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Staffordshire:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
COUNCIL SUPPORTS MOBILE MAST MAP

Plans to draw up a map showing mobile phone operators where mast applications will not be welcome in Newcastle moved a step closer last night.
The proposals received the backing of councillors at a scrutiny meeting. They were asked to consider nine recommendations put forward by the Telecommunications Working Party.
All councillors at the meeting agreed there was the need to identify designated areas for the installation of phone masts.
John Macmillan, chairman of the working party, said: "We set this party up because the current legislation didn't seem too clear.
A number of masts kept coming through consistently one after the other. We've got concerns about these masts. We want to try and do something about it."
Other recommendations which were highlighted included the impact a number of closely sited masts would have and the idea of masts sharing a site.
Conservative leader Simon Tagg said councillors should be given detailed information at planning meetings from operators who disagree with sharing sites.
After the meeting Mr Tagg said: "We want more evidence stated in planning reports to councillors for reasons why mast sharing is not an option.
The way around this is of course network roaming.
One mast could be used by all mobile users, then there's no need for all the companies to have there own mast in the area leading to multiple masts. "
Other working party recommendations were that operators should consult annually with the local planning authority, the design of masts and equipment
should fit in with the surrounding area and all applications for masts should be determined by the planning committee. The recommendations will be passed
onto the borough council's cabinet.
This is Staffordshire.- 27 July 2005
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Lichfield: Uproar at new phone mast plan

A new phone mast has been proposed in south Lichfield, The Chronicle can reveal.
T-Mobile wants to put a 12 metre mast on the corner of Shortbutts Lane and Birmingham Road to serve the south west of the city.
The mobile phone giant has investigated eight sites in south Lichfield where it considered putting masts to improve its 3G service.
The Shortbutts Lane proposal comes months after a similar plan for a mast in Sainte Foy Avenue was abandoned following criticism from residents,
councillors and developers. But Staffordshire County Councillor for Lichfield South, Terry Finn, said this proposal was not better.
"What a place to try and put it," he said. "I don't know where they are coming from."
T-Mobile said the proposed mast, on a wide grass verge adjacent to a busy road and trees, was the best of the eight options they considered in the area.
But the company revealed the site was only given an amber suitability rating under national guidelines because it was within 50 metres of people's houses.
Councillor Finn said that was too close, especially with the new 175 new home development on the former Bison Concrete site off Shortbutts Lane now
under way.
"It's extremely close to people's houses. There would be quite a few houses within 50 metres," said the county councillor.
"I think it's awful. It's the gateway to the city - it's welcome to Lichfield with a telephone mast."
"I can't understand why they have to have them so near to the houses."
Councillor Finn added that any new masts for 3G coverage should be mounted on existing poles.
Alan Begley, who formed the Boley Park Action Group to stop a planned mast in Darnford Lane, said the Shortbutts Lane proposal was "totally unacceptable" because it was near houses and King Edward VI School.
By Stuart Pollitt Litchfield and Burntwood Chronicle. Jul 22, 2005,
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MOBILE MAST APPEAL
A Planning inspector has been called in to rule whether a mobile phone mast should be installed opposite a village shop.
T-Mobile has appealed against the refusal of its application for a 12-metre mobile phone mast opposite the Spar Shop in Clayton Road, Clayton, to the
planning inspectorate.
The company made the move after borough councillors in Newcastle ignored the advice of planners to refuse permission for the mast because it would
harm the character of the area.
Mother-of-three Gillian Powell, of Lincoln Avenue, was outraged by the mast proposal, fearing possible health risks associated with the equipment.
She said her bid to keep mobile phones away from her children until they are teenagers will be defeated if the mast is put so close to their home.
Mrs Powell said: "I didn't even know they could appeal, so I was totally gob-smacked when I was told. It seems as if we've wasted our time because it
doesn't look as if the company is particularly bothered that local people don't want it. I just hope the Planning Inspectorate takes our petition into account and hopefully they'll receive some more letters of protest."
Rene Bosley, of Thirlmere Place, Clayton, organised a 291-name petition against the Clayton mast and thought she had seen the last of the plans.
She said: "I'm very disappointed. We thought that with the committee turning it down then we wouldn't have any worries over this one.
A lot of people are apathetic but the number of people who signed the petition shows the strength of feeling there is against it."
Clayton councillor Ann Heames said: "I'm not very happy about this because nobody wants the mast. I'd urge everybody to write in against it, as this
might be their only opportunity to have a say."
In making the application T-Mobile said such masts are needed to improve the service.
A company spokesman said: "T-Mobile operates a low power radio network and our base stations therefore need to be located in the areas
they are required to serve.
"Increasingly, people are also using mobiles in their homes and this means we need to position base stations in or close to residential areas.

"The site in question is in a commercial area, as far away from houses as possible in the neighbourhood.
T-Mobile is satisfied that its mobile base stations, operating within national and international guidelines, are safe and do not present health risks to
any member of the public."
* Residents can send their comments, before September 16, to the Planning Inspectorate, 3/07 Kite Wing, Temple Quay House, 2 The Square,
Bristol, BS1 6PN, quoting reference APP/P3420/A/05/1186362.
This is Staffordshire. EMMA FITZGERALD. 20 August 2005 . emma.fiztgerald@thesentinel.co.uk


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3 NEW PHONE MASTS

Plans for three phone masts have been given the go-ahead.
Newcastle Borough Council's planning committee last night agreed with officers' recommendations to approve the three masts and refuse a
fourth near Bradwell Lodge.
T-Mobile had resubmitted plans for a 14.7-metre pole with equipment cabinets on the pavement 75 metres from the side of the lodge, in High Street, Porthill.
It follows the refusal of a similar application made by the company in February. The plans that were approved include a proposal by Orange for
a 15-metre mast with three antennas and a microwave dish at Newcastle and Hartshill Cricket Club, in Stafford Avenue, Newcastle,
and a 20-metre pole at Bower End Farm, in Bower End, Madeley, to replace an existing 17-metre pole.
Vodafone's application to build a 12-metre mast with antennas and two cabinets at Mount Road, Kidsgrove, was also approved.
The Sentinel Newcastle. - 20 July 2005
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NEWCASTLE COUNCIL SUPPORTS MOBILE MAST MAP

Plans to draw up a map showing mobile phone operators where mast applications will not be welcome in Newcastle moved a step closer last night.
The proposals received the backing of councillors at a scrutiny meeting. They were asked to consider nine recommendations put forward by the Telecommunications Working Party.

All councillors at the meeting agreed there was the need to identify designated areas for the installation of phone masts.

John Macmillan, chairman of the working party, said: "We set this party up because the current legislation didn't seem too clear.
A number of masts kept coming through consistently one after the other. We've got concerns about these masts. We want to try and do something about it."

Other recommendations which were highlighted included the impact a number of closely sited masts would have and the idea of masts sharing a site.

Conservative leader Simon Tagg said councillors should be given detailed information at planning meetings from operators who disagree with sharing sites.

After the meeting Mr Tagg said: "We want more evidence stated in planning reports to councillors for reasons why mast sharing is not an option.
The way around this is of course network roaming. One mast could be used by all mobile users, then there's no need for all the companies to have there own mast in the area leading to multiple masts. "

Other working party recommendations were that operators should consult annually with the local planning authority, the design of masts and equipment
should fit in with the surrounding area and all applications for masts should be determined by the planning committee. The recommendations will be passed
onto the borough council's cabinet.
This is Staffordshire. - 27 July 2005
Phil Watts
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Harrowgate
02 rejected

Now phone mast battle moves to Oatlands area
A SECOND bid within months to site a mobile phone mast nearly 20ft tall on top of a building in the Oatlands area has been rejected by planners.
A 22ft tall mast had already been turned down by Harrogate Borough Council planners.
The new application by 02 (UK) Ltd at Harrogate Leisure Centre on Hammerain House at Hookstone Avenue-Beech Avenue sparked objections from residents, the Oatlands Anti-Mast Campaign and ward councillor Fred Willis (Con, Pannal).
Coun Willis said the mast would have been sited close to homes in Halstead Road, Mount Gardens and part of Hookstone Avenue.
"It would simply have towered over a number of homes and back gardens. Residents would have suffered intrusion of their residential space which would have severely impacted on regular use of their back gardens," he said.
The Oatlands Anti Mast group said some residents already lived in the shadow of several low level masts put up six years ago on Hammerain House.
If the latest application was granted,they would have a tall mast in their view each day.
The application was refused by by the council's Head of Planning Services and area planning committee chairman Coun Michael Harrison (Con Killinghall).
Coun Willis said a sensible decision had been reached.
Residents expressed the hope that 02(UK) Ltd would not consider returning with a third application for the site.
Harrowgate news

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Stafford:
Town facing masts plague

Up to six giant phone masts could soon be erected in the Stafford area, the Express & Star can reveal.
Telecommunications giant O2 has lodged plans with Stafford council for a 15-metre mast on the A34/M6 link road, near Creswell; a 12.5-metre column in Prospect Road, Littleworth, and a 17.5-metre monopole in coppice land, off Beaconside.
Applications have also been submitted for a six-metre column on land owned by Network Rail just off the A513 at Milford, near Shugborough, and a 12.5-metre mast with dish and antennae on railway land, near Holdiford Road, off Tixall Road, Milford.
The borough council has also applied to site a two-metre high mast over Stone Town Council's offices in Station Road, Stone. Angry residents and councillors in Creswell have vowed to fight plans to site what would be a fourth mast within 50 metres of their homes.
There are already three mobile phone masts on land at the Prime Point site close to the M6 at Creswell.
Seighford ward councillor Mark Winnington, who represents the area, said he was worried about research linking mobile phone masts with health problems. "This is yet another application to site a mast just 50 yards away from people's homes," he said.
"I have read a great deal of information about mobile phone masts and there is so much worrying research out there - it can't all be wrong."
Councillor Winnington said he would call the application in due to "visual impairment". "This stretch of road is a major gateway into Stafford for visitors and it would be ruined by an unsightly mast," he said.
Creswell Parish Council clerk, Tom Doubtfire, said residents would again be joining forces to fight the plans.
"There is an increasing amount of research linking mobile phone masts to health problems," he said.
Six masts already exist in and around Stafford town centre.
Three are based just metres apart on side roads just off Greengate Street.
Jul 2, 2005, 08:30 Staffordshire Express and Star

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Lichfield
Mast group warns phone giant

Protesters have declared war on a mobile phone giant after city councillors backed their campaign against erecting a towering mast near their Lichfield homes.
Members of Stowe Concerned Residents Against Masts (SCRAM) have vowed to fight until the bitter end to see T Mobile's plans for a 15-metre telecommunications pole in Eastern Avenue scrapped.
The group is one step closer to winning its battle after Lichfield City Council supported its concerns.
Members fear the mast could spark health problems among residents and pupils attending Charnwood County Primary School, Purcell Avenue, and would be an eyesore.
Campaigners have launched a high profile protest in a bid to have the controversial scheme thrown out.
They have taken to the streets to drum up support for their campaign and have now mounted a petition.
The group has also visited 170 houses surrounding the site to encourage people to send letters of objection to Lichfield District Council.
The authority will make a final decision on the scheme next month.
SCRAM Chairman David Brain said he was delighted the group had won the battle and said members would fight until it had also won the war.
"We are very pleased the council has supported our campaign and would have been very shocked if there had been any other decision.
"The site is clearly inappropriate as it is too close to houses and the school. We are determined to fight these plans and will protest until the end."
Mr Brain added: "I would urge people to write to the council highlighting their concerns over this application. We need to leave no doubt of the strength of feeling in the community - we do not want this mast."
By Michelle Hunt Jun 29, 2005,

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Stoke-on-Trent:
Phone mast plan for football club

Port Vale Football Club is to save £80,000 on the cost of a floodlight by agreeing to host a mobile telephone mast at Vale Park.
O2 wants to put up the mast attached to the new floodlight, between the Railway Paddock and Hamil Road End stands.
The telecoms company came to an agreement with the club after Stoke-on-Trent College opposed plans to upgrade a mast on its Burslem campus.
The city council has yet to rule on O2's planning application.
Ash Connor, chairman of the Port Vale Supporters Trust, told BBC News: "Attitudes to mobile phone masts have mellowed with some of the reassurances recently that they are safe.
"But there are certainly some supporters against the principle of it.
"I would certainly side with people living near the club and not want the mast."
Port Vale installs mobile mast to finance new floodlights Jun 2 2005
BBC News Online 1St June 2005

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Port Vale Football Club is adding a second mobile phone mast to its ground to help to pay for new floodlighting.
The 24-metre high mast, comprising of six antenna, will be fixed on a new 34 metre floodlight pylon at the Vale Park ground.
Permission for the 3G mast was granted yesterday by Stoke on Trent City Council Development and Control Committee.
Port Vale club secretary, Bill Lodey, said they had received no letters of complaint about mobile phone equipment already installed at the ground, or protests about their plans for more.
But a spokeswoman for campaign group Mast Sanity claimed the profusion of masts in built up regions presented health risks to vulnerable sections of society.
Mr Lodey said the club had received planning permission four years ago to install a mast at the ground but the telecommunications company involved had changed its mind.
He said O2 had "come to an agreement" with the club to part finance the cost of installing the new floodlights in return for mobile phone equipment being housed there.
" We already have equipment on the floodlight tower we are replacing. It has been with us for two years and we haven't had any adverse letters or phone calls now or in the past. There is mobile phone equipment all over the maternity hospital roof."
Birmingham Post

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BURTON.

MP JANET BACKING PHONE MAST FIGHT

BURTON’S MP has backed villagers involved in a dispute with a telecommunications company over the installation of a mobile phone mast.
Janet Dean MP has contacted phone giant 02 about the siting of a controversial mast in Stretton.
The company sparked outrage on Monday after contractors began to lay the foundations for a mast in Hillfield Lane, Stretton.
East Staffordshire Borough Council approved a planning application for the mast in January, despite more than 50 objections from residents concerned about health risks.
However at the time the firm agreed to look for an alternative site and said it would notify the council if any work was to begin. It did not do this before contractors began laying the mast’s foundations earlier this week.
Work was halted on the mast in Hillfield Lane on Tuesday and 02 said that a change of contractors meant the work had mistakenly gone ahead.
Mrs Dean said she had telephoned the chief executive of 02 on Tuesday after work had begun on the site.
She said: "I know from Councillor Ron Clarke that residents remain concerned because the company are not at the moment removing the foundations that have been installed.
"While I can understand the reluctance of

02 to remove the foundations until a new site is agreed, I have pressed 02 for reassurances. In particular, I have asked for confirmation that even though planning permission has been obtained for the Hillfield Lane site, the construction of the mast will not go ahead there, providing a suitable alternative site can be agreed."
An 02 spokesman told the Mail at the time work on the mast had been "postponed" and that workers were looking for an alternative site once more.
The spokesman said: "Unfortunately there was a change of personnel and the sites that were going to be looked at were never progressed."
Burton Mail. by NERMIN OOMER

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Stretton.
OUTRAGE AS PHONE MAST WORK BEGINS
RESIDENTS have spoken of their outrage after work to erect a mobile phone mast started yesterday – despite assurances the project was on hold.
A crowd of angry villagers gathered in Hillfield Lane after contractors began to lay the foundations for a controversial 15–metre telcommunications mast being erected by mobile phone giants O2.
East Staffordshire Borough Council approved a planning application for the mast in January, despite more than 50 objections from residents concerned about the possible health implications.
However, at the time O2 agreed to meet with residents, councillors and officers to discuss the possibility of finding an alternative site.
During the subsequent meeting the firm made more assurances that it would look for an alternative site and notify the council if any work was to begin — notification which was not received ahead of contractors starting to lay the base for the mast yesterday.
Stretton councillor Ron Clarke accused O2 of going back on its promises and vowed to do all he could to put a stop to the mast’s erection.
Council officials have also written to the firm, asking for the work to be halted.
Councillor Clarke said: "I’m just disgusted. It’s an issue that could have been resolved and avoided. Residents can be assured that I am doing everything I can to get this work stopped."
Bisbell Magnetic Products Ltd, which had originally turned down O2’s approach to site the mast at its Hillfield Lane premises, subsequently offered to allow the monopole to be built behind its factory — providing an alternative site preferred by the majority of nearby residents.
However, residents feel this option, which would have required O2 to pay rent to Bisbell, has been dismissed in favour of the original site, which appears to be owned by no–one.
Derek Ford, who lives metres from the proposed site and has been suffering from cancer for 10 years, said: "My body is now more susceptible to any other form of cancer and the phone mast is of great concern to us in view of its proximity. The National Radiological Protection Board recognises levels of radiation emissions should be lower for people with compromised health, thereby admitting the level of radiation is dangerous for someone with my condition."
A spokesman for O2 said today that the work had started because it had changed agents to deal with the erection of the mast, and the old agents had not made the new firm aware of the on–going issues."
Burton Mail. by KIM BRISCOE

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Wolverhampton:
Phone mast plans will be opposed - pledge
Mobile phone companies are being warned they will be fought all the way over the growing number of bids to erect masts close to homes and schools in Wolverhampton.
The council's three political parties are vowing to oppose all plans for masts in residential areas after mobile firms began asking councillors to support applications for aerials as tall as 15 metres.
In recent months, scores of applications have come in from companies eager to erect masts close to schools, old people's homes and even on top of a pub.
Although councillors have vowed to take a hard line with the phone companies, fears over unknown health risks are not actually a legitimate reason to refuse the applications.
Leader of the city's Conservative group Councillor Paddy Bradley said applications for masts across the city were rolling in "thick and fast".
"They haven't got the message yet but we are very definitely against them," she said.
"We are still worried they can do damage to children," adding that the mobile phone firms were wasting "time and effort" putting in applications for residential areas of Wolverhampton.
Labour councillor George Lockett hoped that a decision by planning officers last week to throw out an application for a mast in Whitburn Close in Oxley would act as a "warning" to mobile phone companies, after a petition attracted 200 signatures.
He said never again should companies be allowed to build masts close to schools - such as the one on top of Long Knowle Primary in Wednesfield.
Liberal Democrat Malc-olm Gwinnett added: "The situation at the moment is utterly ridiculous and the sooner the phone companies realise this the better."
Councillors are also highly critical of the tactics employed by T-Mobile, after private canvassing companies wrote to them on the telecommunication giant's behalf asking them to back its bids to erect phone masts. It is also believed Vodafone has used similar methods.
In just two of the city's 20 wards, Oxley and Wednesfield North, around eight masts have been proposed in this way in recent months.
Oxley Councillor Ian Brookfield said: "It looks like what they are doing is trying to win over the councillor instantly but the minute they start talking about residential areas, they need to know we are on the side of the residents."
Councillor Keith Inston, chairman of the city council's planning committee, said residents' fears were always considered when making decisions on applications.
He said the council would be "a bit more open to suggestion" when it came to applications for masts in industrial areas.
A T-Mobile spokesman defended the decision to contact councillors with proposals, saying they gave people "a better idea as to the visual appearance of the proposed development".
Wolverhampton Chronicle. Jun 16, 2005,

Suffolk:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Haverhil:
MP continues battle against phone mast plan
Inspectorate refuses to accept petition
The campaign against a mobile phone mast on Haverhill's Hazel Stub roundabout continued this week, with residents urging members of the local community to oppose the plans.
As previously reported, Hutchison 3G is appealing against a decision by St Edmundsbury Borough Council to refuse permission for a telecommunications mast on the roundabout.
Residents collected a petition of 400 signatures opposing the mast, amid concerns about health and tumbling house prices, but were stunned to find out the Planning Inspectorate – which is handling the appeal – would not accept the petition.
On Monday evening they began canvassing homes in Castle Reach area, to gather signatures on letters to be sent to the appeal.
Borough councillor, Adam Whittaker, said they had a good response and people were eager to support the cause.
On whether they would succeed in fighting the appeal, he said: "I think the decision of the planning committee was made on the right basis, we argued on the environmental basis and we're hoping the appeals committee will do the same."
He added: "Everyone's got a mobile phonei but they just wish the masts were on more suitable sites."
Meanwhile protestors say they are angry to have so far received no response from Hutchison 3G to their request to work with the company to find a more suitable location.
West Suffolk MP, Richard Spring – who has vociferously campaigned against phone masts in the town – has added his support to the campaign, writing personally to the Planning Inspectorate.
Haverhill Today. 16 June 2005

Surrey:
United Kingdom Created: 10 Jul 2005
Orange challenged to private meeting by angry residents

LOCAL residents have blasted mobile telephone operator Orange for its lack of public consultation over the proposed sitings of masts in Farnham.
Proposed mast sitings by Orange near Bourne Infant School, Waverley Lane and in Manor Gardens have angered residents who have ferociously
campaigned against them. After attempting to liaise with Orange over many months, the Manor Gardens’ Action Group has appealed to officials from the
mobile telephone operator to make public their plans for mast sitings in Farnham. In a letter to Orange, co-ordinators Ray Cuckow and Simon Hall said:
“We know that some people, and indeed some organisations, appear to be against all phone masts. That is not our position and we have stated so publicly.
“We believe that masts must be sited safely, and be sited in a sensitive way environmentally - your Manor Gardens mast proposal meets neither criteria.
On June 5, we offered in writing to meet Orange locally in a small private meeting to find a mutually acceptable way forward. That offer was totally ignored
and not even acknowledged. “We understand that you are handling the Manor Gardens mast nationally so we therefore invite you to join our group for that
small private meeting.” In a survey conducted by the Manor Garden Action Group, 96 per cent of local residents said that they preferred a single mast on
higher ground rather than multiple masts sited among houses and schools. Local residents also criticised Orange for their planning consultation procedures
with 91 per cent saying it has been disastrous for the mobile telephone operator. Finally, 89 per cent of residents said that they would actively avoid using Orange’s technology in comparison to their competitors after the continuing mast sitings fiasco in Farnham.
Farnham Today
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Objections to phone mast plans

A proposal to site a 12m Orange mobile phone mast at the junction of Chessington Road and Longmead Road, Ewell has attracted objections from residents concerned for their health.
In a consultation letter, the telecommunications company told homeowners that the location had been sensitively selected to minimise impact on the
environment.
Thirteen other sites were rejected after preliminary investigations.
But villagers are concerned about the proposed site being near three schools research has linked the masts to childhood leukaemia.
They also claim the consultation has been too narrow.
Orange, which says there is no substantiated evidence about the health threats, is yet to a lodge a formal planning application.
Surrey Comet. Thursday 21st July 2005
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South West Surrey:
Councillor joins Bourne mast protest
SURREY county councillor David Munro has joined the fight to stop mobile telephone operator Orange erecting masts in Farnham. Mr Munro, the county councillor for south Farnham, has written to Orange stating his concerns about the possible erection of masts at the Bourne crossroads and at a site in Manor Gardens on the A287. He has pledged his support for residents’ groups campaigning against Orange and for Jeremy Hunt, MP for south west Surrey, who has urged Orange to reconsider the possible siting of a mast near The Bourne Infant School. Mr Munro said: “These proposals are appalling and must be resisted both on environmental and perceived health grounds. There is no justification for putting these masts in such a prominent position where they will blight the landscape and make many people, especially those with young children, genuinely fearful of the hazards to health. “Orange must not prolong the deep worries that they are putting residents through and must withdraw the proposals straightway. I have written to the company urging them to listen to the protests of residents and our MP, Jeremy Hunt, and think again without delay,” he added. Niki Hearnshaw, campaign co-ordinator for the Bourne school mast action group, is anxious about the length of time Orange are taking to decide about the fate of the proposed mast at The Bourne Infant School. “We were given a promise by Orange in a meeting on May 31 that a decision would be made in two weeks. Since then I have been made aware of a public statement by Orange saying that it may take six to eight weeks,” she said. Residents campaigning against the possible erection of a 40-ft mast at the Manor Gardens site have fiercely criticised Orange. In a survey by the Manor Gardens mast action campaign group, the vast majority of local residents believe that this issue is “a public relations disaster for Orange that does them no credit”, while most residents “would actively avoid Orange and urge all their friends to do the same”. Joint campaign co-ordinator Ray Cuckow, said: “We publicly call on Orange to drop the environmentally damaging Manor Gardens proposal. This mast fails to meet Orange’s published standards of corporate and social responsibility. It would be a very serious loss of amenity, not just for us but also for the whole community.” Orange has responded to the concerns by stating that the decision-making process about the siting of masts is still ongoing and every effort was being made to resolve this as quickly as possible.

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Councillor joins Bourne mast protest
SURREY county councillor David Munro has joined the fight to stop mobile telephone operator Orange erecting masts in Farnham.
Mr Munro, the county councillor for south Farnham, has written to Orange stating his concerns about the possible erection of masts at the Bourne crossroads and at a site in Manor Gardens on the A287.
He has pledged his support for residents’ groups campaigning against Orange and for Jeremy Hunt, MP for south west Surrey,
who has urged Orange to reconsider the possible siting of a mast near The Bourne Infant School.
Mr Munro said: “These proposals are appalling and must be resisted both on environmental and perceived health grounds.
There is no justification for putting these masts in such a prominent position where they will blight the landscape and make many people,
especially those with young children, genuinely fearful of the hazards to health.
“Orange must not prolong the deep worries that they are putting residents through and must withdraw the proposals straightway.
I have written to the company urging them to listen to the protests of residents and our MP, Jeremy Hunt, and think again without delay,” he added.
Niki Hearnshaw, campaign co-ordinator for the Bourne school mast action group, is anxious about the length of time Orange are taking to decide about the fate of the proposed mast at The Bourne Infant School.
“We were given a promise by Orange in a meeting on May 31 that a decision would be made in two weeks.
Since then I have been made aware of a public statement by Orange saying that it may take six to eight weeks,” she said.
Residents campaigning against the possible erection of a 40-ft mast at the Manor Gardens site have fiercely criticised Orange.
In a survey by the Manor Gardens mast action campaign group, the vast majority of local residents believe that this issue is
“a public relations disaster for Orange that does them no credit”, while most residents “would actively avoid Orange and urge all
their friends to do the same”.
Joint campaign co-ordinator Ray Cuckow, said: “We publicly call on Orange to drop the environmentally damaging Manor Gardens proposal.
This mast fails to meet Orange’s published standards of corporate and social responsibility.
It would be a very serious loss of amenity, not just for us but also for the whole community.
” Orange has responded to the concerns by stating that the decision-making process about the siting of masts is still ongoing
and every effort was being made to resolve this as quickly as possible.
Farnham Today 17.06.05

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Hunt calls on Orange to drop mast plan

JEREMY Hunt is calling on telephone company Orange to withdraw its proposals for a mast near Bourne Infant School.
The MP for South West Surrey met with officials from Orange at the House of Commons on Tuesday to discuss their plans for a mast on
Frensham Road.
“I don’t like any of the masts they are proposing but the one near the school is a particular cause of concern,” said Mr Hunt.
“What we have said to them is we would like them to withdraw their proposal for that particular mast. T
heir response is that they would give it careful consideration.
But they didn’t say they would and that is why I am cautious.
I would like to see the colour of their money,” he said.
Niki Bradshaw, campaign co-ordinator for the Bourne School masts action group, was also in attendance at the meeting.
She said: “I was reasonably happy about the meeting.
We were pushing the point that they have to consult with us in the true sense of consultation as opposed to a public relations whitewash.”
“The one good thing to come out of the meeting is that they have committed to reassess all of the sites and that they are going to take notice
of the sensibilities of the school site,” she added.
A spokesman for Orange denied the accusation that they had failed to consult with the local community about their plans for the mast.
“It has been mentioned by various campaign groups that Orange has failed to consult with the Bourne School over its plans to erect a mast on the Frensham Road.
“I can confirm that should Orange decide to proceed with this proposal we have every intention of consulting fully with the school.
“The reason this was not done initially is because these proposals were simply outline plans and no formal plans have been submitted.
“The drop in session was a pre-consultation exercise and was designed for us to get some feedback before we began full consultation.”

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Another MP backing the people

Phone mast health worries after plans go unchallenged
A 73-year-old Cheam man may sell the house he has lived in all his life after plans to build a mobile phone mast within yards of the property were
approved without hearing residents' views.
John Foster, of Fieldsend Road, is among dozens of locals outraged that a plan submitted by T-Mobile to build a 14ft mast close to the junction of
St Dunstan's Hill and Lumley Road has been given the go ahead.
Residents said their concerns about the health risks and the devaluation of property have not been heard despite the fact a petition containing 87
signatures was sent to Sutton Council outlining their objections.
Mr Foster said: "Instead of the council working for us, they appear to be working against us they are going to just stick the mast up regardless.
"I have had the house valued and I am actually considering moving out my wife and I feel this is the last straw."
Fellow Fieldsend Road residents, Karen Grant-Bond, 31, and husband Lloyd Bond, 34, were appalled when they learnt a phone mast would be erected
next to the house they only bought last August.
Among the concerns Mrs Grant-Bond said were overlooked by planners was the suggestion the antenna would be better sited on the other side of the
road where there are much fewer houses.
Mrs Grant-Bond said: "We are not going to stop just because it has been granted We are going to take this to a judicial review."
The residents of Fieldsend Road have been joined in their campaign to get the mast plans scrapped by MP for Sutton and Cheam, Paul Burstow.
Mr Burstow has backed a bill which would see planning guidelines for mobile phone masts overhauled in favour of tighter regulations.
As the law stands, masts under 15 metres can be installed without the need for full planning permission.
"It cannot be right that residents are subject to more stringent planning controls over their own porches and conservatories than mobile phone companies
are over masts that affect the whole area," Mr Burstow said.
A council spokesman said there would be an opportunity for residents to present their petition at the Cheam and Worcester Park area committee on Wednesday, July 20.
By Richard Lyons Surrey Comet Thursday 14th July 2005
********************************************'

MP criticises Blair - more MPs should stand up for us

MP to meet Orange over mast proposals
JEREMY Hunt has criticised Tony Blair and is calling on the Prime Minister to stop ignoring the concerns of local communities about the siting
of mobile phone masts.
The newly elected MP for South West Surrey is meeting representatives from mobile operator Orange to discuss 13 new mast planning applications around the south Bourne area.
“We all want to be able to use a mobile phone, but this doesn’t mean masts should be constructed without any regard for the well- being of local people in south-west Surrey,” he said.
“It is time for Mr Blair to start listening and stop ignoring the views of local communities.
As your member of parliament I will be calling on Mr Blair’s government to address the feelings of powerlessness and frustration experienced
by those living under the threat of badly sited masts,” he added.
One of the sites Mr Hunt will be discussing at the meeting concerns the proposed site on Waverley Lane, opposite
Bourne Infant School. Niki Hearnshaw, campaign co-ordinator for the Bourne School Masts Action Group, said:
“It is great news that this meeting is taking place and that Mr Hunt is helping us with our campaign against the siting of this mast.
” Ms Hearnshaw has been invited to attend the meeting to discuss her concerns about the mast.
“I am delighted to get the opportunity speak with Orange face to face.
I want them to know that there is no way we will give up our fight
no matter how long it takes,” she said.
“The fundamental problem is that Orange has failed to fulfil their promise to consult with the school and the local community
about the siting of the mast.”
All Ms Hearnshaw’s children have attended the school and she is worried out the health effects of the mast on the children.
“The mast will be about 50 metres from the school and because the school is on a hill the mast’s beam will be in line with the playground.
We have had this independently verified by local radiologists,” she said.
And in a further boost for protesters, BBC television cameras visited Bourne Infant School on Wednesday to publicise its fight against
the possible siting of a mast nearby the school.
A statement from Orange said: “We are currently reconsidering a number of proposals as a direct result of the consultation undertaken
at The Bush Hotel back in April.
“We understand the strength of feeling among the local community and although we have a few options left available to us,
we have agreed to revisit some of the previously discounted alternative sites.
We hope to have made some final decisions about which sites we will be progressing within the next two months.
The footage taken at Bourne Infant School will be broadcast on BBC’s South Today during the news coverage of the meeting
between Jeremy Hunt, Niki Hearnshaw and representatives from Orange at the House of Commons on Tuesday, May 31.
Farnham Today 03/06/05

Sussex:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
Sussex Let's put an end to mast hysteria

A COUNCILLOR wants taxpayers money to be spent telling a sceptical public mobile phone masts are safe.
Labour Councillor Roy Pennington, who has outed himself as one of a small band of mast sympathisers on Brighton and Hove City Council, accused his colleagues of "low-level hypocrisy" for peddling hysteria about the unproven dangers of mobile phone masts to win votes. ...
..Coun Pennington said "We should look at why people have these concerns. Scientists have said there is no significant risk but people still feel there is
and we should do something to allay fears"
"There is too much hysteria about mobile phone masts"
"Mobile phone masts are as safe as safe can be".
letters@theargus.co.uk
*************************************'
Protesters force mobile firm to think again

Protesters campaigning against a mobile phone mast have forced a company to look for another site.
Seventy people opposed to 02's plans to construct a 15m mast outside the Norwich Union building, Worthing, stormed the company's drop-in session,
designed to explain the plans to the public.
It withdrew its application to erect the mast just north of the Broadwater roundabout from Worthing Borough Council two weeks ago for further public consultation but has now gone back to the drawing board.
The protest at Broadwater Parish Rooms on Tuesday evening was organised by the Charmandean, Offington and Broadwater Residents' Association,
which was set up in response to the plans.
Residents are worried about the mast being built within close proximity of homes, fears over health and environmental issues and the impact on property
prices.
02 community relations manager James Stevenson said: "Given the level of protest we have to take it seriously and we are going to look in the area again
for an alternative site which we can take to the local planners."
He explained a base station was necessary to provide 02 customers with third generation (3G) services and it was impossible to erect it alongside the
Orange mast further in Worthing because there was not enough room.
Campaigner Erwin Sargent, 51, said: "We put a lot of effort into organising the protest and it went very well, showing up the plan's inadequacies and the
level of concern in the community."
The Argus, West Sussex
***************************''''''
Pagham

Mobile phone giant O2 wants to put up a new mast in across the road from a popular playgroup meeting place.
The firm has issued notification that it intends to install the structure, believed to be 15 metres high, a similar distance across Nyetimber Lane
from the Pagham Church Centre.
This is used five mornings and two afternoons a week by 65 children in Pagham Playgroup.
It also hosts sessions of the Brownies, Guides, Rainbows as well as a mother and toddler group.
Two masts are already sited nearby on the football club and cricket club grounds.
Full report in the June 16 edition of the Bognor Regis Observer. 16 June 2005

************************************************
Nutley.
RELIEF AS MAST PLAN SCRAPPED

The Owner of a small goat dairy farm in Nutley has spoken of his relief after plans to build a mobile phone mast metres from his kidding shed were withdrawn.
Brian Willcock, 74, of Humphreys Farm, said he would have been forced to get rid of his goats if plans to site the mast got approval.
But weeks after submitting plans for the site off the A22, telecommunications giants Vodafone and Orange have unexpectedly withdrawn their application.
Steve Arnold of Crown Castle UK said: "Orange and Vodafone are now not wanting to proceed with the project on that site So we will be withdrawing the application."
A Vodaphone spokeswoman said: "We withdrew [the plan] because of a financial reprioritisation It may not be a permanent withdrawl, it may be transferred to a future financial year."
Mr Willcock said: "I'm very relieved indeed, and most grateful to Crown Castle for withdrawing their application. I think it is a morally correct decision."
The former pilot - who looks after the farm with his wife Margaret - was convinced that emissions from the proposed structure would have proven harmful to his herd and said that research into the effects of electromagnetic waves on animals confirmed his fears.
His concerns followed an application to Wealden District Council earlier this month by telecommunication sites manager Crown Castle UK for a new lattice mast to be built at the Nutley Telephone Exchange.
The proposed structure would have stood at 17.5m with a 3.2m slimline rocket extension to support Vodafone and Orange antennae.
If given approval, it would have been only 8m from a kidding shed at the farm and 21m from a milking parlour.
Mr Willcock said he feared the effect that the mast would have had on his goats and pointed towards a recent study in which cattle exposed to electromagnetic fields experienced lower milk yields and increased occurrence of poor health and behavioural abnormalities.
The German experts behind the investigation found that when removed from a nearby transmitting antenna the cows recovered, only for symptoms to reoccur when they were returned to the original field.
Mr Willcock - a mobile phone user himself - has now called on network operators to position masts away from people and livestock.
He said: "We don't mind masts, but what we do not want is masts that are close to houses.
"All we are asking is for the masts to be 400m away."
Over the last eight years, repeated bids to station a mast on land next to his farm have been made. During one previous application, Mr Willcock collected 600 names on a petition objecting to the mast.
Kent and Sussex Courier. - 27 May 2005

*****************************************************''
Bognor Regis:
The people v 02

This is one of three local campaigns against 02.
The other two areas, Avisford Park, and West Park, have joined together to fight 02 on three fronts.
Other areas of Bognor Regis are helping, too.
Pagham and West Park proposed sites are only 1 mile away on opposite sides from Avisford Park.
West Park has been blitzed for the past eighteen months.
The petition total has now passed the 500 mark with many more to come in.
Viva the people and people power!
Sandi

********************************************************
Shoreham
People Power again

A group formed to fight plans to put a mobile phone mast outside homes in north Shoreham won the first round of its battle on Monday.
Shoreham Community Residents Against Masts (SCRAM) was set up by leading protester Rod Hotton, whose home in Downsway would have directly
faced the mast.
Mr Hotton, now chairman of SCRAM, held a protest meeting in his garden, got residents to sign protest letters and lobbied the council in a bid to get its
support.
Although T-Mobile did not technically need planning permission for its proposed, 11-metre mast on the junction of Downsway and Upper Shoreham Road, because it was under 15 metres high, Adur councillors unanimously voted to refuse it after stating it was detrimental to the area and would endanger
traffic on a busy road junction.
Member Janet Mockridge said: "This is a totally inappropriate site for a phone mast. It will spoil a green, leafy environment and would stand in isolation in the area."
Mr Hotton, speaking from a packed public gallery, spoke on behalf of the objectors, after Adur council revealed it had received 328 letters of objection from residents against the mast.

Mr Hotton urged the council to use its best endeavours to get the law and planning guidelines changed, as he claimed the current rules and regulations
were biased in favour of the telecommunications companies.
After the meeting, Mr Hotton said: "Although the first battle has been won, SCRAM are expecting an appeal by T-Mobile, despite suggesting several
feasible alternative sites.
"SCRAM are already preparing their case for the next stage and are also prepared to take the fight all the way to the European courts, if necessary."
Shoreham Herald, Sussex 07 July 2005

*********************''
Shoreham
Planners back mast refusal

A protest against a mobile phone mast is expected to go ahead despite a council recommendation the planning application should be refused.
Adur District Council has received 264 letters objecting to telecoms firm T-Mobile's plans for a 12m mast at the junction of Downsway and Upper Shoreham Road, Shoreham.
Objectors include Shoreham Community Residents Against Masts and the Campaign for Planning Sanity. They fear the mast will have a major impact on the appearance of the area and could pose a health risk.
There are also concerns it could block the view of motorists using the busy junction and harm wildlife including bats, pigmy shrews and stag beetles.
West Sussex County Council's transport officers say refusal would be justified on road safety grounds. They believe a mast so close to the junction could affect safety when maintenance vehicles are parked nearby.
Adur planning officers are also recommending refusal because it would be too close to the junction and homes.
Protestors say they will go ahead with a demonstration ahead of Monday's planning meeting at the civic centre in Ham Road, Shoreham, at 7pm.
Organiser Rod Hotton said: "We are going to demonstrate to reinforce our objections to the application and spur councillors into refusing it."
The Argus, West Sussex
************************************
Edenbridge
APPROVAL IS GIVEN FOR MAST

3G will not have major impact? Town Council needseducating!
Councillors have given the green light for an application for a mobile phone mast in Edenbridge.
At a meeting of Edenbridge Town Council's planning and transportation committee on Monday they agreed that the 17.5m high mast, three antennas
and a dish antenna should be allowed to be installed in Fircroft Way.
The council representatives decided that as the area was already industrial the mast would not have a major impact on the surrounding area.
Cllr Elizabeth Plant did have some concerns about the height of the proposed mast but others agreed that the application should be accepted.
The application by Hutchinson 3G will now go to Sevenoaks District Council where a final decision is expected to be taken by the end of July.
Kent and Sussex Courier 01 July 2005

Warwickshire:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
Stratford- Upon- Avon
MAYOR BOOED AT CEMETERY MAST MEETING

STRATFORD’S mayor was publicly booed by residents in an emotionally charged meeting over plans for a mobile phone mast on the roof of Stratford
Cemetery chapel.
The residents became increasingly angry and frustrated as they were made to wait two hours for their issue to be discussed at a meeting of the town
council on Tuesday night.
Some 60 residents from the Evesham Road and the King’s Acre area turned up at the meeting at which Cllr Keith Lloyd was to ask the council to revoke its decision to allow the mast to be erected.
Stratford- Upon- Avon Herald 21.07.05
********************************************************
'We're on red alert over phone mast resurrection'

Residents near a giant phone mast toppled by protesters said they were on 'red alert' last night to stop any new erection of the structure.
The 60ft mast was put up a month ago in Walsall Road, Stone Cross, West Bromwich, by telecommunications giant O2.
The first self-employed transport company worker, Ric Keeling, knew of the plan was when the towering structure appeared overnight - 20ft from
his home.
He said: "I was horrified.
"It went up at 7am without a word to a single person saying it was coming.
" I had never heard about mast protests until it appeared.
"But I've got a two year old daughter and from what I've heard, we just don't know enough about the effect of these things on people's health."
Last Friday, residents woke up to find the controversial mast had been felled in the night.
"Everyone was elated that it had happened," said Mr Keeling, who collected 100 signatures from neighbours for a petition against the mast.
"We just wanted to say 'well done' to whoever did it. We have heard O2 want to re-erect the mast as soon as possible and they will come with a police
convoy. "We are all on red alert."
A spokeswoman for O2 said the mast was temporary and erected under emergency powers they had to circumvent planning permission or public consultation.
Yesterday, old mast fittings were removed by 02 engineers in preparation for its re- erection - expected to take place early next week.
"We want the mast back up as soon as possible," said the spokeswoman. "We are, in fact, currently looking for a permanent site in the immediate area and
once an agent identifies one there will be consultation with residents.
"I want to stress there is no evidence of any risk to health at all.
"Cutting it down was a very irresponsible action by a small group that has left people without mobile phone coverage."
Jul 26 2005 Birmingham Post

***********************************************'
Warwick: Community backs fight against phone mast giant

West Warwick residents stepped up their protests to get a planning application refused this week.
Dolores Macias, of Goldsmith Avenue, has already voiced her concerns over the proposal to put up a mobile phone mast in Hampton Road,
as reported in the Courier earlier this month.
And even though the community got behind her this week, Ms Macias fears her efforts will be in vain.
She said: "It's great that people have spoken out and one of the councillors for the area was enthusiastic in trying to help.
"I have sent six letters to the district council, and I know a lot of other people have written, so at least the application has to go to a committee decision now.
"That was the main aim.
"The Racing Club and the cricket club are against the plans as well because it is going to be built opposite their playing fields.
"But let's be honest, they are still going to put it up aren't they?
"This is a multi-million pound company we are talking about and there's only so much ordinary people can do.
"It is like banging your head against a brick wall.
"These masts are poisonous and no one will do anything about it.
"If we can defer the decision long enough for me to get my house decorated and sold I will see it as a success.
"I am emigrating to Spain, this country has gone to pot."
A planning committee will discuss the application at a meeting on August 3rd.
Warwickshire County Councillor Raj Randev (Lab, Warwick West) said: "The community has my support.
"I should have been consulted on this but had no idea about it until I read the Courier's report.
"I feel there are a lot of things going on in the background that people in my ward do not know enough about.
"That road is used by children going to Aylesford and Newburgh School and is also next to playing fields which are used regularly.
"Until we know the full facts I will support refusal on health grounds."
The application comes from British Telecom mobile phone operator 02 and carries permitted development rights.
Spokesman James Stevenson claimed that independent research, carried out on behalf of 02, returned no evidence to suggest any health risks will
be posed by the mast.
He also said a full public consultation will be carried out.
Warwick Courier. 26 July 2005
**************************************'''
MASTS ATTACK - NO DEFENCE!

Planners feel powerless and 'utterly disabled' in the battle against the installation of additional and more powerful mobile phone masts in Coleshill.
At a meeting on Monday (August 15), North Warwickshire Borough Councillors Peter Fowler and Gordon Sherratt, both residents of Coleshill, tried to
object to the addition of six powerful antennae on a mast close to High Meadow Infant School.
But their objections proved to be in vain after they were told health concerns are no grounds on which to turn down a mast planning proposal.
Cllr Sherratt, who says Coleshill now operates at a greater density of masts per person than Birmingham, has even issued a challenge for anyone
in the town who suffers a poor mobile signal to let him know.
"They keep telling us we need more and more masts for local people, but we've got 22 of the things already and I've never yet heard a single person
complain about reception."
Cllr Fowler added: "We virtually have two hands tied behind our backs so the mobile companies can just go ahead and do this.
"The network providers have told me that since the BSE scandal no scientist will put his head above the parapet and risk being wrong about a health issue.
"So they've got no-one making a serious effort to prove masts are damaging. Which is no good for us who need to know one way or the other".
"And yet again it's children who are potentially affected," he added.
Lindsey Smith, News Reporter

*******************************'
Phone giant ‘will not replace mast’

Telecommunications titan T-Mobile has given a written guarantee that it will not replace an illegally-felled mobile phone mast in Wishaw.
Sutton MP Andrew Mitchell secured the promise.
Wishaw has been the most controversial mast hotspot locally, with an antenna in the area leading to the formation of SCRAM – Seriously Concerned
Residents Against Masts – a protest group borne out of allegations that communications equipment was responsible for a cluster of nearby cancer cases.
The mast was eventually brought down overnight by unidentified vandals.
Mr Mitchell first contacted T-Mobile in March this year following residents’ concerns that the operator was going to site a new mast in the contentious area,
with Bulls Lane named as the spot.
Some residents had planned to pay for private security to keep out expected engineers.
“This is great news,” said Mr Mitchell, my constituents were particularly concerned about the proposals for the Bulls Lane site and I had been pressing
T-Mobile to take their views and concerns into consideration. “After persistent pressure we have now received a guarantee that T-Mobile has no intention
of progressing any development at the site.”
Local resident and founder of SCRAM Eileen O’Connor added: “I am thrilled at this news.
“This guarantee lifts a real weight of our minds. “We were devastated by the thought of a new mast in Bulls Lane.
“ We do feel that the threat of a new mobile phone mast in our community will always exist until we own the land at Fairview Farm in Bulls Lane
and this is something that we are working towards.”
John Shaughnessy, T-Mobile’s community affairs manager, explained: “T-Mobile as no intention of progressing any development at the site at Bulls Lane.
We have no further interest in that location with regard to network coverage.
“Neither do we have an interest with regard to the land itself.”
For more information about SCRAM go to www.scram.uk.com
Sutton Coldfield Observer news paper 22 July, 2005
By John Newton News Reporter

************************************''''
Coventry: Phone mast protest is up, up and away!

Campaigners fighting plans to put a mobile phone mast near a school released 500 balloons during a mass demonstration.
The balloons were meant to represent the number of children that, protesters claim, could suffer damage to their health.
Residents are angry after the Coventry Howitzer Club, in Albert Street, Hillfields, agreed to let Hutchison 3G put a mast on the roof of the building in
exchange for rent of about £10,000 a year.
It has yet to be put up but will not need planning permission as it is below a specific height.
Pupils from nearby schools joined staff - and animals from Coventry City Farm - and local people, to release the balloons before handing a 1,000-name
petition to club bosses.
The club is 500 yards from St Mary's and St Benedict's Primary School, in Leigh Street, and 100 yards from Hillfields Early Years Centre.
Joseph Parrott, aged 11, of St Mary's, said: "I think masts are bad for health because of radiowaves - we might get cancer."
Campaign coordinator Jenny Gregory, aged 34, of Charles Street, Hillfields, denied she was being hypocritical despite owning a mobile phone herself.
"We have all got mobile phones and we already get good coverage here without another mast," she said.
"Nobody is against mobile phone masts but they should not be put up near schools and nurseries, and residential areas."
She claimed the only scientific research that had been done was into the thermal effects of masts on the human body, and not the biological effects.
Later there was a confrontation at the front door as a
Hutchison representative claimed committee members were too busy to come down and accept the petition in person. Instead a club member entering
the venue agreed to take the paperwork inside.
Former ward councillor Rob Windsor, one of the protesters, said: "Somebody should have had the decency to come down for 30 seconds and accept it.
It's an utter disgrace."
Campaigners claim the club allowed the mast without consulting its membership.
No-one from the club was available for comment.
By Duncan Gibbons Jul 25 2005 Evening Telegraph Coventry 25.07.05
**********************************'
Stone Cross , West Bromwich

It seams we have some bad bad people who have pulled down a temporary mast!
How shocking, how awful, how naughty.
at Stone Cross , West Bromwich overnight.
It could be on the local ATV news tonight.
We are sooooooo upset at w-a-r-t that we have had to have several large G & T's to calm us down.
Peter and Ann. W-A-R-T
Wednesbury Action for the Removal of Telephone masts.
http://www.w-a-r-t.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
**********************************'
Coleshill:
FURY AS A NEW MAST IS UNCOVERED

A Mobile phone mast hidden inside a petrol station price sign has caused fury among residents in Coleshill.
The mast, owned by telecommunications giant T-Mobile, is believed to have been placed within the price sign at the Shell garage
after residents overturned plans to erect it at the BT telephone exchange in the town centre in 2001.
Now residents plan to stage a public protest at the High Street service station on Saturday (July 23), amid demands that mobile phone
companies become 'more transparent'.
More than 300 residents have written to mast owner T-Mobile and to Shell UK following the mast's discovery, which came to light when residents
concerned about the growing number of masts in Coleshill looked up the locations of all the local masts on a government telecommunications website.
Diane Upton, who lives just off the High Street in Wood Close, says she's appalled with the mobile phone company.
"Considering operators are always telling us masts are completely safe it seems a little odd to have to resort to hiding one in a petrol station sign,"
she told the Herald.
"We've had a letter from T-Mobile saying that the mast is harmless but I don't believe it.
I've got rashes and my husband's just been diagnosed with throat cancer."
Coleshill Cllr Gordon Sherratt was on the parish council which objected to the height of the mast four years ago.
"I remember they tried to get a mast put up at the BT exchange and people objected, so they pulled out.
"Then the garage applied for planning permission for a new sign.
We thought it was too tall and tried to object on those grounds but there was definitely nothing about there being a mast inside it."
Tamworth Herald. LINDSEY SMITH. 21 July 2005
****************************************'
Coleshill:
Another demonstation today at Coleshill

Maybe sheer British bulldog persistence pays off?
Third protest against mobile mast
Pupils in Warwickshire are to hold another demonstration against a mobile phone mast which has been erected next to their school.
Children from St Edward's Primary School in Coleshill are to refuse to go to lessons for the third consecutive Friday.
Their parents are claiming that emissions from the mast are making the children ill.
O2 which owns the mast said it is meeting government safety guidelines.
BBC News Website 15.07.05
***************************************'
Coleshill:
Coleshill mast may be moved

Mobile phone giant O2 says it is looking for an alternative location for the mast at the centre of an alleged health scare in Coleshill.
Concerns over possible negative effects the 11-year-old mast is having on the health of children at St Edward's RC Primary School in
Packington Lane prompted urgent talks between O2 and the local education and planning authorities last week.
But parents, who have been withdrawing their children from the school on Fridays in protest against the mast, say they will keep up the pressure
by maintaining their presence at the school gates until the mast is removed.
The organisations plan to meet again later this month, at which point a report from the Health Protection Agency - which was called in to
investigate a health survey carried out at the school - will be available.
The search for land on which to re-site the mast has been welcomed by the county council and by officials from St Edward's and the Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham, who all want the mast removed.
In a further report chartered physicist Dr John C Walker alleges that a 'cancer cluster' affecting some houses has been discovered close to
the town centre.
His report will also be presented to Government adviser Sir William Stewart who chaired the independent panel investigation into the possible
effects of mobile phone masts in 2000.
Speaking about Dr Walker's report, Angela Johnson, community relations manager for O2, said: "There is no evidence that mobile phone masts,
including the masts in Coleshill, cause illness.
"And there is no research to show any difference in the number of cancer sufferers in areas with mobile phone masts and those without.
"Although the figures in Dr Walker's report seem high, we need to wait until the Health Protection Agency have come up with their results before commenting further."
LINDSEY SMITH Tamworth Herald 14.07.05
***********************’’
Coleshill:
AGENCY CALLED IN TO LOOK AT PHONE MAST HEALTH EFFECTS

The Health Protection Agency has been called in to analyse the results of a survey which appears to show that a high number of Coleshill
residents and schoolchildren are suffering with health problems.
Warwickshire County Council has asked the independent agency - set up to provide protection against health dangers including radiation -
to investigate residents' fears about phone masts.
The news comes after dozens of parents temporarily withdrew their children from St Edward's Catholic Primary School and Warwickshire County Council called for a mast next to the school to be removed.
County council officials say the health of the children at the school is 'a prime concern' and, although emissions tests conducted on behalf of mast owners O2 showed levels 995 times below the permitted maximum, the authority opposes the mast 'on a matter of principle'.
Eric Wood, county education officer, said: "We will support anything that we can do to remove it, and would urge O2 to relocate the mast for
the peace of mind of the local community."
Gill Owen, headteacher of St Edward's, said: "Like the parents I am uneasy about the presence of the mast, and I am happy for them to
campaign against it. But I would ask that they continue to conduct matters through the appropriate channels, and ensure that their children's education continues unaffected while this matter is being resolved."
However, parents say they plan to protest again from 9am on Friday and every Friday until the matter is resolved.
Tamworth Herald. - 30 June 2005
*************************************'
Coleshill.
Group to intervene over mast row

The body which runs Roman Catholic schools in the region has intervened in the row over a mobile phone mast near a Warwickshire primary school.
The Diocesan Schools Commission is to ask phone company 02 to move the mast away from St Edwards RC school in Coleshill.
Parents of pupils at the school say the mast is responsible for complaints such as headaches and nosebleeds.
O2 has denied that its mast is responsible for the complaints.
Around 40 children at the school left class on Friday morning to join a protest against the siting of the mast.
The Diocesan Schools Commission, which owns St Edwards, said it understands the concerns but says it is not qualified to comment on the alleged effects of the mast transmissions.
It has agreed to ask O2 to relocate the mast as a gesture of goodwill.
BBc News website 25.06.05

***********************************
Rednal
Lowhill mast is a high talking point

A TOTAL of 363 South Birmingham residents have signed a petition to protest at the controversial proposal to build a mobile phone mast in Rednal.
And, in addition to the signatures, more than 50 people turned up to a special meeting on Tuesday (June 21) at St Stephen's Church to voice their concerns.
The action relates to an application by T-Mobile to build an 18.7metre mobile phone mast on the corner of Lowhill Lane and Lickey Road which residents
feel be a blot on the landscape.
Joanne Davey, a member of the group, said: "There has been an awful lot of concern from residents who think it will spoil the appearance of the local area.
"There are schools, nurseries and around 400 houses in the surrounding area and everyone will be forced to look at it on a daily basis.
"And we are also concerned that it will become another area for kids to hang out in and graffitti."
MP Richard Burden was unable to make the meeting due to parliamentary business in London, but sent a representative on his behalf.
"I am also pleased that local councillors were there - it is very important that the council takes into consideration what residents have to say on matters
such as these, and listen to their views,” he added.
The deadline for letters against the proposal was June 22, but this has now been extended to Wednesday (June 29).
A T-Mobile spokesperson said it recognised that one of its biggest challenges was minimising the impact on the environment.
"When a new mast is needed, we try to reduce the impact on the local environment with sensitive siting, innovative design, and where appropriate
landscaping.
"We are always conscious of local wildlife and conversation," he added.
A Birmingham City Council spokesperson said the application was being considered and if it was going to committee it would probably be on July 7.
Bromsgrove Standard 23 June 05

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Wolverhampton
Unused mast still at school

An inactive phone mast is still in place on top of a school six years after it stopped working as no-one will take it down.
The mast, on Long Knowle Primary School in Wednesfield, was built in 1997 but has not been used since Ionica Telecommunications, who put the mast up,
went bust in 1999.
However since the company are no longer active no-one will pay the cost, believed to run into thousands of pounds, to take the mast down.
Headmaster Martyn Bidgood said: "I have had a number of parents who have come to me worried about the mast but that mast has not been used since 1999.
"Last Friday I sent a reassuring letter to all parents explaining that the mast was no longer in use and most parents seem to be happy with that."
Mr Bidgood said the parents who contacted him had younger children at the school whereas most of the older children's parents knew it was no longer in use.
School caretaker Les Sharratt said he believed British Telecom had looked at the mast two years ago but decided they did not want to take it over.
"There's so much stuff up there that it would cost, four, five thousands pounds or maybe even more to take it all down.
"We're a small school so we just can't afford to do that."
Mr Bidgood added most parents and teachers were used to the mast by now.
"It is almost as if it has become accepted. Now whether that's right or not I don't know," he said.
"It would be nice if it could be removed. If you actually take the time to look at it, it is a bit of an eyesore but I guess everyone has just got used to it."
A spokesman for Wolverhampton City Council said: "Wolverhampton LEA and the school currently have no concerns about the telecommunications mast, 'which is deactivated.
"The authority and the school will work together on a scheme of work to remove the equipment when they feel the time is appropriate."
Jun 23, 2005,
Wolverhampton Chronicle

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Birmingham

A Sutton woman who plans to run the New York Marathon in November is making great strides in her fundraising efforts.

A 12-metre high mobile phone mast is proposed for land adjacent to Sainsbury's supermarket in Mere Green.
Sheryl Paintain, from Walmley, has pledged to raise £2,000 for Breast Cancer Care, and already pupils from Banners Gate Infant School have
contributed £170.
Birches Green School in Erdington has also raised the stakes by collecting £250.
Twenty-three-year-old Sheryl is now looking for more sponsors to help her reach her target.
Anyone willing to donate money should contact Sheryl on 07843 243 707.
The T Mobile mast and equipment will be positioned on Mere Green Road, if permission is granted.
Public objections are welcome.
Call 0121 3031115 or email planning.enquiries@birming- ham.gov.uk.
Quote planning reference number N/04493/05/NOT.
10:30 - 22 July 2005
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Birmingham.
Phone masts ban set to be lifted
Jun 27 2005
By Neil Elkes, Evening Mail
A BAN stopping mobile phone masts being put on council offices and tower blocks is expected to be lifted following the publication of a report today.
Birmingham City Council issued a temporary ban in February 2004 because of fears that masts could cause a range of illnesses from sickness and nausea to cancer.
But following a six month inquiry into the ban, a panel of councillors concluded that masts should be allowed on city owned property.
They believe that by designating certain sites, away from homes and schools, and dictating strict terms on leases they can better control the spread of masts throughout the city.
However, Birmingham's leading anti-mast campaigner Eileen O'Connor described lifting the ban as "foolish".
She said: "I attended most of the inquiry sessions and the evidence that masts are dangerous is overwhelming.
"I would not like to be responsible as a landlord for inflicting masts on the population of Birmingham. It is very foolish."
Eileen, of Wishaw, near Sutton Coldfield, said that the council might also raise rents and leases for the mast sites in a cynical bid to cash in on the explosion in mobile phone use.
But she added that some good might come from the inquiry if restrictions on masts are tightened and their locations are limited as a result.
There are already more than 500 masts in Birmingham, with plans for another 200 in the pipeline as phone companies increase the range of mobile phone services.
The inquiry, chaired by Coun Michael Wilkes (Lib Dem, Hall Green), has heard evidence from the mobile phone companies, the National Radiological Protection Board, independent scientists, anti-mast campaign groups, families and planning officials.
The full city council will vote on the report at its next meeting on July 5.


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BIRMINGHAM
Birmingham council upsets the people with U turn

City scraps phone mast ban despite health fears
A temporary ban on siting mobile phone masts on land and property owned by Birmingham City Council is to be lifted.
Council members decided unanimously to scrap "without delay" a moratorium in return for imposing strict controls on the masts' operators.
It follows a scrutiny committee inquiry which concluded that, if the ban remained in place, the council would be powerless to prevent phone companies
placing masts on roadsides and privately-owned sites.
Mick Wilkes, who chaired the committee, proposed "stringent" controls including independent audits of emissions to ensure radiation safety levels
were not exceeded and regular safety checks.
Coun Wilkes (Lib Dem Hall Green) accepted there were great public fears about possible long term health risks but there was no independent medical
evidence to back the concerns.
The decision, at last night's full council, came as it emerged companies were waiting to take advantage of Birmingham's changed policy.
Coun Len Gregory (Con Billesley), cabinet member for transportation, said: "We have been approached in the past few days by operators who say
that they want to use our real estate, our lamp columns, for mobile phone masts.
"We cannot stick our heads in the sand. If we continue with the moratorium the mobile phone operators can put masts up alongside the highway without reference to us." A number of councillors voiced concerns about health risks.
Coun Deirdre Alden (Con Edgbaston) warned: "If people who smoke for 40 years are prepared to sue tobacco companies when they get cancer,
you can be sure there is someone who will sue the council when they are made ill by a mast next to their house."
By Paul Dale, Chief Reporter Birmingham Post. Jul 6 2005
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School masts legal warning

BIRMINGHAM schools which lease their rooftops for mobile phone masts could face future legal action from sick pupils, it was claimed today.
The city's leading mast activist has slammed the city council for "washing its hands" of the problem by giving school governors the final say on whether masts should be put on their buildings.
Eileen O'Connor, spokeswoman for Seriously Concerned Residents Against Masts, said council chiefs were also throwing temptation at governors who would be allowed to keep at least £5,000-ayear per mast.
Mrs O'Connor said: "This is a cop-out. The councillors are putting themselves in the clear by passing responsibility to the schools.
"When masts are proved unsafe, as I have no doubt they will be, it is the school governors who could face the consequences," she added.
An independent survey of residents found that two-thirds were opposed to masts on or near schools but threequarters said they were an acceptable development to allow the use of phones.
Eileen said: "What we need are limits on all masts." Chairman of a council inquiry into masts, Coun Michael Wilkes, said some schools may prefer to have
masts on their own site rather than scattered on private sites around the school.
He argued that by lifting a ban on masts on council-owned buildings, the city was taking control of the issue.
Coun Wilkes said that if the ban continued an equivalent or possibly greater number of masts would be displaced to private land under less stringent
conditions.
He said: "We will ensure that governors are provided with an impartial package of information so they can make an informed choice."
By Neil Elkes, Evening Mail Jun 29 2005
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Birmingham.
Schools, old people's homes and children's playgrounds across Birmingham could get lucrative financial handouts if they agree to have controversial
mobile phone masts sited on their land.
The idea stems from a city council scrutiny inquiry into telecommunications policy, which is recommending ending a temporary 17-month ban on
placing masts on local authority land or buildings.
In return for agreeing to have a mast, governors would get at least half of the annual rental to boost school funds.
With annual leasing fees topping £10,000, schools could make £50,000 for a ten-year contract.
Council-run old people's homes would be offered a similar deal.
Rental from masts on council housing estates and playgrounds would be used to improve community facilities.
The proposition was condemned last night by a leading anti-mast campaigner.
Eileen O'Connor, from Sutton Coldfield, said schools and residential homes would be tempted to make money without properly considering health risks.
Mrs O'Connor said: "They will be encouraged by the telecommunications industry to take the offer and then foolishly suffer the consequences."
Mrs O'Connor, a cancer sufferer who believes her illness was worsened by radiation from masts, was saddened that the council was likely to end the
ban on siting masts on local authority property.
She said: "I sat through every one of the scrutiny committee hearings and there was no evidence given that masts are safe.
They are likely to accelerate the growth of tumours in people who already have them.
"If the committee hearings had been a court of law, the telecommunications industry would have been found guilty. I just don't know how the council
can lift the ban when there is so much uncertainty about mobile phones and health risks."
The council already has lease agreements with mobile phone companies at 134 sites across the city under contracts approved before the ban
came into force.
Most masts are placed on high-rise flats and offices.
Scrutiny committee chairman Mick Wilkes insisted that Birmingham would not become a "soft touch".
The committee's recommendations stipulate that the ban should only be lifted if mobile phone operators agree to independent checks on the operation of the masts.
Proposals include: * Independent audits of emissions to ensure radiation safety levels are not exceeded *
Regular inspections to make sure masts conform to the original specification supplied *
Development of a standard lease agreement enabling the contracts to be terminated should future research show masts to have adverse health effects.
Coun Wilkes (Lib Dem, Hall Green) said Birmingham was planning the most stringent conditions on the siting of masts anywhere in the country.
Other councils would probably follow suit.
He stressed the council could not ignore the popularity of mobile phones and the requirement of the business community to benefit from easier
communication. Birmingham could not afford to have "black holes" where mobile phones could not work.
At the same time, it was necessary to recognise public concern about health risks.
He added: "We are proposing a very strict regime with tough checks. The conditions we require are the most exacting to be found anywhere."
Coun Wilkes pointed out that, if the ban were to continue, mobile phone companies would take advantage of Government planning guidelines to
site masts on privately-owned land or next to roads. The council would in that case be powerless to prevent the uncontrolled expansion of masts.
"Not only would we have less control, but the distribution of masts and possibly the numbers may be worse," he added.
Birmingham Evening Mail Jun 28 2005
By Paul Dale, Chief Reporter

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City vows to be tough on masts

CITY council chiefs today vowed they would not be a "soft touch" for the mobile phone industry by lifting a ban on masts.
The big five mobile phone companies, Vodafone, O2, 3, T-mobile and Orange are set to be able to put new masts on city offices, schools,
leisure centres and tower blocks from November 1.
The controversial move was exclusively revealed in yesterday's Evening Mail.
But Coun Michael Wilkes (Lib Dem, Hall Green), who chaired the six-month inquiry into masts amid fears they cause ill-health,
insisted that the lifting of the ban would give the city greater control over the sites, locations and output of masts in Birmingham.
He said: "If this policy is endorsed, further masts will only be erected on council land and premises on the council's terms and we will not be a soft touch.
"The conditions we require are the most exacting to be found anywhere.
"I believe that this policy represents good sense and is in the best interests of Birmingham as whole."
They decided that by allowing masts, for example, on a high rise block, it would prevent three or four masts being sited on low level private land or roads
in the same area.
Coun Wilkes added that if the ban continued masts would simply be displaced to unsuitable and less desirable privately-owned sites or roadsides where the council is powerless to control them.
A key consideration was the business community and the thousands of regular mobile phone users.
The Birmingham Chamber of Commerce feared that the city would lose its competitive edge and be seen as a technology "black hole" if the ban continued.
The Full Council will vote on the report on July 5.
By Neil Elkes, Evening Mail Birmingham. Jun 28 2005

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Mast joy soured

FAMILIES' delight at the removal of a mobile phone mast next to a primary school was short lived after another sprung up in its place just hours later.
Campaigners and parents have battled to get the mast on the roof of AAP Consulting of Union Drive, Boldmere, taken down.
They thought they had won the fight when planning chiefs ordered its removal.
But after pulling down the offending mast, AAP director Stephen Alexander simply put another up and started the whole application process again.
And there was nothing the residents could do because he was exploiting a loophole in planning regulations.
The AAP building is next to the St Nicholas RC Primary School in Jockey Road and parents fear that masts so close could harm children.
Government watchdogs have advised caution against siting masts next to schools.
AAP has repeatedly ignored the pleas and petitions and has previously tried to place masts on the roof of his building by telling planners they are mounting poles for security cameras.
By Neil Elkes, Evening Mail Brmingham. Jun 23 2005

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Birmingham:
Anger over phone mast decisions

Confusion with Birmingham planning decisions
A decision to refuse planning permission for a mobile phone mast just weeks after approval was granted for a similar structure nearby has baffled Oscott councillors.
Government planning inspectors upheld a decision to refuse permission for the mast on Queslett Road two weeks after Birmingham's planning committee gave the go-ahead for a similar application on the opposite side of the road.
Mobile phone firm O2 applied to Walsall Council earlier this year for permission to erect a ten metre high mast on land close to the junction of Queslett Road and Doe Bank Lane. Walsall's planning committee threw out the plans, forcing O2 to appeal.
The inspectors have now decided to back the council's original decision and refuse the proposal.
In the meantime, rival phone company T-Mobile applied to Birmingham Council for permission to site a 12 metre mast on land close to the Deer's Leap pub
Despite overwhelming opposition from local residents, Birmingham planners gave the green light to the scheme.
Ward Councillors John Cotton, Barbara Dring and Keith Linnecor, who led the fight against both applications, said that they were "baffled" by the different stance taken by the two local authorities.
Councillor Cotton said:"It simply beggars belief that one side of the Queslett Road can be ruled as wholly unsuitable for a mast by a Government-appointed inspector, while Birmingham's planners seem content to allow a mast to be put up on the opposite side of the road, just a matter of yards away.
"Residents are understandably angry at Birmingham's failure to defend their interests, compared to the tougher stance taken by Walsall Council".
Cllr Dring, who collected a 500-signature petition against the Deer's Leap mast, added: "The Planning Inspector's findings are correct and welcome, but I have to say that they will come as cold comfort to local people who have already been let down by Birmingham's decision to allow the Deer's Leap mast through without a fight."
Jun 16, 2005, 16:13 Great Barr Chronicle

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Billesley. Birmingham:
Time row in school mast bid Jun 1 2005

PARENTS and staff at a city school fear they are the victims of a "bury bad news" scandal over plans for a mobile phone mast.
Teachers at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Primary School, in Billesley, had only hours to notify parents and raise objections before the halfterm holiday.
They fear that the proposed 11.7m T-mobile mast may be a health risk to children and could be a blight on the Shire Country Park.
The park, known locally as the Dingles, was recently renamed The Shire after the picturesque land featured in Lord of Rings.
Head teacher Bernadette O'Shea sent a letter to parents just 48 hours before the school closed for half-term.
She said: "This is of great concern to us as a school as we have no evidence whether this installation will or will not be harmful to the children now or in the future."
Mrs O'Shea is urging parents to write to the planning department outlining their objections before next Wednesday's deadline.
She is worried the timing of the application just before half term may mean parents do not make their fears known to the council.
Birmingham City Council has planning guidance against siting masts within 200m of a school wherever possible, and this could fall foul of this.
The Government-backed Stewart Report recently urged caution over siting masts near to schools.
Although the same report, along with the mobile phone industry, concluded there is no evidence of a health risk.
By Neil Elkes, Evening Mail Birmingham

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Kenilworth.
People power triumphs in phone mast campaign
Prominent builders merchants Buildbase have pulled out of controversial plans to install a mobile phone mast after strong opposition from neighbours.
Managers performed a dramatic U-turn on negotiations with O2, as residents prepared to hold a demonstration outside Buildbase on Wednesday.
The Priory Road site is classed as industrial land but lies within a densely populated area, and is between Thorns Infant School and the Bertie Road nursery.
Residents were furious about the possibility of being subjected to the mast's radiation because of its perceived health risks and had considering organising boycotts and further demonstrations.
Stephanie Bennett, of Farmer Ward Road, said: "They told us at the 11th hour but nothing is definite and we all want it in black and white.
They said they had been given so much hassle from people going in and complaining that they decided to pull out.
Hopefully they will be true to their word.
"We are all concerned about the health scares - nobody will know for another generation how the air waves can affect people."
Buildbase manager Simon Davies said: "It was never our intention to cause any distress to the residents of Kenilworth.
Seeing the level of upset it was causing we decided to withdraw.
"This is the most supportive company I have ever worked for - we sponsor many local teams and events.
We want to work with local people and will continue to do what we can around the local area."
Mr Davies added that the plans submitted by O2 differed to negotiations between the two companies.
Neighbours will wait for official confirmation of the pull out before ending their protests.
Lee Woolman, of Farmer Ward Road, had said: "Residents are talking about civil disruption and taking matters into their own hands -
we are very upset about this. It is smack bang in the middle of a residential area and there are obvious health implications."
Neighbour Anthony Whitmore wrote in a letter to the Weekly News: "As the objection campaign gathers momentum, direct action has
not been ruled out by local residents."
Residents were also annoyed about a minimal public consultation.
Most only heard of 02's plans for the 15-metre high mast on Monday after they were submitted to Warwick District Council because only residents bordering Buildbase were consulted.
Many of those in Lockhart Close and Alexandra Court are tenants, and it is unclear whether letters sent there had reached landlords.
It was the third mobile phone mast plan in a month, following two applications from Vodafone for the corner of Beehive Hill and behind Oaks Precinct.
02 will now have to look elsewhere. But spokesperson Angela Johnson said: "There is no evidence of any risk to health from
these low radiation radio frequency emissions - they are much lower than a mobile phone itself.
"We are very limited to where we can put the cell sites to fit in with the rest of the cells in our network.
We are in a very difficult situation that everyone wants to use a mobile phone but no one wants a mast near where they live."
Kenilworth Today 17.06.05

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Kenilworth
To all who live in Kenilworth.

Phone mast must be stopped
Vodafone and other phone companies are putting up antennas around the town.
If they are given a licence to put one in the electricity substation in Caesar Road it will then put Kenilworth under a blanket of low to medium radiation.
This is something we do not want. It is time for us to tell Warwick District Council enough is enough.
We elect councillors to look after the people of Kenilworth and Warwickshire and not put them under the risk of radiation.
The council can do something about this now before it is too late by refusing Vodafone a licence.
If they do give them a licence are they also going to take out a multi-million pound insurance cover against any future claims
if it was proven radiation was the cause of people's cancers?
Because you the licensing authority, not knowing that it could not happen, would be partly responsible.
Letters to the Editor: Kenilworth Weekly News. 13 June 2005
From: Mr D Hands, Oaks Road, Kenilworth.

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Coleshill. Tamworth: MOBILE PHONE EMISSION FEARS
So, mobile provider O2 are confident emissions tests on a mobile phone mast at St Edward's RC School in Packington Lane, Coleshill, are well within (ICNIRP) emission guidelines are they? (Herald, May 19).
Well of course they will be! These ridiculously lenient guidelines were adopted by Government in 1992, in the technology's infancy, after subjecting animals to
20 minutes of this electro-magnetic radiation and then pronouncing it safe to humans! In addition, this 'research' only measured the thermal effects of this
radiation, not the biological effects.
Mast emissions will hardly ever be above these meaningless guidelines because, as independent research has shown, they were set 9,000 times too high,
i.e. human cells start to be affected at 9,000 times below the current limit.
Phone mast emissions are pulsed and low level. The major concern is the biological effect on the body, the ability to alter human cells.
Brain wave patterns pulse on a similar frequency to radiation emitted by these masts. Independent research shows that it is this pulsing frequency of the radiation emitted that causes headaches, sleep disturbance, rashes and fatigue.
More worryingly it also reduces melatonin, the cancer fighting hormone, being released from the pineal gland.
Even the Government's own advisers (the Stewart Report) confirm that this technology has not been proved safe.
John Elliott, Bristol.
Tamworth Herald - 02 June 2005
****************************************************
Kenilworth.
United stand against mast
Fears for the health of their children and the environment have prompted parents to tackle mobile phone giant Vodafone over a proposed mast.
The world's largest mobile phone company plans to construct a 12-metre high mast on the corner of Beehive Hill and Birmingham Road, yards away
from Priors Field School and even closer to resident's homes.
The planned mast falls short of the 15-metre limit, which requires planning permission and so is exempt from the need for formal consent from
Warwick District Council.
Arvine Bird, who lives opposite the proposed site and has three young children, said: "Warwickshire County Council has actually banned these masts on the top of school buildings so there is obviously a question mark over the safety of them.
"The health risks cannot be proven but this does not mean they can be disproved either."
Clinton Lane resident Bob Owens believes the mast is needed to improve reception in the area, particularly for photo messaging.
He said: "It will damage the environment - it is on the approach to Kenilworth, close to a school and nursery and will be within 15 metres of residents' properties. It is something we do not want.
"The people who are going to suffer will be the people around it and nobody is sure yet what damage these things can do."
Gillian Gould, a lunchtime supervisor at Priors Field, remembers fighting a similar plan by Orange seven years ago.
She said: "It's absolute madness to put a mast next to a school with over 200 children. The playing fields back right onto Chase Lane. Orange didn't get away with it when they tried so hopefully Vodafone won't either."
But Steve Maggs, who works as a scientist at the University of Warwick, said: "Most of the research done suggests there are no problems with any of these masts. It's not necessarily harmful and a lot of the concerns have been brought about by scaremongering."
Vodafone has embarked on a consultation process inviting nearby residents, schools, councils and councillors to give their opinions before making a final decision.
People living near the site have written their objections to ward councillors and Vodafone, and a petition has also been circulated in the neighbourhood.
Coun Michael Coker (Con, Abbey) said: "As far as the masts are concerned we have to approach them very carefully, one because they tend to be ugly and two because people are still concerned about the health aspects. Whether they are right or wrong I understand their feelings.
"My own feeling is that if we have to have them, they should be well away from houses in the middle of a field."
A spokeswoman for Vodafone explained that other potential locations had been investigated but this is a preferred site.
She added: "Nothing is set in stone. We will take people's views on board and then we will make a decision."
Kenilworth Today. 27 May 2005

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Stratford
MP JOINS CEMETERY PHONE MAST BATTLE
THE battle against plans to install a phone mast in Stratford Cemetery stepped up a notch as Stratford MP John Maples backed the campaign this week.
The MP has called on the town council to re-think proposals in the light of overwhelming public opposition.
Stratford on Avon Herald. 16.06.05

***************************************************
Stratford
PHONE MAST 'DESECRATES CEMETERY'
THE sanctity of Stratford Cemetery will be destroyed if plans for a mobile phone mast go ahead, it was claimed yesterday (Wednesday).
Campaigners trying to stop the 17-metre-high mast from being put on the chapel in the Evesham Road burial ground will stage a six-hour protest on Saturday.
Dozens of residents, some of whose relatives are buried at the cemetery, are expected to turn out.
Hutchinson 3G made the bid to install the mast there after their original plans to site it at the junction of Evesham Road and Halford Road withdrew the proposal in the face of local opposition which also won the support of Stratford MP John Maples.
Objections to siting the mast on the cemetery chapel were first raised at the annual town meeting in March when electors voted against it by 11 votes to eight with seven abstentions.
Stratford Herald

*********************************************
Stratford
Demo held over chapel mast plan
A six-hour demonstration has been taking place in opposition to plans to put up a mobile telephone mast in a Warwickshire cemetery.
Hutchinson 3G wants to attach the 17-metre structure to the chapel of Stratford Cemetery on Evesham Road.
A Stratford Town Council spokeswoman said the work would barely change the chapel and that the mast was due to be erected in about six weeks.
The demonstrators held the protest outside the cemetery gates on Saturday.
BBC News website

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Stratford
THE sanctity of Stratford Cemetery will be destroyed if plans for a mobile phone mast go ahead, it was claimed yesterday (Wednesday).
Campaigners trying to stop the 17-metre-high mast from being put on the chapel in the Evesham Road burial ground will stage a six-hour protest on Saturday.
Dozens of residents, some of whose relatives are buried at the cemetery, are expected to turn out.
Hutchinson 3G made the bid to install the mast there after their original plans to site it at the junction of Evesham Road and Halford Road withdrew the proposal in the face of local opposition which also won the support of Stratford MP John Maples.
Objections to siting the mast on the cemetery chapel were first raised at the annual town meeting in March when electors voted against it by 11 votes to eight with seven abstentions.
Stratford Herald 8th June 2004

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Tamworth
AGENCY CALLED IN TO LOOK AT PHONE MAST HEALTH EFFECTS

The Health Protection Agency has been called in to analyse the results of a survey which appears to show that a high number of Coleshill residents and schoolchildren are suffering with health problems.
Warwickshire County Council has asked the independent agency - set up to provide protection against health dangers including radiation - to investigate residents' fears about phone masts.
The news comes after dozens of parents temporarily withdrew their children from St Edward's Catholic Primary School and Warwickshire County Council
called for a mast next to the school to be removed.
County council officials say the health of the children at the school is 'a prime concern' and, although emissions tests conducted on behalf of mast owners
O2 showed levels 995 times below the permitted maximum, the authority opposes the mast 'on a matter of principle'.
Eric Wood, county education officer, said: "We will support anything that we can do to remove it, and would urge O2 to relocate the mast for the peace of
mind of the local community."
Gill Owen, headteacher of St Edward's, said: "Like the parents I am uneasy about the presence of the mast, and I am happy for them to campaign against it.
But I would ask that they continue to conduct matters through the appropriate channels, and ensure that their children's education continues unaffected
while this matter is being resolved."
However, parents say they plan to protest again from 9am on Friday and every Friday until the matter is resolved.
Tamworth Herald. - 30 June 2005

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Coleshill. Tamworth:
MOBILE PHONE EMISSION FEARS

So, mobile provider O2 are confident emissions tests on a mobile phone mast at St Edward's RC School in Packington Lane, Coleshill, are well
within (ICNIRP) emission guidelines are they? (Herald, May 19).
Well of course they will be! These ridiculously lenient guidelines were adopted by Government in 1992, in the technology's infancy, after
subjecting animals to 20 minutes of this electro-magnetic radiation and then pronouncing it safe to humans! In addition, this 'research' only
measured the thermal effects of this radiation, not the biological effects.
Mast emissions will hardly ever be above these meaningless guidelines because, as independent research has shown, they were set 9,000
times too high, i.e. human cells start to be affected at 9,000 times below the current limit.
Phone mast emissions are pulsed and low level. The major concern is the biological effect on the body, the ability to alter human cells.
Brain wave patterns pulse on a similar frequency to radiation emitted by these masts. Independent research shows that it is this pulsing
frequency of the radiation emitted that causes headaches, sleep disturbance, rashes and fatigue.
More worryingly it also reduces melatonin, the cancer fighting hormone, being released from the pineal gland.
Even the Government's own advisers (the Stewart Report) confirm that this technology has not been proved safe.
John Elliott, Bristol. Tamworth Herald.- 02 June 2005

********************
Tamwort
BID TO MOVE MAST

Legal experts have been called in to investigate whether the mobile phone mast at St Edward's RC Primary School in Coleshill can be pulled down in light of concerns over safety.
Warwickshire LEA bosses have ordered the authority's solicitor to begin an urgent investigation into the deeds of the land on which the mast stands, which was sold to British Telecom by the council 11 years ago.
News of the action was announced on the day mast protestors delivered an informal health survey to the school which appears to show that 98 per cent of pupils are suffering from health problems including headaches, nausea, itchy eyes, tiredness or nosebleeds.
County education officer Eric Wood said: "We are concerned at the issues being raised, in particular legal aspects to do with the use of the land on which the mobile phone mast is situated.
"We are asking the county solicitor to investigate as a matter of urgency because the legal and health and safety concerns of the parents must be treated seriously and dealt with as promptly as possible."

The survey, carried out with parents of 200 children at the school, was not sanctioned by Warwickshire County Council, although it is believed no objections were raised to it being circulated to parents.
But the findings have been seen by headteacher, Gillian Owen, who issued a statement to the Herald saying she shares the concern of the parents and supports them in their campaign to have the mast removed.
"They are leading this effort allowing me to concentrate on the busy day-to-day task of running a successful school. "I look forward to hearing of the developments but am not taking an active part in the group that is looking at this serious issue," she said.
The survey was prepared by mast protestors Jackie Slater and Geraldine Canavan with advice from physicist Dr John Walker - who worked with action group SCRAM in their successful fight against the Wishaw mast.
Scientist Anne Silk, who learned of the survey results in a meeting on May 27, is now presenting the findings to a meeting of the World Health Organisation in Geneva on June 15, to call for a national effort to study the health of every child whose school is close to a phone mast.
Tamworth herald. LINDSEY SMITH. - 09 June 2005

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Sutton Coldfield
MAST LOOPHOLE

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He has instead sidestepped a costly legal action and enforcement by removing the offending masts and putting temporary ones on a trailer next door.
Sandra O'Keefe said: "This means we have to start the legal battle all over again and in the meantime Mr Alexander is lining his pockets for the next few months."
Sutton Coldfield Labour activist and local resident Dr Rob Pocock said: "It's simply no good relying on planning law to restrict masts.
"We have a total merry-go-round with the Union Drive case, the condemned mast is replaced by a temporary affair and we have to go right back to step one again.
"There needs to be a firm and clear legal exclusion zone for masts in the wide vicinity of sensitive areas such as schools, not on planning grounds but on the potential risk to children's health," he added.
Mr Alexander did not reply to calls from the Evening Mail.
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Coventry
Masts - the slow death of democracy?'

Phone masts 'unstoppable'
A city councillor is complaining about laws which he says allow phone companies a lot of freedom in putting up mobile phone masts.
Cllr Gary Ridley (Con, Sherbourne) highlighted the national issue while backing electors who are protesting against a second mobile phone mast near
their homes.
T-Mobile recently won approval to put a 36ft mast, disguised as a street light, at the junction of Holyhead Road and Grayswood Avenue, Chapelfields.
It was previously turned down for a higher mast in the same place because it would look "conspicuous and incongruous" .
Cllr Ridley criticised national rules which mean councils cannot turn down masts less than 58.5ft high except on a few criteria.
He said: "In reality, the council could not stop this mast from going ahead but these masts have quietly and slyly taken over our living environment and
local people can do nothing to stop them.
"This is the slow death of democracy."
Phone companies have by law "permitted development rights" for phone masts, meaning they do not have to apply for full planning permission.
Instead, they give notice of going ahead and councils have a limited time in which to protest.
Cllr Ridley added: "The government ignored independent recommendations to revoke mobile operators' permitted development [rights] which would
have meant operators applying for full planning permission - meaning local people continue to be ignored.
"No-one wants to live near these things - they are ugly, intrusive and they may well start to affect the local house prices."
People living nearby fear there's a health risk - even though T-Mobile had to submit documentation showing any radiation from the mast was
within approved national guidelines.
Anne Martin, of Bevington Crescent, Coundon, said: "Our main fear is the unknown risks to health.
If you start reading up on it all, it's not proven either way.
"There's already one [a phone mast] on that corner and there are others in that area that we know of."
By Fiona Scott Evening Telegraph Coventry. Jul 6 2005

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Coventry
Council calls for phone mast removal
Warwickshire County Council is calling for a mobile phone mast sited near a Coleshill school to be removed.
The county's Education Officer, Eric Wood, said he sympathised with parents at St Edward's Catholic Primary School, who have expressed fears
for the health of their children.
"So far there has not been any conclusive evidence that the mast does pose a health risk to the children at the school, however we are against the
mast as a matter of principle," Mr Wood said.
"We will support anything that we can do to remove it, and would urge O2 to relocate the mast for the peace of mind of the local community.
"I would ask parents, however, to operate within the bounds of the law, and to ensure that their children continue to attend school while this matter
is being resolved."
Efforts to find a way to insist the mast be moved for legal reasons, relating to a covenant on the land, have so far failed.
Evening Telegraph Coventry. Jul 4 2005

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Lichfield
The truth is the majority don't want 3G phones!
Warning over mobile phone plans
Another phone mast could soon be on its way to Lichfield city centre, and it will not be the last, a leading campaigner warned today.
Orange wants to install a 22.5m mast in Davidson Road behind Lichfield City Railway Station.
David Brain, from campaign group Stowe Concerned Residents Against Masts (SCRAM), criticised the application but fears there will be more mast bids
because of the determination of phone giants to install new poles for 3G technology.
Mr Brain, who successfully led a fight to stop Vodafone putting up a 25m mast off Eastern Avenue, claimed the majority of people did not even want the 3G technology on their phones.
The Davidson Road proposal would include an antennae and four dishes on a concrete tower on Sellrite Automotive.
Mr Brain said: “There will be continuing pressure in Lichfield and everywhere else. The vast majority of people do not want this massive proliferation
of masts.

They don’t want 3G.”
Mr Brain said mobile phone giants had forked out billions for 3G licences from the government.
He said: “These companies have so much money they are throwing money at agents to get these applications in and all that stands in their way
are a small number of individuals trying to help protect people.”
The SCRAM chairman said phone mast applications were a problem across the country and added the sheer volume of application could eventually
wear down protesters’ opposition.
Lichfield has seen a spate of applications in recent months, which have been fought by groups like SCRAM and Boley Park Action Group, which successfully battled a planned mast in Darnford Lane.
The plans for the Davidson Road mast are available for inspection at Lichfield District Council’s offices, in Frog Lane.
A spokesman for Orange was unavailable for comment.
By Stuart Pollitt The Chronicle West Midlands. Jul 5, 2005

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Source: Peter and Ann. W-A-R-T

Westmorland:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
Coming soon.

Wiltshire:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
Trowbridge: PROTESTERS WIN FIGHT OVER MOBILE MAST

Mobile phone mast protesters are celebrating after persuading a mobile phone company to drop controversial plans to site a mast at a residential location
in Trowbridge. Mobile phone giant O2 has bowed to pressure from College Estate Residents' Association to find an alternative site for the mast,
which was set for the corner of College Road and Willow Grove.
Although planning permission had been granted for the project, residents kept up the pressure on O2 and a compromise has now been reached.
The telecommunications company has agreed not to place the equipment on the street corner, which is next to a block of flats for the elderly.
Instead, it is submitting a planning application to have the mast installed on the roof of the Edington Building at nearby Wiltshire College.
The change of heart has come after members of the residents' association and Cllr Sarah Content met company officials to express their concerns.
Residents complained the original proposed site was close to many homes and primary schools.
Association chairman Derek Adams said he was delighted at the outcome.
"I think everyone will be very pleased about this change of heart," he said.
"A lot of people found it very worrying to have a mast so close to home. I have to thank everyone who supported us, signed the petition and turned
up at a public meeting to discuss this."
The association is poised to formally back O2's alternative proposals at its next meeting.
Cllr Jeff Osborn, who represents the Trowbridge College ward on West Wiltshire District Council, said: "It is really good to see that a suitable
compromise seems to be close now. Everyone has behaved responsibly and they have listened to each other. I am delighted."
Cllr Content, who also represents Trowbridge College, said: "Telecommunication masts are becoming increasingly contentious due to confusion
and uncertainty about possible health risks from the Government and independent research groups."
Bath Chronicle. - 25 May 2005

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Marlborough Mast Appeal Allowed by Inspector

A very black day for the town of Marlborough in Wiltshire.
After many years of fighting two inappropriate 3g mast developments for Crown Castle in the centre of Marlborough's residential area, one man,
Inspector Ces Cunningham, has decided that they pose no risk to our health and that they will not detract from the Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding
Natural Beauty (ANOB). Nor apparently, will it have any impact on the Listed Buildings and Conservation area that they will be built next to.
What is wrong with the democratic process in this country?
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Protesters force rethink

PRESSURE from electors has forced members of Pewsey Parish Council to reconsider its position over plans for a mobile phone mast on
the village soccer field.
More than 50 villagers attended the parish council meeting on Tuesday and their delight was obvious when the council agreed to think again.
The council owns the soccer ground between the High Street and Ball Road and in the past agreed to allow the Pewsey Vale Football Club
to sub-let the site following an approach by service provider O2, who wanted to put up a phone mast.
The deal would be worth £80,000 to the club over 20 years.
However, the parish council objected to initial plans for the 17 metre mast and it was turned down by Kennet District Council.
This week an appeal by O2 was dismissed by the planning inspectorate on the grounds that other possible sites around the village needed more evaluation.
But even before the appeal decision was announced, O2 had submitted plans for a taller mast on the site.
Objectors, fearing possible health risks to children playing near the mast, felt the parish council had let them down by agreeing that the site
could be sub-let.
On Tuesday there were allegations from some villagers that the councillors had failed to represent the views of the electorate.
Councillors agreed to re-debate whether the soccer club can sub-let to O2. Its planning committee will discuss the mast application on Wednesday at 7.30pm in the parish offices.
Wiltshire Gazette and Herald 21.07.05

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Pewsey
02 bombarding Wiltshire site

Phone mast campaigners gear up for second battle
CAMPAIGNERS against a mobile phone mast on a sports ground in Pewsey have been horrified to learn of a new application for an even taller
transmitter.
They are pinning their hopes of defeating the mast plans on the parish council that owns the soccer ground between Ball Road and the High Street.
On Tuesday the parish council will be discussing whether it should allow its tenant, Pewsey Vale FC, to let O2 put up a mast at the soccer ground.
The soccer club stands to gain £80,000 over 20 years if it allows the mast. However, objectors say the football club is only a tenant and that the parish council should have the final say.
They also argue that covenants restricting the use of the land to sport and recreation imposed when the parish council acquired the land in 1949
from the former Pewsey Rural District Council still apply.
A previous planning application for an O2 mast on the ground was refused by Kennet District Council and is subject of an appeal.
This week campaigners learned O2 has submitted a new planning application for slightly taller mast.
Petitions have been circulating in Pewsey urging the parish council to stick by the covenants. Campaigners are urging villagers to attend Tuesday's
parish council meeting, at 7.30pm in the Bouverie Hall, when O2's plan will be discussed.
Gazette and Herald Wiltshire 14.07.05
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Ilkley:
Why a whole lot of new masts are lining up? Because of Government interference and a council not considering people
Council bows to operators because of Appeal, and Phone mast approved despite objections

A controversial plan to erect a mobile phone mast within 170 metres of Great Bedwyn Primary School has been approved despite concerns about the children's health. Vodafone's telecommunications base station at Wansdyke Crossing in Little Bedwyn will be the fourth mast within 400 metres of the school.
The regulatory committee of Kennet District Council approved the application by seven votes to five after hearing that a recent Appeal Court
decision meant that the telecom giants would almost certainly win any appeal against refusal.
Gordon Stone, chairman of Great Bedwyn parish council, told the meeting last Thursday that there was grave concern because the site was so close to the school and there were already three masts within 400 metres.
He said that a report into the health dangers of mobile phone masts by a committee led by Sir William Stewart had recommended that masts
should not be erected within 400m of schools.
Coun Rosemary Cummins, the member for Bedwyn, not only stressed the health dangers, but was also incredulous that Vodafone was
planning to erect the mast so close to the Wansdyke.
She said the mast was likely to damage a national historic monument and that Vodafone had "completely disregarded the historic importance
of the site."
Mike Wilmott, Kennet's chief planning officer, said that the mast was not going to be placed on the Wansdyke itself but close to it.
He also said that, if the applicants were able to prove that the mast's emissions were within safety guidelines, the council would be laughed
out of court at any appeal.
Committee chairman Coun John Booth said that he would be more sympathetic to the protesters if children were banned from having mobiles,
which had far higher emissions than masts .
The council's legal officer Mike Rowan said that a recent Appeal Court decision had found in favour of masts and the council would lose with
substantial costs in the event of an appeal.
Marlborough Gazette and Herald. Date Published: Thursday 16 June 2005
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Trowbridge. Bath: 02 beaten off for now as PROTESTERS WIN FIGHT OVER MOBILE MAST

Mobile phone mast protesters are celebrating after persuading a mobile phone company to drop controversial plans to site a mast at a residential
location in Trowbridge. Mobile phone giant O2 has bowed to pressure from College Estate Residents' Association to find an alternative site for the mast,
which was set for the corner of College Road and Willow Grove.
Although planning permission had been granted for the project, residents kept up the pressure on O2 and a compromise has now been reached.
The telecommunications company has agreed not to place the equipment on the street corner, which is next to a block of flats for the elderly.
Instead, it is submitting a planning application to have the mast installed on the roof of the Edington Building at nearby Wiltshire College.
The change of heart has come after members of the residents' association and Cllr Sarah Content met company officials to express their concerns.
Residents complained the original proposed site was close to many homes and primary schools.
Association chairman Derek Adams said he was delighted at the outcome.
"I think everyone will be very pleased about this change of heart," he said.
"A lot of people found it very worrying to have a mast so close to home.
I have to thank everyone who supported us, signed the petition and turned up at a public meeting to discuss this."
The association is poised to formally back O2's alternative proposals at its next meeting.
Cllr Jeff Osborn, who represents the Trowbridge College ward on West Wiltshire District Council, said:
"It is really good to see that a suitable compromise seems to be close now. Everyone has behaved responsibly and they have listened to each other.
I am delighted."
Cllr Content, who also represents Trowbridge College, said: "Telecommunication masts are becoming increasingly contentious due to
confusion and uncertainty about possible health risks from the Government and independent research groups."
Bath Chronicle - 25 May 2005

Worcestershire:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
Bromsgrove: Protest over phone mast

PARENTS worried about the effects a mobile phone mast may have on their children's health took to the streets to highlight their campaign to have it resited.
T-mobile wants to put up a 12-metre high mast, disguised as a telegraph pole, near a filling station on the brow of Old Birmingham Road.
The site is just 70 metres from Rhymes Nursery.
The toddlers' parents are not happy about the plan and last Friday Bromsgrove's MP Julie Kirkbride joined in their protest.
Residents and parents have previously met with representatives from the phone company to voice their fears over the long-term health risks
from the mast.
Then it was agreed that T-mobile would look at alternative sites suggested by residents.
Miss Kirkbride said: "I really would appeal to T-mobile to reconsider the location.
This is a purpose-built nursery offering first-class facilities. If mobile phone companies have a policy of not locating masts near schools,
they should apply that policy to nurseries."
Beacon Labour county councillor Peter McDonald, who originally took up the residents' concerns, also urged the company to give serious
thought to the residents' pleas.
"I sincerely hope they heed the genuine concerns many people have. If parents remove their children because of the mast it could have serious
consequences for the nursery," he said.
Parent Mark Bromhall's comment was typical of many. He said: "Our children should be protected.
Asbestos and smoking were once considered safe.
It takes a long time for the effects to become known."
John Shaughnessy, a spokesman for T-mobile, said his company is currently examining the eight alternative locations suggested by residents
and parents to see if they are suitable from a point of view of access and network coverage.
This is Bromsgrove 19.07.05
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Dudley: Another MP calling for changes,

Calls for tougher stance on masts

Mobile phone masts should be subject to stricter planning laws to stop them being built outside schools and houses, the MP for Dudley North has said.
Ian Austin wants the government to bring in extra safeguards for towers planned near schools, homes and medical centres.
He also wants fears over possible health concerns addressed.
Under current planning legislation they can only turned down by local councils if masts are considered to have a detrimental impact, either visually
or if they affect an area economically by reducing property prices. Authorities cannot currently turn down applications on health grounds.
Mr Austin launched his campaign after hearing that mobile phone giants T-Mobile and Vodafone had submitted applications to build masts near to
houses on Setton Road, in Sedgley, and opposite Bramford Primary School, on Tipton Road, in Dudley.
Mr Austin said he shared residents' concerns over the masts and that he wanted to find a solution to the problem that councils have with
planning applications.
The MP said: "Residents in Woodsetton and at Milking Bank are very concerned about the proposed new masts.
"I am on their side, I understand their concerns and have received hundreds of responses to lend weight to my call for the council to sling these
applications out.
"But I want to find a permanent solution to the problem too, which is why I'm campaigning in Parliament for stricter planning laws and extra safeguards
near schools, homes and medical facilities."
* What do you think? Ring us on 01384 353 211 Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm
Jul 14, 2005, 14:46

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Kidderminster:
Residents in mast victory

VICTORIOUS residents are celebrating after persuading councillors to throw out plans for a third mobile phone mast close to their homes.
Several hundred people mounted a forceful campaign against their neighbourhood, around Stourport Road, being turned into a "dumping ground for masts."
This week, the district council's planning development control committee voted against an officer's recommendation for approval and refused the bid by
02 to build a 15m mast behind Charlie Brown's Autos, off Lisle Avenue.
Protest co-ordinator, Anita Gallagher, of Communities Against Mobile Masts, said residents were "overjoyed" by the decision and she thanked all those involved.
More than 100 protest letters, a 635-named petition and postcards with pictures showing how residents felt the area had already been blighted by a Vodafone mast in the same location had been sent to councillors.
Mrs Gallagher, whose home in Hospital Lodge is 130m from the site, said: "We are not a dumping ground for mobile masts."
Kiddermister Shuttle
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Droitwich
Mobile phone mast go-ahead on appeal

PLANNING bosses have given the green light to a controversial mobile phone mast despite strong opposition in Droitwich Spa.
An application by Hutchison 3G for permission to erect the mast on the Yew Tree Hill water tower had originally been refused by Wychavon District Council because of its visual impact.
But now planners have said the scheme can go ahead after the company appealed to the Planning Inspectorate, based in Bristol.
Inspectors decided the site satisfies the Government guidelines, and although they were aware of a number of concerns regarding the health effects of the masts, it is the view of the Government that the planning system is not the place for determining health safeguards.
Senior planning officer for Wychavon District Council, Robert Peel said: "Planning officers originally recommended permission be granted because it complied with planning laws but councillors on the planning committee chose to refuse the application, as is their right."
Droitwich Spa Town Council, which is not the planning authority but makes recommendations to the district council, has a policy of recommending refusal of 3G phone masts until more is known about health implications.
The tower is already used as a site for several companies' mobile phone masts but this scheme will be its first 3G mast.
Mayor Richard Morris said: "I feel our planning laws are very outdated if they do not allow us to consider the health and wellbeing of the people in our town as well as the volume of mobile communications on one site.
"I urge people to write to the Deputy Prime Minister and ask for a significant change in the planning laws so they more effectively consider people and not big business."
A spokesman for Hutchison 3G said all their base stations had been shown to work well within the radiation protection guidelines and overall evidence suggested they were unlikely to pose a risk to health.
Droitwich Star Advertiser

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Warndon Villages: Worcester:
A 32 feet high mobile phone mast could be installed in a residential Worcester street.
Planners at the city council are considering whether phone firm O2 should be allowed to build the mast on the west side of Woodgreen Drive,
opposite Dugdale Drive, in Warndon Villages.
Worcester Evening News. 130605

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Tolladine. Worcester

OBJECTORS have lost their battle to prevent a mobile phone mast from being erected in Worcester.
At a Worcester City Council's planning committee meeting yesterday, members voted in favour of the Vodafone mast, at Tolladine Golf Course, after hearing that they could not justify refusing it on safety grounds.
They were told by planning manager Peter Yates that the 18m mast, which would be sited 200m away from the nearest house met national and international safety guidelines.
"This meets the safety standards very generously," he said.
"YOU GET THAT AMOUNT OF RADIATION FROM A STEAM IRON - it is well within the Government guidelines."
The mast will be disguised as a tree will be placed within a row of existing conifer trees.
Objector Gerard Foster, of Home Meadow in Warndon Villages said: "We question the effectiveness of the disguise.
"You must consider the health risks."
The application was passed on the grounds that a generator would only be used as a back-up in the case of a power cut and that equipment on the mast and ground must be effectively disguised.
Worcester Evening News: 11 March 2005

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Warndon Villages. Worcester.

Our kids are at risk from mast
PARENTS close to a golf course where there are plans to build a mobile phone mast say they are worried about the effect it could have on their children's health.
Mother-of-two Cathy Foster, of Cover Green, Warndon Villages, says she would consider moving home if the mast went up on Tolladine Golf Course.
She and her neighbours are going to raise objections at Worcester City Council's planning meeting.
Mrs Foster, who has two children, aged 10 months and three-and-a-half years, says the proximity of the proposed mast made her fear for the future for them and other children in the area.
"There are just too many uncertainties," she said.
"It's not just the health risk but I'm sure it would devalue the house, too.
"The mast is going to be only about 250 metres from my house and I just don't want my kids to be guinea pigs in this kind of experiment.
"Perhaps there's no conclusive body of evidence at the moment to say what dangers there are but I don't want my kids to be placed in any danger, especially when they are still so young and vulnerable."
As reported in last week's Evening News, Vodafone has applied for permission to build the mast on the course disguised as a fir tree.
"We well understand that people do have concerns about health but all our masts comply with stringent international guidelines," said spokeswoman for Vodafone Jane Frapwell.
"We do want to protect all sectors of the public, whether they are one metre away from the mast or 1,000 metres away.
"These are World Health Organisation guidelines and they say there are no adverse health effects if these guidelines are met."
But Warndon Parish (South) City Councillor Lucy Hodgson said she supported residents' objections.
"The residents from Cover Green are extremely unhappy about the proposed mast for Vodafone on the golf course," she said.
"I am fully backing their campaign and will be objecting to the mast.
"We are getting letters written to the planning department but would like to alert as many people in the surrounding area as possible that this mast is being proposed," she added.
Worcester Evening News 16 February 2005

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Tolladine. Worcester.

A SECOND mobile phone mast is likely to be put up on Tolladine Golf Course.
Vodafone has put in a planning application for a mast disguised as a fir tree to improve its mobile coverage.
It follows criticisms the company received from the city council after it put up a temporary mast without planning permission last year.
Residents in The Fairway, off Tolladine Road, complained because the mast was not disguised and needed a noisy generator to power it.
But the new mast will be some way from homes and disguised as a tree - although it will have a standby generator that will reach 60 decibels at night.
A similar mast, put up by mobile phone company 3, has been on the course for two years.

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Second mobile phone mast for golf course on the cards
A SECOND mobile phone mast is likely to be put up on Tolladine Golf Course.
Vodafone has put in a planning application for a mast disguised as a fir tree to improve its mobile coverage.
*** It follows criticisms the company received from the city council after it put up a temporary mast without planning permission last year.
Residents in The Fairway, off Tolladine Road, complained because the mast was not disguised and needed a noisy generator to power it.
But the new mast will be some way from homes and disguised as a tree - although it will have a standby generator that will reach 60 decibels at night.
A similar mast, put up by mobile phone company 3, has been on the course for two years.
Floodgates:
Warndon Parish Council raised no objection to the latest plans, although member Frank Lauriello warned that it could set a precedent.
"This could open the floodgates so there could be more up there before long.
"What if Orange, for example, comes along and wants to put up a mast?
"It's very important that these things stay in keeping with the environment."
***A temporary mast, on the back of a trailer, was put up last November under cover of darkness prompting what
Worcester City Council's principal planning officer Peter Yates called an "exchange of views" between him and Vodafone.
The temporary mast was taken away and the new planning application has now been submitted.
The application will now go before Worcester City Council's planning committee for approval, taking into account the views of the parish council and other people affected.
Worcester Evening News 09 February 2005:

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Kidderminster:
Residents' fury at mast plans

ANGRY residents battling plans to put three mobile phone masts on the same Kidderminster site say the area is in danger of becoming
a "dumping ground" for masts.
A 12 metre monopole has already been put up on the Charlie Brown site in Stourport Road, shocking many neighbouring householders,
who had not realised planning permission had been granted when it appeared.
They were horrified to discover - just days later - that two separate applications had been submitted to Wyre Forest District Council to
build another two masts on the same land.
One of the proposals, for a 15 metre Hutchinson 3G mast, will be discussed at the district council's planning and environmental
control committee meeting on Tuesday and residents are desperately trying to make their fears known in the meantime.
Stourport Road resident, Anita Gallagher, whose husband, Tony, will address councillors to explain the opposition to the plan,
said householders had formed a group called Communities Against Mobile Masts and filled their windows with posters saying
"Say No To Masts".
This is Kidderminster

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Lymm. Warrington: T-Mobile mast plan
PLANS have been submitted to Warrington Borough Council to erect a phone mast in Lymm.
Mobile phone giant T-Mobile has submitted proposals to build a 15-metre mast at land at Sowbrook Wastewater Station on Lymmhay Lane in the village.

Posters blitz against mast plan
Hundreds of people have organised a massive poster blitz against plans for a third mobile phone mast on their doorsteps in Kidderminster.
Residents in Stourport Road have plastered their homes with the striking yellow posters, with messages including "ET didn't need a mast
that big to phone home", "Kids not quids" and "Health not wealth".
The campaign has been launched by resident Anita Gallagher after the firm Hutchinson won a battle to erect a 49ft high pole behind Charlie Brown's Autos off Lisle Avenue on Tuesday night.
Vodafone has already build its mast on the same site - and O2 is expected to be successful with an application shortly.
A 54-name petition and 45 letters of objection were submitted to Wyre Forest District Council by people living near the site ahead of Tuesday's planning meeting, but to no avail.
Now residents, many of whom fought off plans to build an incinerator on their doorsteps, are demanding that no more masts are built.
Mrs Gallagher said: "We did have a laugh when we came up with the poster slogans, especially the 'ET phone home' message.
"We just fear for people's health, but we are told we are not allowed to object on health grounds."
Cheryl Jones, of Stourport Road, fears that health problems will be caused by the masts.
She said: "I'm disgusted by it all. We don't know what health risks are behind all of this."
Samantha Windridge, of Lisle Avenue, said: "We feel that we are not being listened to."
Deputy leader of Wyre Forest District Council Marcus Hart said: "I do feel very sorry for the residents, but the Government set us guidelines
saying that we can only refuse applications on siting and appearance."
By Ben Smallman. Jun 11, 2005, Kidderminster Express and Star
Warrington Guardian

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Halesowen Councillor wages war on masts
Bid to screen 'joke' phone mast schemes

Radical plans to stop phone mast applications that "waste tax payers' money" have been unveiled by a Halesowen councillor.
Hayley Green and Cradley South Councillor Ken Turner wants to initiate six-monthly meetings between mobile phone giants and planning bosses.
The move comes three years after initial attempts to launch the scheme failed due to lack of support.
Councillor Turner said two current applications - one on green belt in Lutley Mill Road and one just yards from Huntingtree Primary School - were so outrageous they should not even go before Dudley Council's development control panel.
He said: "Both the application for the school and for the green belt land in Lutley Mill Road are a joke.
"If someone can provide me with evidence that these masts are safe to be near children I will not try to stop them being put up - but that has not yet happened.
"Any mast on green belt land will be out of place and totally alien to the environment.
We shouldn't be wasting the development control committee's time and money with this sort of thing.
Councillor Turner was instrumental in abortive plans to arrange regular meetings with mobile phone firm representatives in 2002.
"We had difficulties last time getting members to come along but I think things have changed quite dramatically since then.
"I think the time is now right for councillors to get together around a table with people from the mobile companies and look after residents' interests."
He said phone company representatives could bring prospective plans for applications to meetings where issues could be ironed out ahead of the more costly planning process.
A spokeswoman for Vodafone said they would be in favour of the proposals.
"We are always very happy to talk to local councillors and make use of their extensive knowledge of the area," she said.
A spokesman for Dudley Council said no objections had been received from members of the public on either the Lutley Mill Road or
Huntingtree Primary School applications.
By Richard Williams Halesowen Chronicle
Jun 17, 2005, 09:39

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Salwarpe:
Illegally-erected mast taken down

Mobile phone giant Vodafone is dismantling a mast it put up illegally in a Worcestershire village.
The company erected a cabin and a mast in Salwarpe last October without planning permission.
Villagers objected to the installation in a conservation area. Wychavon District Council gave Vodafone until Tuesday to take it all down.
A company spokesperson said the mast's generator was turned off last week so it was no longer operating.
They added that the mast and equipment would be dismantled by the end of the month.
BBC news website 24 may 05

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Salwarpe.
Calls for `illegal' phone mast veto
A MOBILE phone mast has been put up in a village near Droitwich without planning permission or consultation
The Vodafone third generation (3G) mast appeared - to villagers' amazement - in a private field in Salwarpe.
But residents say they are outraged that the communications giant has no planning permission for the transmitter and that it failed to let anyone know it was erecting the mast last week.
"I have received many letters from residents who are very angry about this," said Wychavon councillor, Andrew Christian-Brookes.
"If a member of the public builds a house without permission, Wychavon District Council would use the law to stop them and force them to take it down.
"No resident could build a house and then say `it's OK, we will come back in six months with a planning application'.
"There cannot be a rule for one, and one for another. Vodafone must stick to rules like everyone else."
Villagers had at first believed that farm building work was going on but then a 50ft mast appeared.
Mr Christian-Brookes said that he and residents would now be officially objecting to the mast and hoped that legal action would be taken against Vodafone.
Principal area planning officer for Wychavon, Mike Hurst, confirmed the council had received a letter from Vodafone asking for planners' views on a possible mast but that no permission had been granted.
"We are aware of the mast. Vodafone has jumped the gun and we are now investigating the situation," he said.
A spokesman for Vodafone said the antenna was only a temporary structure but said the company would be applying for planning permission for a permanent mast to be put up somewhere on the site.
"The mast is in a rural area and tall trees around the area minimise its visual impact," said the spokeswoman.
Farmer and owner of the land, Mike Davis, said he did not wish to comment on the issue.
Worcester Evening News 04 November 2004

Yorkshire:
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jul 2005
York:
Phone mast row decision due
A council and residents in need of educating!

A MOBILE phone mast row is set to be decided next week when councillors consider plans for two in the Fulford area of York.
T-Mobile have applied for permission of a 14.7-metre telecommunications pole with three antennae at the junction of Broadway and Heslington Lane,
and for an identical pole in Heslington Lane opposite the former Fairways Garden Centre.
City of York Council officers are recommending that no objections should be raised to the Broadway application, saying it would not cause undue harm to
public health, residential amenity or the area's character and appearance.
But they are recommending refusal for the other proposal, saying it is inappropriate in the Green Belt and would cause harm to the area's character and appearance.
However, Coun Keith Aspden, the Liberal Democrat councillor for Fulford, is calling for the east area planning and transport committee, which meets next Thursday, to vote the other way round.
He told the Evening Press there had been a long-running battle by local residents over a number of years to keep telecommunications poles away from their houses, and only one of the schemes needed approval to give the network the coverage it required.
He said all residents were very concerned about the impact of poles on their area, but if they were required, the correct sites must be selected.
Coun Aspden said: "The application opposite the former garden centre has much more public support - across all political parties in Fulford - and I hope that the planning committee rejects the officers' recommendation of refusal for this site."
He said the site was preferable to the Broadway scheme because it would have a lower impact on the living conditions of people nearby, as it would be 80 metres away instead of next to their homes.
He said: "We need to work with residents on telecommunication applications not against them."
Officers said seven objections had been received to the Broadway scheme, claiming the mast would be an eyesore, lower the values of nearby properties and be too close to playing areas and homes.
However, the other scheme had received only one objection, saying that the mast would harm Walmgate Stray, but three letters had been received in support, saying it would be further away from homes.
by Chris Greenwood York Today
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Wakefield:
Another club losing revenue for now

Mast kicked into touch
CONTROVERSIAL plans to site a phone mast close to an infant school have been refused, to the delight of 'ecstatic' residents.
Anger about the T-Mobile mast proposed by Ossett Albion FC was so strong that locals formed a pressure group to fight the plans for the Dimplewells Road site.
Ossett Residents Against Mobile Masts (ORAMM) presented a petition containing hundreds of signatures to the planning department to stop the mast being erected just 200m from Dimple Well Infant School.
Last week the group received the news they had been waiting for when the plans were refused on the grounds that the proposal would affect the visual amenity of green belt land, and because there were already a number of existing lighting columns in the area.
Group member Claire Wilby, of Dimple Well Gardens, said: “We are absolutely ecstatic. It’s ORAMM 1, Ossett Albion 0. Everyone I have spoken to is so happy. It is great that our hard work has paid off.
“There is a chance they could appeal, but we will not back down.”
Fellow member Roger Oakland was equally pleased. He said: “Residents and schoolchildren near the proposed site have scored their first goal against Ossett Albion in their fight against having a mast so close.
“Although Albion are within their rights to appeal, let’s hope it doesn’t go that far and they now consider the many hundreds of locals who have signed the petition.”
Speaking at the time of the application, Stuart Garside, vice-chairman of the club, based at Ossett Cricket and Athletic Club, said the safe positioning of the mast had always been a priority.
He said the mobile phone company had wanted to place the mast near the entrance of the cricket club ground, which would have been even closer to the school, but he strongly objected because he wanted it to be as far away from the school and any houses as possible.
The club did not wish to comment on the news that the application had been refused until they have it in writing.
Wakefield Today. 01 July 2005
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Bardsey
Phone mast row may go to Europe
A BARDSEY couple are considering taking their battle against a controversial mobile phone mast to the European Court of Human Rights.
Chris and Geoff Nunn have been refused permission to take their landmark fight to the House of Lords but now they are getting advice about taking the matter to the European court.
The Bardsey mast was built by default by T-Mobile after Leeds City Council failed to issue planning refusal within the 56-day time limit.
A public inquiry was called but the inspector ruled that the mast was legal.
That decision was upheld in the High Court last year by Mr Justice Collins.
The couple then spent thousands of pounds proceeding with a judicial review which they had hoped would enable them to return to the Planning Inspectorate with a strong case for refusal of the Smithy Lane mast.
But in February the Court of Appeal told the Nunns there was nothing it could do to remove a planning law barrier that prevented them and fellow objectors from putting their case at a public inquiry last year.
The Nunns' lawyers had asked judges to rule that their human rights had been breached, arguing that a planning inspector's refusal to consider their case at the inquiry robbed them of a right to a fair hearing under human rights laws.
But the appeal judges said the only remedy open to the Nunns was to claim damages against Leeds City Council.
Mr and Mrs Nunn then appealed to the House of Lords but were refused.
By Sarah Kelly Wetherby News. sarah.kelly@ypn.co.uk

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Bardsley.
Phone mast GP loses appeal battle

A GP who has been fighting for three years to have a phone mast moved from near her home has been told she cannot take her case to the House of Lords.
Three law lords have refused permission for Dr Christine Nunn to challenge a Court of Appeal ruling but have not given any reasons for their decision.
The doctor, who lives in Bardsey, near Leeds, and her neighbours say the T-Mobile mast is a health hazard.
The mast was allowed because Leeds City Council bungled planning procedures.
In February, the appeal judges told the protestors the only remedy open to them was to claim damages from the council which lodged their notice of
objection one day after the statutory 56-day period had elapsed.
Property values
Dr Nunn and her neurosurgeon husband Geoff moved into the Old Vicarage in the village before the mast was built just 120 yards from their home.
Their legal battle began when the Nunns and their neighbours tried to protest at a planning inquiry that, as well as health implications, the mast would
hit property values.
But the inquiry inspector said he had no power to hear their case because Leeds City Council had failed to act within the time limit.
This prompted the Bardsey residents to take the case to the Court of Appeal and then the attempt to go to the House of Lords.
Dr Nunn said on Monday she was not surprised at the decision by the law lords and there would have been problems in paying the legal bills,
estimated at £30,000.
She added that the protestors would be meeting officers from Leeds City Council next week in the hope that the council might still be able to issue
an order that the phone mast should be taken down.
BBC News website 28.06.05

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Mast fight may go Euro

A DOCTOR from Yorkshire who says a mobile telephone mast near her home threatens her and her children's health is considering whether
to take her case to the European courts.
Earlier this week Law Lords refused permission for Christine Nunn to appeal to the House of Lords against an Appeal Court ruling in February .
For two years Dr Nunn has been trying to have removed a T-Mobile UK phone mast 120 metres from her home in the village of Bardsey, near Leeds.
Mother-of-three Dr Nunn, believes the T-Mobile mast near The Old Vicarage could trigger the migraines she and her family suffer and will have an
adverse affect on property values.
She claims the refusal of a planning inspector to consider her case – because Leeds City Council was a day late in lodging its objections
to the mast and planning permission was therefore deemed to have been given by default – has robbed her of her right to a fair hearing.
Last night she said she was considering whether to take the case to Europe and pledged to continue her fight to challenge the legislation.
Yorkshire Post. Joanne Finley29 June 2005
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Knaresborough:
Parents' fury over phone masts decision as Mast allowed near 3 schools

OUTRAGED residents say they are appalled at a decision announced yesterday which will allow the installation of a mobile phone
transmitter just yards from three Harrogate schools.
Protesters who fought tooth and nail to stop the 85ft T-Mobile mast being built say they have been let down and ignored after
High Court approval was upheld by the national Planning Inspectorate.
Campaigner, Paula Brooks, said she couldn’t believe the company was prepared to gamble on the health of young children.
“I’m devastated,” she said. ”The people in a community are not listened to.”
Cabinet Member for Planning, Coun Richard Cooper said: “The Planning Inspector has let down Harrogate Borough Council
by not supporting our decision to refuse planning permission.
He has also has let down residents living nearby and children at the schools.
I have asked Council Officers to see if there is any other way in which we can fight this proposal as the landowner.”
l Full update next Friday.
Knaresborough Today. 17 June 2005

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Harrogate:
Star psychic – I will help mast objectors

WORLD famous psychic Uri Geller has stepped in to support campaigners who are trying to stop a mobile phone mast from being built near three
Harrogate schools.
Speaking exclusively to the Harrogate Advertiser, the celebrity said he believed everything possible should be done to stop masts being built near homes
and schools and he pledged his personal support to Campus members who are fighting plans to build a 3G mast on Claro Road.
"The practice of putting mobile phone masts near schools should be outlawed and I am appalled that the Government is giving permission for such masts
to go up in areas like this," he said.
"My knowledge of the danger of masts leads me to believe that anyone living near them is endangering their lives. I believe they can cause many ailments, especially in children whose skulls are so much thinner than those of adults, and there is no doubt in my mind that these masts radiate low frequency
waves which sooner or later will damage people's health.
"I'm willing to do anything I can to help the Harrogate campaigners and protect the health and well-being of these children."
Mr Geller, who shot to fame in the 1970s when he demonstrated his ability to bend spoons using the power of his mind, was contacted by
Harrogate mast protester Jean Bowman after he appeared on a TV stitch up programme.
Programme makers pretended to build a mobile phone mast close to his home and Mr Geller, unaware that he was the subject of a prank,
reacted strongly and immediately called his lawyers.
Campus member Mrs Bowman, who has been a staunch campaigner against the Claro Road mast, saw the programme and wrote to
Uri Geller to ask for his help.
"Within a day he was on the phone to me," said Mrs Bowman.
"He told me he was convinced phone masts were a major health risk and he said he would do anything he could to help us."
Mrs Bowman, who moved her five-year-old daughter away from one of the schools affected by the mast at Christmas because of concerns
about the risks to her health, said the celebrity's involvement was a welcome boost to the campaign.
"I sometimes feel that because we are just ordinary parents our opinions will be ignored, so having someone high profile behind us is wonderful,
" she added.
The campaigners expect to hear the outcome of their latest appeal against the mast in mid June.

jenni.moulson@ypn.co.uk
20 May 2005

Orange mast: Would you like this Orange mast only 15 metres from your childrens bedrooms?
United Kingdom Created: 21 Jun 2005
Would you like this Orange mast only 15 metres from your childrens bedrooms?

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