procedure
at this stage.
"I am surprised at the location of this site, which is why I want to make sure that every concern is fully considered," he said.
"It does concern me that there are people living very close to this site, particularly as health risks associated with telephone masts have not been confirmed or totally denied."
In a statement, Vodafone said the development "would not have any significant impact on any residential dwellings".

Also responding to residents claims that the mast would be an "eyesore" and a "blight to the community", it added: "Visual impact on the surrounding area has been kept to an absolute minimum and it is considered that an ultra slim line street works monopole will be an unobtrusive form on the existing land use."
Earlier this year widespread public concern prompted the Government to ask experts to investigate possible links between radiation exposure and
illness.
The Independent Expert Group on Mobile 'Phones found from extensive research that children's developing nervous systems and thinner skulls made them likely to be more vulnerable to exposure than adults.
The report, by board chairman Sir William Stewart, also cited E.U.-backed tests which showed radiation was able to damage D.N.A.
in human cells and a Swedish study linking long-term exposure to acoustic neuroma, a benign tumour deemed serious because of its
positioning next to the brain.
Congleton, Cheshire www.beartown.co.uk 20.06.05
scotthesketh@chronicleseries.com

Cornwall:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Newquay: Telecoms company wants new column

An application to install a new telecommunications column in a Cornish holiday resort is expected to be approved by Restormel Borough Council.
O2 wants to erect a 36ft (11m) works column with integrated antennas on the eastern edge of Newquay.
Newquay Town Council and nine local residents have objected to the plan over siting and health concerns.
But Restormel Borough Council has said the position of the pole will not have a detrimental effect.
Local people said they were concerned with the strength of the signal emitted from the mast. They also claimed the pole would not blend in with its
surroundings.
Newquay Town Council also objected to the application, saying the site was too close to housing and schools.
But the local planning authority has said it has no objections to the siting and design of the column.
BBC News website 02.08.05
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PHONE MAST GETS GO AHEAD ON APPEAL

An appeal against the refusal of planning permission for a 15-metre high telecommunications mast at Carbis Bay has been upheld.
Hutchinson 3G UK Ltd went to appeal after Penwith Council refused permission for the structure - incorporating three antennae, four dishes and
associated equipment - at Carninney Farm in January.
Planning inspector John Woolcock has agreed that the development can go ahead, subject to a number of conditions.
In explaining how he reached his conclusion, Mr Woolcock said he considered the main issue to be the effect of the proposal on the character
and appearance of the area.
"I have also considered the effects of the proposal on the health and amenity of local residents, and whether there are any available alternative
sites which could provide similar coverage and have less environmental impact," he commented.
Mr Woolcock conceded that the scheme would have an adverse effect on the character of the area.
But he concluded: "I am satisfied that the proposal would, as far as technically feasible, utilise a location which minimises its impact on the
character and amenity of the wider landscape, residential amenity and the setting of the settlement."
He added that there did not appear to be any available alternative sites that would provide similar coverage and have less environmental impact.
The Cornishman Cornwall 09:30 - 04 August 2005
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Sitch given a Cornish pasting
Angry scenes at Tetra meeting

An O2 spokesman was blasted during a public drop-in clinic called by the company to discuss a Tetra mast.
Mawnan resident Ann Brocklehurst interrupted Peter Sitch, from telecommunications company O2 Airware, during an interview with a television crew to declare: "Wait until you drop dead".
She also stood behind him, pointed at him and chanted the Lord's Prayer. She said: "He's so rude. He's causing so many health problems we don't even know about. I am very, very upset about it, that's why I'm here. But Sitch doesn't care. He's an obnoxious character."
Mr Sitch responded by saying: "It's not for me to comment about people's balance, is it?"
The meeting, at Constantine parish hall, was called by O2 Airwave in an attempt to allay the concerns of the public, with many fearing a perceived health risk from the police radio mast. Residents have also expressed doubts over its size and appearance in an Area of Outstanding Beauty.
Two police officers were also there to put forward their views and try to convey to people the benefits the mast would bring.
Chief Inspector Jon Wotton, from the west Cornwall management team, said: "We're not here for O2, we're here to say what the benefits of the system are. The community will benefit from having a new radio system."
He added that Constantine and Zennor were the only two areas in the British Isles not using the system.
He was jointed by Inspector Mark Bolt, from Helston police station, who said: "This is my community, I'm directly responsible for it.
"I've come to offer them support and explain to them the benefits of the system."
However, some residents were unhappy about the way the drop-in clinic was being conducted.
Carmel Hannon said: "I went in, stood in the middle of the room and looked around and I was totally ignored by a group of suited gentleman - so I came out again." Others even refused to go in to the meeting, preferring to show their concerns from outside.
Richard Smith, from Mawnan Smith, said: "Why should I go in there and give them ammunition for their appeal? "Frankly I just find this exercise impertinent - it's an insult to our intelligence. Why ask us to air our concerns when it's a fait accompli?"
For full story see Helston Packet5. Date Published: Wednesday 13 July 2005
************************************************'
Cornwall campaigners wary of 02 Airwave bullies

Tetra mast fighters wary of O2
Anxious residents of Mawnan and Constantine were due to have their fears over Tetra masts answered last night at a public drop-in centre.
Telecommunications company O2, which is responsible for the Tetra mast currently sited at Treworval Farm near Mawnan, held the clinic at
Constantine in an attempt to allay fears over the police radio mast.
When announcing the meeting, Peter Sitch, from O2, said: "It's for people to come in and talk on a one-to-one basis.
There are many people who are obviously confused by some of the more bizarre suggestions."
One of the main causes for concern by residents is the perceived health risk from the waves that are produced by the masts.
O2 is currently appealing against an enforcement notice by Kerrier district council planning committee, following their decision to refuse
retrospective planning permission for the mast in March.
In the past Mr Sitch has described the council as "arrogant" and has said that they could be facing a very large bill.
"We're fully confident that we'll win on this appeal and that we'll also be awarded costs. We always cite costs and we always enforce costs,"
he said when the enforcement notice was served.
However, some residents believe that the meeting was only held so that the company could prove they consulted the public.
Mawnan resident Richard Smith said: "You could be forgiven for thinking this is a little bit too late. This behaviour is impertinent."
The enforcement notice is currently suspended until the outcome of the inquiry, although this could take up to a year.
Falmouth Packet 06.07.05

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Mawnan
Time to meet Tetra company

A PUBLIC drop-in clinic is being held by mobile phone company O2 in an attempt to ease worries over the mast near Mawnan.
Peter Sitch, from O2, said that the clinic would be held in Constantine to allow residents from around the area to come and talk through their fears over the police radio mast which is currently standing at Treworval Farm.
Mr Sitch said: "It's for people to come in and talk on a one-to-one basis. There are many people who are obviously confused by some of the more bizarre suggestions. They need to have the facts put to them, rather than suggestions that have been put forward in at least one leaflet we've seen."
22.06.05

Cumberland:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Carlisle.

PARENTS WILL FIGHT PHONE MAST PLANS

VODAFONE will hold an exhibition tomorrow about its plans to erect a mobile phone mast in the centre of Morton in Carlisle.

The telecommunications giant wants to put up a 10-metre high mast on the pavement outside Morton Community Centre in Wigton Road to provide
3G coverage.
All 50 parents and staff from Manor pre-school in the community centre will fight the plans because they fear the mast will damage their children’s health.
Vodafone did look at another site near the BP Garage in Wigton Road but changed its mind after public opposition and city council advice.
Vodafone will hold the exhibition at Morton Community Church in Stonegarth between 4.30pm until 7.30pm.
After consultation, a planning application will be made.
Published in News & Star on Wednesday, July 27th 2005

*****************************''''
Morton.
More mums battling over mast

Nursery Mums vow to Fight Mast
MORTON mums have vowed to fight planstions and numerous letters of objections in response to its pre-application consultation for a 10-metre high mast on the Wigton Road pavement outside Morton Community Centre.
All 50 parents at Manor pre-school in the centre have signed a petition to try and stop the mast because of fears that it could damage their children’s health.
Nursery manager Judith Leathers said: “It has not been proven that there would be no detrimental effects to the children.
“It is not just the nursery, there are two schools very close by.
“Staff and parents here will do everything we can to stop this.”
Vodafone recently abandoned plans to site the mast a few hundred metres away behind the BP Garage in Wigton Road after hundreds signed a petition against it.
The company was advised by Carlisle City Council in February that the site outside the centre was the best of the options put forward.
When Val Young, of Wyvern Close, received a consultation letter, she launched yet another petition, collecting 218 signatures from the estate.
She said: “My first thought was for the safety of the children. I am totally against these masts in built-up urban areas.
“When the first site was suggest, I signed a petition against it and now they have moved it to almost opposite my house.”
A spokesman for Vodafone said: “We respect people’s views but at the same time, we have to do our utmost to provide this service to people.”
The mast would bring 3G coverage to the Morton area.
An application for prior approval is due to be submitted to Carlisle City Council,
which will have 56 days to make a decision.
02.07.05

Derbyshire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Derbyshire RESIDENTS' FURY OVER MAST PLANS

Residents say that they are furious about plans to put up a second mobile phone mast close to their homes.
Alvaston residents are fighting plans by mobile phone company O2 to install a 15-metre-high mast and two equipment cabins at the junction of
Holbrook Road and Boscastle Road.
The application, which has been submitted to Derby City Council, comes days after T-Mobile put up a 12.2-metre mast and three cabins just metres away,
in Holbrook Road at its junction with Holt Avenue.
Nicole Berrisford (43), of Holt Avenue, fears that the masts will pose a health risk, as well as being visually intrusive, which will eventually lead to
a devaluation of properties in the area.
Along with her neighbours, she also thinks that the area is becoming far too cluttered with too much street furniture.
She said: "I'm going to do a flyer informing people about O2. I'm trying to call a meeting, organise a petition and, if necessary, a rally.
"I think it's getting beyond a joke now.
"Our main concern is that it's directly on a route to Oakwood Infant and Junior schools and Noel-Baker Community School.
"There could be health risks and it will devalue the houses. No-one wants to buy a house near a phone mast and there'll be two here."
Frank Berridge (53), of Holbrook Road, says that the area is already blighted by graffiti and feels that the new addition will only worsen the problem.
He said: "These masts are near old people's homes and on a main school route.
"For old people, if they can't see very well, they're also going to be more obstacles for them."
Pamela Robinson (60), also of Holbrook Road, said: "It's getting really cluttered. Everything's here and it's just awful.
"They'll get daubed by graffiti and it'll make the street look ugly. There's just too much clutter."
A council spokeswoman said that the application did not require planning permission but the company was required to inform the council, which then
has 56 days to agree to its siting and design
Derbyshire Evening Telegraph. BY KAREN HOLT. - 26 August 2005
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Derbyshire SCHOOL MAY ACT ON MAST MUDDLE

Governors at a Normanton school could take action over mobile phone masts which have been installed nearby.
The issue has been brought to people's attention after Derby City Council granted permission for mobile phone provider O2 to put up a 75m tower with
three antennae on the roof of New Normanton Mills, in Stanhope Street, on July 29.
The two-storey building, which contains factories, already has two towers and three antennae for telecoms equipment.
Campaigners say that new guidelines concerning notification of schools should have been taken into account before the latest decision was made.
But the planning department said it did notify the correct people, sending out 108 letters to residential properties within 90m and schools within 200m.
These included Hardwick Primary School, in Hastings Street, which the council said was sent a letter on July 5.
But parents were not informed of the plans because the school's head teacher and governing body say they never received the letter.
Head teacher Sushma Sehmbi said: "I wasn't aware of it. Had we known we would have informed our parents. Stanhope Street is very close to the
school.
"If masts are close to the school and they are a risk then it does concern us.
"When we go back to school after the summer holiday we will take up the issue with the governors.
They could consider whether they want to take it up with the council.
"We will let the parents know by writing to them."
School governor Andrea Luscombe (38), who has a nine-year-old son, Lee Russell, at the school, said:
"It's quite concerning that the mast is so close to the school, when there could be health risks.
"I didn't even know there were any masts there."
Ms Luscombe, of St James' Road, said the issue of mobile phone masts would be considered by the governors.
Dorothy Skrytek, of Crewe Street, said that under the latest information from the Stewart Report on mobile phone and health produced by the
Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones, school governors should be consulted on proposals for masts near schools.
"As far as I know there was no consultation. I sent out leaflets through people's doors letting them know, but the council had already granted permission."
An O2 spokesman added: "All of O2's mobile phone masts operate well within international safety guidelines."
Derbyshire Evening Telegraph. BY PAULA FENTIMAN. - 24 August 2005
************************************************''
SCIENTISTS MUST SETTLE THIS DEBATE

Chellaston Residents' Association member Philip Ingall may well be raising a whole host of unfounded
objections to plans for a new mobile phone mast in his suburb (Opinion, Page 4).
Or he could be highlighting a potentially deadly danger to his family, his neighbours and future generations.
The point is, we haven't a clue what the situation is.
The months and years go by, and every application for a phone mast, be it in city, village or countryside, is
met with concern, anger and general opposition from people in the neighbourhood.
And this totally unsatisfactory state of affairs will remain the case until we get an assurance from an unbiased
and credible scientific source that no health risk is posed by the radio waves which these things emit.
The Government's Advisory Group on Non-Ionising Radiation carried out three years of research into possible harmful effects.
Its report came out 19 months ago. It stated it could find no evidence to justify health fears - but then clambered back on to the fence by announcing more research was needed before any final conclusions could be reached.
And in that state of limbo we remain.
So, regardless of whether these phone masts are 12, 15 or 30 metres high, or if they are disguised as a petrol station sign or a Christmas tree, the objections will continue.
Resolve the health-risk debate, and then the siting of these masts can become a straightforward planning issue.
Derbyshire Evening Telegraph. - 23 August 2005
***********************************************'''
RESIDENTS ANGRY AT DISGUISED MAST PLAN

A Mobile phone firm has angered residents by proposing to erect a telecommunications mast disguised as a telegraph pole.

Neighbours believe the Vodafone mast would be put in a bad position, despite its disguise, as they are worried about the health implications.
The timber-clad mast is planned for land near Ladywood Primary School, Oliver Road, Kirk Hallam, and residents are worried as it will be near homes
on Goole Avenue and Queen Elizabeth Way.
Goole Avenue resident Derek Espie said: "It's very close to the school and we're all worried."
Vodaphone said the 12-metre high aerial is needed to improve their service. Officials have written to the school as well as local people and they
said there are no health dangers.
A spokeswoman said: "Our job is to have a balance between making sure we minimise visual impact and still provide a service to local people."
Derbyshire Evening Telegraph. 20 August 2005
********************************************''
Derby
Residents protest against the masts

Residents in Derby have staged a march against plans for two new mobile phone masts in their communities.
They walked between the war memorial on Shelton Lock Green and the Red Lion pub in Chellaston.
Protestors said the masts for Vodaphone were going to be positioned in inappropriate places close to the junior school and the war memorial.
Planning permission has been granted for the firm to erect a mast on the junction of Derby Road and the Parkway.
The second site on the green has yet to be given approval.
The residents were joined on their march by the South Derbyshire MP, Mark Todd.
BBC i 30.07.05

*************************************************'''
MAST PROTEST ON THE MARCH

An action group opposed to plans for a mobile phone mast will parade through the streets of Chellaston and Allenton this weekend to highlight its cause.
The Mast Action Committee, part of Chellaston Residents' Association, is fighting plans for a Vodafone mast at the junction of Parkway and Derby Road,
outside the Red Lion pub.
Vodafone has already been given the go-ahead by Derby City Council for the 12-metre mast as it did not need full planning permission because it was
less than 15 metres high.
Now protesters have discovered that Vodafone is planning to apply to the city council for prior approval for another 12-metre mast in Merrill Way,
Allenton, near the War Memorial Village.
On Saturday they are taking to the streets to protest against the proposed Allenton mast and to try to stop the Chellaston mast.
The protesters are meeting on the green at the War Memorial Village at 10am and will set off from there at 10.30am, travel along Chellaston Road
and Derby Road to reach the Red Lion pub at 11.30am.
The protesters are appealing for a marching band and cheerleaders to join in to help them make some noise and marshals to help it run smoothly.
Mast Action Committee member Philip Ingall, of St Peter's Road, Chellaston, said: "We want to show Vodafone that we're growing and we'll fight any
application that's made in an unsuitable location.
"The parade will cause some traffic disruption and I am sorry for that. Don't blame us, blame Vodafone for proposing to build masts in unsuitable locations."
Earlier this month the committee held a protest outside Chellaston Junior School, in Maple Drive, to warn parents about the mast in Chellaston.
But Vodafone said it would still continue with the plans.
The mast would be about 100m away from the junior school and 200m from Chellaston Infant School, in School Lane.
200 people have signed a petition against the mast.
A Vodafone spokeswoman confirmed that the company was consulting ward councillors about the site in Allenton.
The mast would be for both 2G and 3G technology to improve coverage for voice calls as well as new technology such as picture messaging.
She added: "There is a tentative proposal for a mast at that site.
Now is the time for people to give us their views."
Derbyshire Telegraph. BY SUZANNE HARROP. - 26 July 2005
**********************************************

TOUGH STANCE CERTAIN TO BE CHALLENGED

New city council leader Chris Williamson has now adopted the most aggressive stance against mobile phone masts yet seen from
within our corridors of power.
The Labour chief says he has instructed the authority's legal department to explore what measures are open to residents to fight planning
applications from mobile phone companies.
He wants to show protesting residents "that they have the support of the city council" - a remarkable blanket commitment.
It will raise a few eyebrows because, up and down the land, planning officers have been sadly shaking their heads and saying that
regulations leave them powerless to oppose plans for masts which are under 15 metres high.
If that is indeed the law of the land, then Mr Williamson may have to restrict his fight to the higher masts.
And, even then, he can expect to be challenged to name the sites within the city which he would deem acceptable as mast sites.
For, however electorally- damaging that would be, these things have to be put up somewhere if millions of people are to enjoy the benefit of
their mobile phones.
Of course, if scientists were able to unequivocally answer the question which has been troubling people for years - do masts pose a health risk?
- the issue would become more clear-cut.
If the answer is yes, then it is back to the drawing board and people would just have to find some other means of annoying fellow bus and train
passengers and dicing with death behind the steering wheels of their cars.
And if they are given a clean bill of health, we'll just have to accept the phone masts as an unsightly but necessary evil.
Unless, that is, Mr Williamson is prepared to risk the wrath of Derby's phone-users and insist he is going to block all plans for masts...
Derbyshire Telegraph. 09:30 - 01 August 2005

**********************************'
Codnor: Residents say mast should go

CODNOR residents are demanding that a mobile telephone mast is taken down.
Planning permission for the mast near Codnor Market Place expired last year, but the 15ft pole is still standing.
An application to renew planning permission for the mast until December 2009 was made at the end of last year, but councillors deferred making a decision until further investigations had been carried out.
Now seven months later, no decision has been made and residents are calling for the mast to come down.
This week Amber Valley Borough Council said they were still looking into the legality of the mast remaining on the site.
Angry Mill Lane resident Shelia Jackson said: "It shouldn't take this long, it's taking forever to get the mast down."
At the planning meeting in November, councillors related back to a planning application approved earlier in the year for a trellis mast on the same site.
Councillors believed when they approved the trellis mast that it would reduce the number of individual masts on the site as mast sharing was possible.
However, phone company O2 claimed mast sharing was not an option, stating: "The lattice tower is not capable of supporting a third operator without further redevelopment."
Amber Valley's planning executive, Robert Reid, supported the deferral of the decision, adding: "There is merit in investigating whether the phone operators can go together on the new trellis mast."
Jessop Street resident Cliff Jones is angry with the delay, he said: "They are just dragging their feet. The mast should have been taken down months ago. We want it down and down now.
"Decisions about mast sharing should have been sorted before the lattice tower was granted planning permission."
The Derbyshire Times. By Stephen Sinfield. 16 June 2005

*******************************************************************'
Chesterfield

Voters say 'no' to mast
People power looks set to cut off plans for a controversial mobile mast near homes in a mid-Derbyshire village.
Orange has planning permission from NE Derbyshire District Council to site a mast only 300 metres from a school in Wessington at Nethergreen Farm, Moorwood Moor Lane.
But after protests from villagers the landowners – four members of the Eason family – decided to put the matter to a public vote.
Fifty locals turned up at the Three Horseshoes Pub for a referendum on whether the mast should go ahead – and landlord Scott Brown said the answer was a resounding 'no'.
Mr Brown said: "The Easoms have been very good about this. They have said they will consider the views of the villagers.
"But they can't get back to us this week as they are silaging and cannot stop. We understand that, they have a business to run. We hope to hold a meeting with them very soon."
Last month Mr Brown vowed to leave the village if the 17m mast, with six antennae and four microwave dishes, was erected. He and other villagers were worried that the radiowaves were a health risk to the children.
Villagers were asked to vote whether to support the original plan, to choose from sites 400, 500 or 700 metres away from the school and village green or to decide not to have a mast at all. The villagers voted to do without a mast altogether.
Orange has planning permission from NEDDC to site the mast in the original position.
They and the landowners came up with a second possible site for the mast, the 400 metres option, but this has also been turned down by the villagers.
A spokeswoman for Orange said the mast conformed to strict government guidelines and no link between masts and ill-health had been established.
Chesterfield Today. charlotte.white@derbyshiretimes.co.uk 02 June 2005

Devon:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Whipton:
OPPOSITION GROWS TO MAST NEAR THREE SCHOOLS AND HOMES

Nearly 500 people have signed a petition against the building of a phone mast near their homes. As previously reported in the Echo, Hutchinson 3G
want to build the 12-metre-high mast in Whipton, on the junction of Leypark Road and Hill Barton Road.
There is widespread opposition to the development because, as well as being near thousands of homes, the mast is near three schools, a
children's home and a children's centre.
In addition, the new St Luke's High School, being built beside Hill Barton Road, will be a few metres away from the mast.
Many parents living in the area are worried about having a mobile phone mast near their homes. Catherine Hill, Parent Forum co-ordinator for Sure Start,
which provides services for children in the Whipton area, said: "I am opposed to the mast because it is a worry, and so are parents. I know lots have
signed the petition.
"There are already quite a lot of masts in Whipton I think parents are just worried about the lack of information on how they affect health."
Laurence Davey, one of the founders of Whipton Agai-nst Masts (WAM), said opposition to the mast was spreading.
"Lots of local shops and businesses have displayed our petitions and we have now collected 487 signatures from residents opposing the mast," he said.
"More than 318 residents have written letters of objection to the council too"
Mr Davey will speak out on behalf of residents at a council planning meeting on July 25.
Peter Edwards, councillor for Whipton, also said he would argue against the mast at the same committee meeting.
Hutchinson 3G have meanwhile released more details about the mast. How much of its 20-watt output would be directed towards homes and schools would depend on the alignment of its three antennae. One would face towards Whipton, one towards Heavitree and the third in the direction of Sowton Industrial
Estate and the Met Office.
Mike Dobson, community affairs manager for Hutchinson 3G, said: "We have to be as close to residential areas as possible so we can give the best possible coverage.
We had considered the Texaco garage in Honiton Road, but the owner refused.
"We also considered Rennes House, but Exeter City Council advised us they didn't want us to put it there.
"As a company, we try to put masts on existing structures to minimise the impact."
The mast would be built on Highways Agency-owned land.
This means the county council will be informed of Hutchinson 3G's plans to built the mast if Exeter City Council grants them planning permission.
BY KERRA MADDERN Express and Echo Devon. - 15 July 2005
*******************''''
Exeter :
Council leaders try to block more masts on roof
CALL TO BLOCK ANTENNAS BID
City leaders are to try to block a bid to install more mobile phone equipment on Exeter's biggest block of council flats.
Telecommunications gi-ant O2 is applying for permission to expand its range of equipment on top of Rennes House in Whipton.
The roof at the city council-managed 10-storey-high block is already home to several mobile phone antennas and is close to Whipton Barton
First and Middle Schools.
O2 and another operator have had leases with the city council for their existing equipment since 1997.
But city council leader Roy Slack says health fears expressed by Rennes House residents must be taken into account.
He is recommending fellow members of the authority’s executive committee refuse O2’s bid when they meet next Tuesday.
He said: “When mobile phones first appeared, people were quite relaxed about the equipment that was needed to make these phones work.
“Now people are much more cautious and we think that the operators should think very carefully before installing equipment in very
sensitive locations.
“I am concerned for the residents of Rennes House who already have a lot of equipment on the roof.
“Although there is no evidence of any significant health harm, we want to allay their fears by putting a stop to further growth in the
amount of equipment installed.”
The Echo’s Shock Waves campaign has been calling for an independent investigation into concerns over the potential health risks of
emissions from mobile phone masts.
It was launched in 2002 after the discovery of a cluster of four cancer cases near a mast in Crediton owned by communications company Orange, which claims its mast is safe.
Exeter City Council has refused planning permission for mobile phone masts before, citing local health fears, but has lost on appeal.
Government planning guidelines say health fears cannot be used as grounds for objection if the masts emit at lower-than-recognised international guidelines.
However, in the case of Rennes House, the city council would be acting in its capacity as the leaseholder and not the local planning authority.
Pensioner Barbara Escott, who has lived in Rennes House for 28 years, said: “We don’t need any more of this equipment on the roof.
“We used to have our washing lines on the roof. Now you can’t go up there and it is full of this stuff.
“We don’t know how it is affecting our health now so I don’t want any more of it.”
Terry Millan, a Rennes House resident of 24 years, added: “I would like to see all of the equipment up there taken away now.
A lot of people complain of being ill around here. You do wonder if it is to do with the mast.
“I would welcome any attempt by the council to stop more equipment being put up there.”
Exeter Express and Echo 17.06.05

*******************************************
PHONE MAST REFUSED

Residents cheered when councillors refused a mobile phone mast on a Witham estate.
Witham Area Committee rejected an application from Hutchison 3G for a mast off Spa Road, opposite Powers Hall Junior and Infants School.
Planning officers recommended approval.
Exeter Gazette. - 16 June 2005

*****************************************************
Exeter
COUNCIL WON'T BUY MASTS KIT

Mobile phone mast emission metering equipment is to be struck off Exeter City Council's shopping list. The council's executive decided two years ago to set aside £25,000 to spend on hi-tech mast monitoring gear.
The decision to buy the equipment was made amid widespread public unease at the health impact of masts.
Public concern about the issue has been highlighted by the Echo's Shockwaves campaign, which is calling on the Government to fund more research into mast emissions.
But now the council's environmental health officials say they do not believe there is any real benefit to be gained from monitoring masts.
A report to the council's community scrutiny committee said the equipment would be used to monitor emissions that are established to be well within the safety limits.
At the meeting, Jayne Donovan, the council's head of environmental health services, said: "It is clear that if the council measured mast emissions the results would be very similar to levels monitored nationally.
"The emissions we would get would be likely to be below international guidelines.
"In my opinion, there would be very limited uses of the information and the results would not be able to provide any meaningful health protection tool.
"However, we will continue to keep abreast of research and other developments in the field."
The committee voted to recommend that the council's executive should support the move not to buy the monitoring equipment.
Conservative city councillor Norman Shiel, the deputy chairman of the committee, said: "I support this recommendation. It would be gesture politics to spend taxpayers' money on this monitoring equipment."
Exeter Express and Echo. BY BEN NORMAN. 09 June 2005

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