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Vodafone court defeat could open floodgate of legal rent-challenges from mast hosting landowners
United Kingdom Created: 30 Aug 2020
Mobile phone giant Vodafone has suffered a defeat in court that could open the door to a wave of legal challenges by landowners that host 5G phone masts.

Operators such as Vodafone pay landowners billions of pounds in rents every year at thousands of sites – but hoped to reduce these under the Electronic Communications Code, which was introduced in 2017.

It was designed to speed up the roll-out of 5G by cutting costs for operators hoping to install the infrastructure quickly and cheaply.

Vodafone alone spent £3.5billion in rents last year across its entire estate and tried to use the law in an early test case.

It wanted to cut its rent bill for a site owned by a Monaco-based property tycoon but lost in the County Court in Manchester.

Judge Martin Rodger QC ruled that Vodafone should pay rent to the landowner, Hanover Capital, based on the value to the operator as opposed to the value of the land itself, which would be much cheaper.

The judge said he came to his decision because four operators use the phone mast in a car park on an industrial estate outside Stockport. Vodafone estimates that only around 10 per cent of its 18,000 UK sites are shared with other operators. Although Vodafone was only hoping to slash a few thousand pounds off this particular bill, it had spent more than £300,000 fighting the case because of the significance for rents at its other phone masts across the country.

Hanover is an Isle of Man-based company owned by Mark Harrison, a property entrepreneur originally from Manchester but now based in Monaco. He also owns property investment firm Praxis. Lawyers for Harrison said the terms Vodafone was offering were 'unfair' and he decided to fight them. They said other landowners would now have a good comparison to help them negotiate a better deal.

It means thousands more landowners could now fight the company on rents.

The defeat for Vodafone comes amid calls for reforms to prevent these rows in order to speed up the installation of 5G infrastructure across the country – which is expected to provide a major economic boost. Critics of the Electronic Communications Code argue there are loopholes that mean it is not fit for purpose.

Operators joined forces last month to establish the Speed Up Britain campaign, which is chaired by the former Digital Minister Ed Vaizey. It is calling for the code to be reformed and argues the UK will fall behind in the race to cash in on the benefits of 5G.

Vaizey told The Mail on Sunday: 'This is another example of the Government's plan to give Britain the best possible mobile networks being held back by grey areas in the law. The changes we're proposing to the Electronic Communications Code can address this and help move us forward at a time when connectivity has never been more important.'

Victoria Dobson from law firm EMW said the outcome was bad for Vodafone and other operators because more landowners will now challenge them on rents.

She said: 'Growing friction between landowners and operators is definitely hindering progress on the roll-out of 5G technology.'

It is unclear whether Vodafone will appeal the outcome.

Vodafone declined to comment on the case.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Financial Mail On Sunday, Jamie Nimmo, 29 Aug 2020

Inspector throws out plans for 5G phone mast in Brighton
United Kingdom Created: 14 Aug 2020
A proposal to put up a 20-metre tall 5G phone mast has been turned down by a planning inspector.

Two mobile phone companies, Three and EE, wanted to replace a 12-metre tall mast with a 5G pole almost twice as high on the corner of Roedean Road and Marine Drive in Brighton.

They also wanted to install nine cabinets to house supporting equipment.

Brighton and Hove City Council refused the phone companies’ planning application in August last year because of its impact on the area.

The council said: “The proposal replacement monopole, by reason of its increased height and bulk, would have a significant harmful visual impact on the surrounding area and the setting of the nearby Grade II listed buildings and the South Downs National Park.

“In addition, the proposed cabinets would have a cluttered appearance that would detract from the open character of the area.”

The mobile phone companies’ agent Beacon Comms said the taller pole would have a “limited impact” on Roedean School and the national park.

But planning inspector John Woolcock backed the council’s decision.

He said: “It was apparent from my site visit that a key characteristic of the locality that contains the appeal site is its openness.

“The open space on both sides of this part of Roedean Road is an important part of the transition from the urban area into the downland landscape of the nearby South Downs National Park.

“The proposed monopole and cabinets would be considerably more prominent than the existing

telecommunications infrastructure.

“The proposal would sit uncomfortably in this context and would significantly erode the sense of

openness that prevails in this area.”

Residents sent 26 letters opposing the original plans which were turned down by officials under delegated authority.
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Source: The Argus, Sarah Booker-Lewis, 13 Aug 2020

UK Govt.: New law changes to bring better connectivity to the UK
United Kingdom Created: 6 Aug 2020
The government has today set out new law changes it will make to boost gigabit broadband rollout and bring better mobile coverage to the whole of the UK.

The move is part of the plan to give the UK the telecoms infrastructure it needs to meet the growing demands of consumers and businesses and to take advantage of future technologies that will be vital for the economy.

The telecoms regulator Ofcom will be granted new powers so it can share with the government information from broadband companies about where they plan to build gigabit-capable broadband networks, and to publish data about areas where gigabit broadband rollout is not currently planned.

These powers will help encourage the commercial rollout of gigabit broadband in locations where it is not yet earmarked. The government will also be able to take into account this information when deciding where it will spend £5 billion of funding to give the public access to the fastest broadband, capable of one gigabit per second download speeds.

This funding has been pledged to make sure hard-to-reach areas receive these much faster internet connections at the same time as towns and cities.

Separately, the government has confirmed it will push ahead with its plans to reform planning laws to make it easier for industry to share and upgrade mobile phone masts. This will speed up the rollout of 5G and improve 4G coverage in rural areas.
Matt Warman, Minister for Digital Infrastructure, said:

We’re investing billions so no part of the UK is left behind by the opportunities and economic benefits that faster, more reliable and more secure digital connectivity brings.

These changes will help target public funding in hard to reach areas most in need of better broadband. It will also help mobile companies banish rural not-spots by upgrading and sharing their masts.

European Electronic Communications Code

The government has today set out how it will bring the European Electronic Communications Code into UK law. The UK played a leading role in the negotiations for the Code, which updates the telecoms regulatory framework for the EU. A number of its provisions are influenced and inspired by existing UK objectives and best practice.

While the Code largely consists of minor changes to the existing legal framework, the government will bring in some new pro-investment measures from the Code that are in the UK’s national interest and support its plans for nationwide gigabit broadband. Other measures will give people and businesses greater consumer protection and ensure Ofcom’s regulatory powers are up to date.
They include, but are not limited to:

Network forecasting - New powers for Ofcom to gather information on operators’ planned network rollout. Ofcom will share this information with the government to allow better targeting of public investment in poorly-connected areas. It will also publish non-confidential data about where rollout is not planned to help inform industry investment.

A focus on gigabit-capable networks - A new broad duty for Ofcom to promote connectivity, access to, and take-up of gigabit-capable networks to help the UK realise its full digital potential.

Promoting cooperation and competition in hard to reach places - In areas where it is costly or difficult to install new networks, such as urban blocks of flats and rural locations, Ofcom will have the power to impose obligations on operators already present to offer network access or to share equipment such as mobile masts with other operators.

Pro-investment regulation - Ofcom’s market review period will be increased from three to five years which will give a longer period of regulatory stability to the telecoms market and more certainty for investors in gigabit broadband.

Easier switching for consumers - Currently, when switching broadband providers, consumers need to liaise with their old and their new provider and juggle the relevant old service end dates and the start dates for new services. Under these changes, they will be able to contact their new provider, who will lead and co-ordinate the switching process so it is as smooth as possible and with minimal loss of service.

Better regulation of bundles - Consumers on bundled contracts, which include mobile and broadband but also other services such as video and music streaming, will be able switch providers more easily. This means they will avoid being locked into bundled contracts if, for example, providers make changes to their contracts, or something goes wrong with just one service in the bundle.

Mobile infrastructure planning reforms

In another response to a public consultation published today, the government has announced it is taking forward proposals to simplify planning rules to speed up 5G rollout and improve rural mobile coverage.

Reforming planning laws in England will allow mobile network providers to put more equipment than they currently can on phone masts, making it easier to share masts and increase mobile coverage areas. This will help maximise the use of existing mast sites and minimise the need to build more infrastructure.

The reforms will allow:

New masts to be built taller, subject to prior approval by the planning authority, to deliver better coverage and allow more mobile operators to place equipment on them

Existing phone masts to be strengthened without prior approval, so that they can be upgraded for 5G and shared between mobile operators

Building-based masts to be placed nearer to highways to support better mobile coverage of the UK’s road networks, subject to prior approval

Cabinets containing radio equipment to be deployed alongside masts, without prior approval, to support new 5G networks

Before amending the existing legislation, the government will carry out a technical consultation on the detail of the proposals, including the appropriate environmental protections and other safeguards, and the specific limits to be put on the widths and heights of phone masts.

The government also expects the mobile phone industry to commit to further measures and assurances to ensure that the impact of new mobile deployment is minimised.
Housing Minister Rt Hon Christopher Pincher MP said:

Delivering much-needed new homes is at the heart of this Government’s mission to support people in every part of the country, and this means delivering the modern infrastructure needed to go with them.

We’re taking forward plans to extend mobile coverage, particularly for those in rural areas, so everyone can benefit from the latest technology and the jobs, opportunities and growth that comes with this.

These reforms will aid the delivery of the £1 billion deal the government made in March with the mobile network operators to build a Shared Rural Network which will mean poor mobile coverage becomes a thing of the past. It has seen the four main mobile operators undertake legally binding commitments to collectively increase mobile phone coverage throughout the UK to 95% by the end of 2025, by investing in a network of new and existing phone masts that they would all share.
ENDS
Notes to Editors:
European Electronic Communications Code:

The European Electronic Communications Code Directive revises the EU telecoms regulatory framework, which has underpinned UK telecoms law since 2003. The UK played a leading role in the negotiations for the Directive, which largely reflects UK best practice. Its core objectives are to: drive investment in very high capacity networks and services through sustainable competition; support efficient and effective use of radio spectrum; maintain the security of networks and services; and provide a high level of consumer protection.

The UK’s approach to implementation of the Directive is in line with the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement to transpose EU legislation before the end of the transition period and to provide flexibility for future domestic policy. It meets the minimum requirements of the Directive, and minimises additional costs to businesses.

The public consultation on the Code, published in July 2019, sought views on its implementation, focusing on provisions affording flexibility at the national level, including those supporting accelerated commercial roll-out of gigabit-capable and 5G networks.

Provisions where we have departed from the preferred approach outlined in the consultation represent areas where the UK legal regime is already flexible enough to cater for the specific EECC provision or a degree of discretion exists in the Directive to allow the UK (along with other EU member states) to take account of market conditions and characteristics existing in national markets.

Some articles are either already addressed by existing UK legislation, or are being transposed by Ofcom through their existing powers in the case of consumer measures, or by other Departments, such as a provision on car radio interoperability that is being transposed through Department for Transport’s Road Vehicles (Approval) Regulation legislation.

In recognition of the limited time between publication and the date when these measures will come into force and the impact of COVID-19, working with Ofcom, the government has sought to ensure that measures that directly bite upon industry including consumer protection measures will only be enforced at the appropriate time. The government is supportive of Ofcom’s statement, published on its website on 7 May, outlining that industry will be given at least 12 months to implement proposed changes to their regulatory rules allowing industry flexibility it needs during this challenging period.

Mobile infrastructure planning reforms for England:

The consultation ran for 10 weeks, from 27 August 2019, closing on 4 November 2019. Planning law is a devolved matter. These proposals and any future legislative changes apply to England only. The technical consultation will seek views on the detail of the proposals, including the appropriate environmental protections and other safeguards to mitigate the impact of new mobile infrastructure.

In developing the technical consultation, we will also work with industry and local planning authority representatives, and other government Departments and relevant regulators, including Ofcom, to strengthen the Code of Best Practice on Mobile Network Development in England

Electronic Communications Code - intention to consult on possible reforms:

The Electronic Communications Code, which is separate from the European Electronic Communications Code, is the domestic legal framework underpinning agreements between landowners and communications operators in the UK. The Code was substantially reformed in 2017 to make it cheaper and easier for electronic communications apparatus to be deployed, maintained, shared and upgraded. Now, more than ever, it is important that operators are able to do this at pace. Therefore the government intends to consult in due course on changes to the Code that may be needed to achieve this.

Click here to view the source article.
Source: Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport, Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government, 22 Jul 2020

Campaigners' anger at Bromsgrove 5G mast go ahead 'without proper consulation'
United Kingdom Created: 19 Jul 2020
A CAMPAIGNER has lambasted Bromsgrove District Council planners who given the green light for a mobile phone mast to be built on Perryfields Road without the operator seeking permission.

The 20m pole with accompanying cabinets are being installed to increase 5G coverage in the area.

But Phil Haynes said: “There are known health and safety implications which are unquestionable and for companies to be able to put up a mast without the public being able to have their say on the issue is absolutely disgraceful.

“It is an infringement of people’s civil rights which have already been eroded over the past few months.

“I fear this could be like the asbestos situation where the long-term damage was not known for years and by then it was too late.”

Dr Shirin Joseph from the Radiation Research Trust, who also commented on the plan, claimed electromagnet radiation exposure (EMR) was dangerous to children, even within the recognised International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) levels.

He said the site was 100m from a nursery and close to a school, adding no meaningful consultation with local residents could be organised because of the pandemic.

Ruth Bamford, head of planning and regeneration, confirmed the decision on Tuesday and said it was not possible to question the principle of the development or resist it on inappropriate or greenbelt issues.

She said as the proposed installation met all the ICNIRP exposure standards, she considered it was acceptable on the public health grounds.

And she added the applicants had justified the proposed location which had been chosen as there was no viable alternative.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Bromsgrove Standard, Tristan Harris, 16 ul 2020

Huawei to be removed from UK 5G networks by 2027
United Kingdom Created: 19 Jul 2020
"Protecting the UK’s telecoms sector has always been the government’s top priority".

Decision follows a technical review by the National Cyber Security Centre in response to US sanctions.

HUAWEI will be completely removed from the UK’s 5G networks by the end of 2027, the government has announced, following new advice produced by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) on the impact of US sanctions against the telecommunications vendor.

Ahead of this there will be a total ban on the purchase of any new 5G kit after 31 December 2020.

The decision was taken today in a meeting of the National Security Council (NSC) chaired by the Prime Minister, in response to new US sanctions. These were imposed on Huawei in May, after the UK’s initial decision on high risk vendors, and are the first of their kind removing the firm’s access to products which have been built based on US semiconductor technology.

Technical experts at the NCSC reviewed the consequences of the sanctions and concluded the company will need to do a major reconfiguration of its supply chain as it will no longer have access to the technology on which it currently relies and there are no alternatives which we have sufficient confidence in. They found the new restrictions make it impossible to continue to guarantee the security of Huawei equipment in the future.

As a result, ministers today agreed that UK operators should stop the purchase of Huawei equipment affected by the sanctions. There will be a ban on the purchase of new Huawei kit for 5G from next year and it will be completely removed from 5G networks by the end of 2027.

The decision takes into account our specific national circumstances and how the risks from these sanctions are manifested in the UK.

The existing restrictions on Huawei in sensitive and critical parts of the network remain in place.

The US action also affects Huawei products used in the UK’s full fibre broadband networks. However, the UK has managed Huawei’s presence in the UK’s fixed access networks since 2005 and we also need to avoid a situation where broadband operators are reliant on a single supplier for their equipment. As a result, following security advice from our world leading experts, we are advising full fibre operators to transition away from purchasing new Huawei equipment. A technical consultation will determine the transition timetable, but we expect this period to last no longer than two years.

This approach strikes the right balance by recognising full fibre’s established presence and supporting the connections that the public relies on, while fully addressing the security concerns of our world leading experts.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden said:

5G will be transformative for our country, but only if we have confidence in the security and resilience of the infrastructure it is built upon.

Following US sanctions against Huawei and updated technical advice from our cyber experts, the government has decided it is necessary to ban Huawei from our 5G networks.

No new kit is to be added from January 2021, and UK 5G networks will be Huawei free by the end of 2027. This decisive move provides the industry with the clarity and certainty it needs to get on with delivering 5G across the UK.

By the time of the next election we will have implemented in law an irreversible path for the complete removal of Huawei equipment from our 5G networks.

The government will now seek to legislate at the earliest opportunity with a new Telecoms Security Bill to put in place the powers necessary to implement this tough new telecoms security framework.

It will give the government the national security powers to impose these new controls on high risk vendors and create extensive security duties on network operators to drive up standards.

FURTHER BACKGROUND

Protecting the UK’s telecoms sector has always been the government’s top priority and last July, through the Telecoms Security Review, it announced one of the toughest regimes in the world for telecoms security. It will require all operators to raise security standards, to combat the range of threats, whether from cyber criminals or state sponsored attacks.

In January, as it concluded The Review, the government concluded ‘high risk’ vendors should be excluded from the core and most sensitive parts of the UK’s 5G network, restricted to up to a 35 per cent market share in the access network, which connects devices and equipment to mobile phone masts, by 2023, with the decisions kept under review. Our word-leading cyber security experts were satisfied that with our approach and tough regulatory regime, any risk can be safely managed, but were also clear that further sanctions could require them to change that assessment.

The policy in relation to high risk vendors has not been designed around one company, one country or one threat. It is intended to be an enduring and flexible policy that will enable us to manage the risks to the network both now and in the future.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: GOV.UK, Press release, 14 Jul 2020

New 20m Three 5G mast cannot be built on grassy land as planned, Bolton Council rules
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jun 2020
A NEW 5G mast would be a “wholly incongruous” and “dominant” feature in the neighbourhood, planners have ruled as an application for a 20-metre phone mast in Great Lever has been thrown out by the local authority.

Planning permission for a telecommunications monopole on the grassy land in Green Lane, known locally as “bus island”, has been refused by Bolton Council.

Mobile network operator Hutchinson 3G UK, commonly known as Three, is in the process of selecting sites for new phone masts in the Bolton area and has submitted a series of applications for different locations across the borough.

But planning officers ruled that this 20-metre mast and base cabinet would appear as a “wholly incongruous” and “dominant” feature that would be harmful to the residential setting and out of scale with its surroundings.

Speaking in April, Andy Brabin, who lives nearby described the proposed mast, which would be twice the height of adjacent properties, as a “visual intrusion”.

As a boy, the Boscobel Road resident used to sell copies of the Bolton Evening News from the selected spot in Green Lane which used to be a bus terminus.

Mr Brabin has now welcomed the “sensible” decision by Bolton Council to refuse planning permission for prior approval of the mast.

He said: “This mast would have been totally out of place and have a negative impact on the amenity of the area.

“I recognise that these masts are needed but to place it in such a prominent position in the heart of a residential area is not appropriate.”

Applications for 20-metre telecommunication monopoles have been submitted to Bolton Council for sites in Chorley New Road near a Texaco garage in Horwich and in Deane Church Lane, next to ASDA in Daubhill.

WHP Telecoms Ltd has also written to councillors in Kearsley on behalf of Three inviting them to enter discussions before it submits plans for a mast in front of Kearsley Mount Shopping Precinct in Manchester Road.

Planning consultant Damian Hosker, submitted the application for the mast in Green Lane, Great Lever to Bolton Council on behalf of Three on April 1.

In a letter to the local authority, he said: “The location has been identified as being necessary for H3G Ltd business development and meets its specific technical and operational requirements.

“The identification of this location follows pre-application discussion with your department and we now make a formal application to you as planning authority.”

The applicant has six months to appeal the decision by Bolton Council.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: The Bolton News, Joseph Timan, 30 May 2020

Three 5G mast rejected as council says plans would harm regeneration
United Kingdom Created: 5 Jun 2020
Plans for a 20 metre tall 5G mast in Merseyside have been rejected over fears it would harm a local regeneration effort.

The mast, which would have been built just off Conway Street in Birkenhead, Wirral, was said to be "unsightly" and "detrimental" to the character of the local area due to its scale by Wirral Council.

The local authority was also concerned the mast would harm huge plans to regenerate Birkenhead, due to its size and “prominent location” within the regeneration site.

5G has been a controversial topic of late, with campaigners who oppose the technology promoting conspiracy theories linking it to coronavirus without any evidence.

Earlier this week a 5G mast in Mossley Hill, Liverpool, was destroyed in a fire and a video showing another 5G mast on fire in the city was shared on social media last month. Plans for a 20 metre tall 5G mast in Merseyside have been rejected over fears it would harm a local regeneration effort.

The mast, which would have been built just off Conway Street in Birkenhead, Wirral, was said to be "unsightly" and "detrimental" to the character of the local area due to its scale by Wirral Council.

The local authority was also concerned the mast would harm huge plans to regenerate Birkenhead, due to its size and “prominent location” within the regeneration site.

5G has been a controversial topic of late, with campaigners who oppose the technology promoting conspiracy theories linking it to coronavirus without any evidence.

Earlier this week a 5G mast in Mossley Hill, Liverpool, was destroyed in a fire and a video showing another 5G mast on fire in the city was shared on social media last month.

Shortly before that incident, Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson blasted 5G conspiracy theories as “bizarre” and added: "How can anyone contemplate relating putting a 5G mast up in Liverpool causes coronavirus?

“The very idea that Covid-19 was created by 5G is patently nonsense.”

Scientists and other officials, including the World Health Organisation have debunked the 5G Covid-19 theory, stating it is not possible for the virus to be transmitted by electomagnetic radiation.

Three, the company behind this plan, said the new mast in Birkenhead was needed to deliver an “essential” improvement in 5G connectivity in the area.

Explaining the choice of location, Three’s planning documents stated: “Mobile phone base stations operate on a low power and accordingly base stations therefore need to be located in the areas they are required to serve.

“Increasingly, people are also using their mobiles in their homes and this means we need to position base stations in, or close to, residential areas.”

The document also stated that while the planned height of the mast was 20 metres, this has been “kept down to the absolute minimum capable of providing the required essential new 5G coverage”.

It was not possible to simply upgrade an existing mast site to accommodate the 5G mast, because higher radio frequencies used for 5G do not travel as far as those frequencies currently in use and sometimes existing sites do not have the capacity to be upgraded.

To deliver the higher frequency Three said there was an “acute need” for a new mast.

The proposal was rejected for reasons of appearance.

On this, Three’s document said: “The proposed works on this existing site would qualify as a visual change to the area, but are necessary to ensure improved delivery of service [and] would respect and continue to maintain the appearance of the area.”

Three insisted that the plan “would not result in demonstrable harm to the character of the immediate or wider area”.

But Wirral Council disagreed.

The local authority’s letter of rejection, read: “The proposed mast and associated equipment will appear as unsightly features in a prominent location and would therefore, by reason of its scale and siting, have a detrimental and adverse impact upon the character and appearance of the surrounding area.”

The plan’s potential impact on efforts to regenerate Birkenhead was also given as a reason for rejection by the council.

Wirral Council’s letter added: “The proposed mast would be an unsightly feature within an extremely prominent location at the heart of the Birkenhead Town Centre regeneration site, and this would undermine the significantly advanced regeneration plans for this area.”

A spokesperson for Three said: “ 5G rollout is vital for residents and business of Wirral. We want to offer the local area a great network experience and our planners determined that a new site was required to deliver it. We will work with the council to find a way forwards.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Liverpool Echo, George Morgan, 29 May 2020

URGENT: 5G Judicial Review 2020 - 15 days to reach £50,000 (£38,514 pledged already).
United Kingdom Created: 20 May 2020
I am a solicitor - I became involved in understanding the harmful health impact of 5G when a member of my community alerted me to an application to put a mast on the building opposite her apartment.

This page is against wireless 5G, radiofrequency radiation (“RFR”) and electromagnetic fields (“EMFs”) generally due to their impact on the health of humans, animals and plants.

Many people are sensitive to RFR and EMFs and suffer illness, distress and financial loss due to inability to work. The balance of scientific evidence is now clear that RFR/EMFs are harmful to humans.

The UK government insist on using ICNIRP’s guidelines to set limits of radiation for public health. ICNIRP’s guidelines are not fit for purpose as, among other things, they only recognise harm from heating of the body and are set for short term exposure – 6 minutes in fact. Many people suffer harm without any heating of their bodies.

5G is the fifth generation of RFR technology used in the mobile telecoms industry and follows 1G – 4G. It dwarfs RFR from 1G – 4G because millions more masts, antennae, small cells, picocells etc have to be placed at short distances apart all around the country in order to develop the infrastructure to deliver the data speed promised by 5G.

The current electrosmog from 1G – 4G will become significantly worse and it is likely to result in more harm to humans, animals, trees and pollinators.

Many people have tried to engage with the government and its agencies, including Public Health England, over the last few years in an attempt to persuade them that their existing policies are harmful to human, animal and plant health. The government rejects such approaches and insists on its adherence to ICNIRP’s guidelines. It has removed health concerns from the National Planning Policy Framework, thereby removing the ability of its citizens from raising such concerns at local council level. Its Electronic Communications Code has limited the rights of its citizens to object to equipment being put on their land. It has permitted the proliferation of RFR gadgets used by babies and children without constraint.

*SNIP* read the complete text at the source link below...

Click here to view the source article.
Source: CrowdJustice, Jessica Learmond-Criqui, 17 May 2020

UK Legal action against 5G
United Kingdom Created: 10 May 2020
We are groups of individuals nationwide, including doctors, scientists and engineers, supported by a strong team of lawyers headed by Michael Mansfield QC, who have joined forces to commence legal proceedings to challenge the UK government’s failure to take sufficient notice of clearly identified health and safety risks of wireless radiation and the increased exposure from the deployment of 5G.

The risks are foreseeable and preventable, current standards are not fit for purpose and obsolete. The case concerns defending our fundamental right to privacy and protection from experimentation.

*SNIP* Visit the website, here: https://actionagainst5g.org/
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Action Against 5G, 10 May 2020

If all roofs were developed as ‘green’ what would happen with the phone masts?
United Kingdom Created: 9 May 2020
I WRITE in support of the tenants and residents of Haddo House, who are currently living with the threat of having mobile phone masts placed on the roof of their Camden Council owned block.

In several similar cases, namely Chester Court, Lissenden Gardens, Winifred Paul House and Monmouth House, such plans were ditched after meeting very strong opposition.

In the case of Monmouth, the mobile phone masts that were planned for our roof eventually appeared on the roof of a commercial premises just past the main entrance to Regis Road industrial estate on a building that has the words Kentish Town written on its side in large graffiti.

If you took mobile phone mast law at face value, it would tell you that the mobile phone firms can choose to put their masts on any roof, whether the property owner likes it or not, unless the owner has the intention to develop their roof.

I still maintain Camden could end all threat of mobile phone masts being placed on its residential buildings by proving that its green credentials are more than just talk through implementing a programme of developing all its roofs as green roofs.

That said, if the opposition is strong enough, these firms will find an alternative site on a non-residential building.

I would urge any TRA that is under threat from having such masts placed on their roofs to read the many letters written by myself and others on this whole subject in recent months in the CNJ Letters section.

The dates and letters are as follows: in 2019 (Act now on mobile phone masts, May 2), (Are we living amid danger that we don’t understand? May 9), (New dangers with the roll-out of 5G, May 16) and (concerned), (Why the silence on mobile phone masts? May 30), (Waves are worrying, June 6), (Phone masts questions, July 4), (Stop these phone masts, July 11), (Signals safety first, please, August 1), (Danger signals for the 5G roll-out, August 8), (Scrap digital rooftops programme, September 19), (Scrap the 5G programme, October 10), (5G safety is not assured, October 31), and, on January 9 2020, Never mind phone masts, let’s green our rooftops.

LOUIS LOIZOU
Raglan Street, NW5
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Camden New Journal, LOUIS LOIZOU, 08 May 2020

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