View case history...

Mother of cancer boy fights phone mast plans United Kingdom
Contamination level: Seriously concerned, but little or no symptoms.
Author: Agnes Bennie Created: 17 Mar 2006 Updated: 17 Mar 2006 Viewed: 4810 time(s)
She fears the station would pose serious health risks to pupils and is particularly worried about the effect of radiation emissions on John, who suffers from Neurofibromentosis - a cancer that causes tumours on
This case file has 1 entry and no comments yet

"There are hundreds of kids around here everyday. What is it going to do to them?" Created: 17 Mar 2006
Mother of cancer boy fights phone mast plans

THE mother of a boy fighting cancer has launched a fight to stop a mobile phone mast being erected near three primary schools.
Agnes Bennie, 32, of Barlanark, Glasgow, says she is terrified of the effects the 39ft T-Mobile tower could have on her son John, 9, and hundreds of other young pupils in the area.
T-Mobile wants to put up the base station - which boosts mobile phone signals - in Glenduffhill Cemetery in Hallhill Road, yards from special needs school
Eastmuir Primary, and close to Barlanark and Sandaig schools .
However, Agnes has urged local people to help her fight the moves and has already got 150 neighbours backing her.
Agnes, who lives in Burnett Road and also has a daughter Cheryl, 10, found out about the plans when she received a letter from her son's school.
She fears the station would pose serious health risks to pupils and is particularly worried about the effect of radiation emissions on John, who suffers from Neurofibromentosis - a cancer that causes tumours on
yards from special needs school Eastmuir Primary, and close to Barlanark and Sandaig schools .
However, Agnes has urged local people to help her fight the moves and has already got 150 neighbours backing her.
Agnes, who lives in Burnett Road and also has a daughter Cheryl, 10, found out about the plans when she received a letter from her son's school.
She fears the station would pose serious health risks to pupils and is particularly worried about the effect of radiation emissions on John, who suffers from Neurofibromentosis - a cancer that causes tumours on his neck and requires regular radiotherapy at Yorkhill Hospital For Sick Children.
Agnes said: "I am terrified about what this station might do to John. What happens if he takes not well because of it?
"There are hundreds of kids around here everyday. What is it going to do to them?"
Agnes has left petitions in newsagents, a local supermarket and the Post Office to collect as many signatures as possible before the objection deadline of
May 14.
She added: "T-Mobile has not given parents much time to get their objections in, but I am determined to put a stop to this.
"I hope the petitions get a lot of support. I spoke to many mums at the school gate and they all feel the same way. I have 150 names on the petition already."
A spokesman for T-Mobile insisted no-one would be put at any risk by the tower and said all concerns raised by people living nearby would be considered
before the company applies for planning permission.
He said: "We are at pre-consultation stage and letters have been sent to local councillors and community councillors.
"There is a 14-day response period, but this is flexible to ensure sufficient time for local people to air their views.
"T-Mobile understands there can be concerns within local communities when locating base stations, but with more than 60million mobile phones in the UK there
is a need to develop our network to provide quality service to our customers.
"Without a network of base stations mobile phones do not work.
"Based on more than 40 years of research, T-Mobile is confident its base stations, operating within strict national and international guidelines - which are recognised by the World Health Organisation - do not present a health risk to anyone."
Lorna Caitens
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5038740.htm
No comments yet.   Click here to write a comment.