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Radiation from smartphones could trigger memory loss in teenagers, new study reveals (2018)
United Kingdom Created: 3 Dec 2019
Smartphone radiation could be destroying the memory performance of a new generation of adolescents, a troubling new study has warned.

Cumulative exposure to mobile devices over the course of a year negatively affects the figural memory of adolescents, scientists found.

Figural memory is mainly located in the right hemisphere of the brain and refers to our ability to make sense of objects including images, patterns and shapes.

Youngsters who hold their phone next to their right ear are the most affected by exposure to radiation.

However, sending text messages, playing mobile games, and browsing the internet may also have negative effects, albeit not as pronounced, the study showed.

Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) studied nearly 700 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 in Switzerland.

They looked at the link between their daily exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) and their memory performance.

The effects of RF-EMF were more pronounced in adolescents using the mobile phone on the right side of the head, the study revealed.

'This may suggest that indeed RF-EMF absorbed by the brain is responsible for the observed associations', said Martin Röösli, Head of Environmental Exposures and Health at Swiss TPH.

Other aspects of wireless communication use, such as sending texts, playing games or browsing the Internet will also cause marginal RF-EMF exposure.

However, these were not associated with the negative development of memory.

Participants had to complete a paper questionnaire that assessed their mobile phone and media usage, as well as their psychological and physical health.

Immediately afterwards they did computerised cognitive tests.

Participants carried a portable measurement device called an exposimeter with an integrated GPS for three consecutive days.

At the same time a time-activity app on a smartphone in flight mode was filled in.

This meant that scientists could link the RF-EMF records to a particular activity or place.

'Changes in figural memory score were negatively correlated with cordless phone calls and, in tendency, with the duration of mobile phone calls and the cumulative RF-EMF brain dose', researchers found.

Dr Röösli emphasised that further research is needed to rule out the influence of other factors.

'For instance, the study results could have been affected by puberty, which affects both mobile phone use and the participant's cognitive and behavioural state.'

The potential effect of RF-EMF exposure to the brain is a relatively new field of scientific inquiry, according to the paper published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

'It is not yet clear how RF-EMF could potentially affect brain processes or how relevant our findings are in the long-term', said Dr Röösli.

'Potential risks to the brain can be minimised by using headphones or the loud speaker while calling, in particular when network quality is low and the mobile phone is functioning at maximum power.'

In 2016 it was revealed that RF-EMF can cause a pain response in amputees.

Researchers claimed to have scientific evidence to support the anecdotal reports made by people with amputated limbs.

The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE , found that in rats with an amputation-like injury the animals showed clear evidence of pain in the presence of the signals.

Dr Mario Romero-Ortega, senior author of the study and an associate professor at the University of Texas at Dallas, said: 'Our study provides evidence, for the first time, that subjects exposed to cellphone towers at low, regular levels can actually perceive pain.'

'Our study also points to a specific nerve pathway that may contribute to our main finding.'

The rats were exposed to EMF signals equivalent to standing near a mobile phone tower almost 131ft (40 metres) away.

Animals received exposure for ten minutes, once a week for eight weeks.

They found that after four weeks, 88 per cent of rats with the nerve injury showed a definite pain response to the signal.

'Many believe that a neuroma has to be present in order to evoke pain. Our model found that electromagnetic fields evoked pain that is perceived before neuroma formation; subjects felt pain almost immediately,' explained Dr Romero-Ortega.

'My hope is that this study will highlight the importance of developing clinical options to prevent neuromas, instead of the current partially effective surgery alternatives for neuroma resection to treat pain', he said.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Daily Mail, Phoebe Weston, 20 Jul 2018

Woman who fears phone mast radiation is making her ill sleeps in foil covered tent
United Kingdom Created: 17 Nov 2019
The 46-year-old woman said she has started sleeping under a space blanket and foil tent in her Leicester flat because of the EE and O2 phone masts above her flat.

A concerned tenant has claimed that radiation from phone masts above the roof of her flat have made her ill.

The 46-year-old woman has now resorted to sleeping under a space blanket in an aluminium foil covered tent to minimise her symptoms.

The woman, who does not wish to be named, told LeicestershireLive that her symptoms include anaemia, and pains in her stomach and chest, which she believes are linked to radiation from the masts.

Phone operators O2 and EE say they operate mobile networks safely, and research by the World Health Organisation, found that no health risks have been established from low-level radio signals.

The woman, who has lived in her home in Evington, Leicester, for four years, said she started sleeping in a tent after she began waking up from intense stomach pains.

She said: "I started experiencing low moods, low energy and different aches and pains about a year ago.

“My own diagnosis from my doctor began primarily as having vitamin D3 and vitamin B12 deficiencies, anaemia, abnormal red bloods, increased auto-immune cells, oxidative stress, rheumatoid arthritis type symptoms, digestive and metabolic issues, thyroiditis type symptoms, lack of energy, tiredness, increased nerve pain.

“The symptoms were ultimately summarised as fibromyalgia by my doctor.

“I also put on three stone in weight out of nowhere.

“These symptoms all appeared out of nowhere when I am normally a fit and healthy person.”

She also said her partner moved out of her flat when he also began to experience the same symptoms.

She added: “After doing research and consulting further with my doctor, I concluded that it was most likely that the radiation from the phone masts had had an accumulative effect as a result of long-term exposure and affected my cell metabolism and cause oxidative stress leading to the variety of symptoms.”

“I have discussed this with both my doctor and also various other medical staff and experts who have all concluded that this is the likely cause of my current health issues.

She is now hoping to move out of her flat, Carrick Point, when she starts a new job.

A planning application to replace the existing six masts with a 7.5 metre tower supporting 12 new masts was recently refused by Leicester City Centre, much to the woman's relief.

Planning officers said the development would be "detrimental" to the architectural interest and landmark quality of the heritage asset.

An O2 spokesperson told LeicestershireLive: “We take the safety of our customers and the public very seriously, and operate our mobile network safely, within the limits set by international standards.”

An EE spokesperson said: ”Research into the safety of radio signals has been conducted for more than 50 years.

"The strong consensus of the public health agencies around the world, such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), is that no health risks have been established from exposure to the low-level radio signals used for Wi-Fi and mobile communications.

“In line with advice from WHO, the UK Government has adopted the exposure limits developed by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) who monitor all new research.

"All UK mobile network providers build their networks within these guidelines.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: MIrror, Amy Orton, 16 Nov 2019

Could Bristol councillors end the roll-out of 5G in Bristol?
United Kingdom Created: 3 Nov 2019
Campaigners are calling for Bristol City Council to switch off the network over radiation fears.

A debate urging council chiefs to stop the roll-out of 5G in Bristol is set to take place at City Hall next week.

The service, which allows faster phone data speeds, has been operational in the city since July 3 on the Vodafone network.

But campaigners are calling for Bristol City Council to switch off the network over radiation fears.

Montpelier nutritional therapist Sally Beare launched a petition earlier this year urging the authority to follow Geneva and Florence in adopting “the precautionary principle”, halting 5G until there is more information to show it is safe.

Nearly 4,000 people have added their names to the petition which is enough to trigger a special debate in the council chamber which is set for Tuesday (September 10).

Ms Beare said she first became passionate about the issue when she happened across a statement made by Washington State University’s Dr Martin Pall.

Dr Pall describes the introduction of 5G as “the stupidest idea anyone has had in the history of the world”.

He says it risks cancer because “an extraordinary number of antennae are required, high outputs are needed for penetration, pulsation levels will be very high, and it will have an impact on the human body’s cellular electrical field”.

Public Health England (PHE) says it does not expect 5G to impact on people’s health.

But Ms Breare is not convinced and says it is “not scaremongering to say that 5G will cause illness and death”.

She added: “It is clear from the independent science that parents will lose children and children will lose parents.

“It is an outdated myth that non-ionising radiation is safe; it is not.

“Microwave radiation from existing mobile networks has been found in thousands of peer-reviewed studies to cause harm to health, including neurological effects, nervous system issues and cancer.

“Several recent large-scale studies have shown that mobile radiation causes fatal brain and heart cancer; a proper look at the data also shows that brain gliomas in England - the type associated with mobile radiation - have doubled in the last twenty years.

“Some of the most powerful and progressive cities in the world, such as Brussels and parts of Geneva, have banned 5G for health reasons.

“Bristol should be looking to them and to the experts in human radiation effects, and not to our fractured, insecure government, for guidance.”

A separate petition against 5G, signed by 235 scientists and doctors across the world, warns the network will "massively increase" people's exposure to mobile phone radiation they say could cause cancer.

But Head of radiation dosimetry at Public Health England (PHE), Simon Mann, said: “It is possible that there may be a small increase in overall exposure to radio waves when 5G is added to an existing telecommunications network or in a new area.

“However, the overall exposure is expected to remain low relative to guidelines and as such there should be no consequences for public health.”

A PHE spokesman added the body is committed to making sure 5G radio waves comply with International Committee on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines.

He said PHE will update its advice “should new evidence dictate that is necessary”.

A Vodafone spokesperson said: “The radio frequencies used for 5G in the UK are similar to the ones currently used for 4G services. Where 4G uses frequencies between 800 MHz and 2.6GHz, 5G uses frequencies between 3.4GHz and 3.6GHz.”

Click here to view the source article.
Source: Bristol Live, Kate Wilson, 05 Sep 2019

Burnham-On-Sea town councillors raise concerns over 5G phone masts plans
United Kingdom Created: 27 Oct 2019
Burnham-On-Sea and Highbridge town councillors have objected against plans to make it easier for phone companies to install 5G phone masts.

The National Association of Local Councils (NALC) has voiced strong opposition to plans by the UK government proposing to simplify the planning rules – called Permitted Development Rights – for new mobile infrastructure such as 4G and 5G masts in order to improve rural network coverage across England.

Members of the Town Council’s Planning Applications Committee have considered the proposed removal of planning restrictions on the 5G mobile network at their latest meeting – and agreed with the NALC position.

Burnham and Highbridge Town Council says: “The view of the committee was that new mast installations and/or changes to existing mast installations should be subject to the usual planning process to enable public scrutiny and to ensure installations are sympathetic to the surrounding environment as far as possible.”

“The purpose of the planning process is not to prevent developments but to ensure they are carried out to an acceptable standard.”

“It was agreed to support NALC’s comments in regard to new-build houses and business to be provided with in-built infrastructure to enable connection to fibre-optic broadband and support the Rural Coalition’s call for infrastructure which reaches rural areas, so the rural economy can grow and create quality jobs.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Burnham-on-sea.com, 23 Oct 2019

Win for anti-5G group as mast plans rejected
United Kingdom Created: 16 Oct 2019
PLANS for three superfast mobile internet masts have been scuppered – and anti-5G campaigners are hailing it “a triumph”.

The 20-metre 5G masts were set to be installed in Brighton near Hove Park, Arundel Street, and the junction of Roedean Road and Marine Drive, Brighton.

But Brighton and Hove City Council has refused planning permission, saying the masts would create “visual clutter” and harm the character of the area.

Campaigners from the group Brighton and Hove 5G Radiation Free have been railing against the masts for months.

They feared they would contribute to a “damaging electromagnetic soup” and that radio wave emissions could harm people’s nervous systems, cause cancer and reduce fertility.

Research by the NHS, Public Health England, and the World Health Organisation shows mobile phone signals are safe. But the campaigners believe the research is out of date and regard the refusal of planning permission as a major victory for the city.

Campaigner Fiona Philips said: “It shows there are ways of stopping this through council planning laws.

“There have been hundreds of complaints, objections and concerns – maybe council officials took notice.

“We’ve been told that telecoms companies do have the right of appeal, and they often exercise it, so we need to keep up the pressure.

“These masts are in everybody’s back yard.

“And it’s not just 5G.

“What a lot of people don’t realise is that this technology is an enabler for a smart future where there will be driverless cars, smart homes and cities, and millions of microchips everywhere from bottle tops to fridges, all connecting up to 5G.

“Even the Prime Minister is worried.

“Earlier this month he warned the UN of a ‘great cloud of data that looms ever more oppressively over the human race’.

“He said it was ‘a giant dark thundercloud waiting to burst.’ That’s what it will be like.”

The campaigners explain their concerns using a chart showing the frequency of electromagnetic waves, from low-frequency radio waves to high-energy gamma rays.

It shows 5G frequency is below visible light but higher than microwaves – which the group considers to be around the threshold for human safety.

This summer, demonstrators voiced concerns about children at nearby private schools, who they said were not protected by regulations that prohibit masts within a certain radius of state schools.

They were also concerned about ecological damage.

One campaigner said: “This is having a terrible effect on wildlife.

“They told us the 5G waves are safe because there’s only a 2mm penetration. But if you’re an ant, that’s it.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: The Argus, Charlotte Ikonen, 14 Oct 2019

Council bosses argue against Government's 5G mast planning proposals
United Kingdom Created: 16 Oct 2019
COUNCIL bosses urged the Government to protect local communities as the rollout of 5G continues.

As part of a Government consultation, Blackburn with Darwen Council officials have voiced concern that local planning authorities are seeing their powers reduced.

The Government is proposing to amend the permitted development rights in England to grant planning permission for mobile infrastructure to support deployment of 5G and extend mobile coverage particularly in rural areas.

Related news:
Oct 2019, United Kingdom: UK Govt. proposes to remove all council powers to reject telecoms masts

In order to deploy 5G and improve coverage in areas with poor connections, mobile network operators will need to strengthen existing sites to accommodate additional equipment, and also identify and develop new sites.

These development usually require planning permission, either through a planning application submitted to the local authority or by Government granting it by using permitted development rights.

Now mobile network operators have identified to the Government that to provide greater mobile coverage and to support the deployment of 5G this would need taller and wider masts, building based masts located nearer to highways, and faster deployment of radio equipment housing located on both protected and unprotected land.

The Government is now considering further reforms to the planning system in England in order to support the network upgrades that will be required to deploy 5G and to extend network coverage, particularly in rural areas.

But council bosses say while the technology is vital, control over permission should remain with local authorities.

Director of growth and development, Martin Kelly, said: “Blackburn With Darwen Borough Council understands that rural communities are keen to obtain levels of digital connectivity such as fast broadband and good mobile ‘phone signals in order to support both work and leisure.

“Such technology is essential not only for our rural communities to remain vital and viable into the future but also to ensure that the emergency services, including Mountain Rescue, can continue to operate effectively across the borough.

“It is considered that the Consultation is very much operator led and appears to be removing further controls from the planning regime, which will lead to local planning authorities having reduced powers to protect their local communities.

“The requirement for new taller communications masts will have to strike a balance between the landscape and better connectivity and respect certain protected areas, in particular here in Blackburn With Darwen Borough, the SSSI site in the south of the borough, Country Heritage Sites, which contain significant ecological/biodiversity attributes, and the conservation areas.

“It is crucial that if the Government are to push ahead with the larger masts that they must accommodate more equipment, potentially reducing the number of masts required overall, and the design including materials of these structures are important issues to consider.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Lancashire Telegraph, Jonathan Grieve, 13 Ocrt 2019

UK Govt. proposes to remove all council powers to reject telecoms masts
United Kingdom Created: 11 Oct 2019
A ‘monster’ mobile phone mast is set to be installed at a busy road junction in Sutton Coldfield, if applications from EE and Three are given the go-ahead.

Via the joint venture company between EE and Three called, MBNL, they have applied for permission to install a ‘phase 7 monopole’ at the junction of Sutton Oak Road and Chester Road North.

The mast would stand at 20 metres, which is almost double the height of the existing installation.
“Totally unacceptable”

Sutton Vesey councillor, Rob Pocock, has spoken out about both his and the resident’s concerns surrounding the new mast: “This monster mast is totally unacceptable for this local area,” wrote Pocock, in an open letter.

He went on to say that, “it is out of character for the area, destructive of the attractive local amenity, and a dangerous distraction for drivers using this busy junction."

However, in the application document, MBNL defended the mast by explaining that, “the next generation of mobile telephony is 5G and it brings a revolutionary speech to managing spectrum and greatly increased data speeds. The advantages this presents range from near-instant downloads of HD films to connected cars, smart medical devices and smart cities.”

The document went on to say: “Although 5G will undoubtedly bring new opportunities and huge benefits to society, we cannot escape from the requirement that new structures, antennas and ancillary equipment will be needed.”

Embracing 5G?

Whilst 5G will provide much faster connectivity and allow for new technology, it seems that many councils aren’t best pleased. The 5G roll-out has already been criticized by councils, which have limited legal powers to reject phone mast applications.

And in a move that may anger councils even further, the government has just launched a national proposal that would remove the power to reject these new constructions from the council entirely.

This would result in companies no longer needing to apply for planning permission, and they would be granted a blanket ‘permitted development right’. But this would make sense, because as the 5G roll-out begins to gain momentum, new phone masts will have to be built in many locations.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: 5G Radar, Fiona Leake, 07 Oct 2019

Ban on mobile phone masts in Solihull set to end
United Kingdom Created: 17 Sep 2019
A stance that the council took in the 1990s - amid fears about whether the technology posed a health risk - could be dropped, with a national drive to improve 5G coverage.

A long-standing ban on installing mobile phone masts on council-owned land and buildings in Solihull looks set to end.

For more than 20 years the local authority has followed a policy laid out when there was greater concern about the possible health risks of electronic communications equipment.

In 1992, councillors had agreed to refuse future requests to erect microwave dishes on its property and, five years later, two applications to install radio antennae were dismissed - setting a further precedent.

While telecoms giants have been able to use "statutory powers" to override the council stance when it comes to highways, the policy has effectively remained in place elsewhere.

But a new report suggests Solihull will need to "review" its historic position in response to the government's drive to increase 5G coverage, with town halls being urged to remove obstacles facing operators.

Failing to do would go against the nationwide Electronic Communications Code, recently updated, and leave the local authority open to a legal challenge from companies, it has been suggested.

Although any application would still need to go through the standard planning process.

Council officer Martin Clayton said: "The explicit aim of the reforms, which are embodied in the ‘barrier busting’ measures recommended by both government and WMCA [West Midlands Combined Authority], is to make it easier and more cost effective for network providers to deploy and maintain digital infrastructure."

The decisions taken in the 1990s came at a time when there was widespread uncertainty about the possible impact that the technology could have on people's health.

In his report, Mr Clayton has said that scientific research over the last two decades has considered these fears.

Advice quoted on Public Health England's website said: "Independent expert groups in the UK and at international level have examined the accumulated body of research evidence.

"Their conclusions support the view that health effects are unlikely to occur if exposures are below international guideline levels."

Although a recent row over a mast installed in Yardley Wood Road, Solihull Lodge, proves the issue still has power to cause controversy.

Proposals to review the "moratorium" adopted in the 1990s will be discussed at tonight's (Monday's) meeting of the resources and delivering value scrutiny board.

The issue will then be considered by the council's cabinet at its next meeting on October 10.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Birmingham Live, David Irwin, 16 Sep 2019

Consultation on new permitted development rights for telecomms apparatus
United Kingdom Created: 13 Sep 2019
Recently, the government announced a consultation on proposals to reform permitted development rights (PD rights) for operators under the Electronic Communications Code (Code Operators). The aim of the proposals is to support 5G technology and extend mobile coverage. Four new PD rights are proposed, two of which would require prior approval from the local planning authority (LPA), two of which would not. Bearing in mind the infrastructure that will be needed for greater mobile coverage and to get ready for 5G, and considering the potential impact on them of the proposed rights, landowners and developers should consider taking the opportunity to respond to the consultation.

The PD rights proposed are to enable the deployment of radio housing equipment on land (apart from on Sites of Scientific Interest) and the strengthening of existing masts for 5G upgrades and mast sharing. These rights would not require “prior approval” from the LPA, which means that the LPA would not need to be notified before the rights are implemented by Code Operators and will not therefore have an opportunity to take into account the interests of other parties such as landowners, occupiers or neighbours. PD rights are also proposed for the deployment of “building-based” masts nearer to highways, and higher masts for for better mobile coverage and mast sharing, although both of these rights would require prior approval.

A recent decision reminds landowners that they can face a tough test when trying to resist the imposition of Electronic Communications Code rights in favour of operators. In EE Ltd v Chichester [2019] UKUT 164, where a landowner tried to resist the imposition of the Code by a mobile phone network operator by claiming that they wanted to redevelop the land on which a mast stood, the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) confirmed that a landowner had to demonstrate “both that they have a reasonable prospect of being able to carry out their redevelopment project and that they have a firm, settled and unconditional intention to do so”. Landowners will have even less control over their land if the proposed PD rights are progressed. However, some comfort may be gained from another recent decision, Mawbey v Cornerstone Telecommunications Infrastructure [2019] EWCA Civ 1016, where the Court of Appeal discussed whether or not a central support pole was a “radio mast” – in this case, it was decided that such poles were indeed masts and that they therefore did not have the benefit of PD rights.

The government says that they will consider responses to this consultation and that another consultation on more detailed proposals wil be held in due course.
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Herbert Smith Freehills LLP, Fiona Sawyer & Mathew White, 11 Sep 2019

Could Bristol councillors end the roll-out of 5G in Bristol?
United Kingdom Created: 12 Sep 2019
Campaigners are calling for Bristol City Council to switch off the network over radiation fears.

A debate urging council chiefs to stop the roll-out of 5G in Bristol is set to take place at City Hall next week.

The service, which allows faster phone data speeds, has been operational in the city since July 3 on the Vodafone network.

But campaigners are calling for Bristol City Council to switch off the network over radiation fears.

Montpelier nutritional therapist Sally Beare launched a petition earlier this year urging the authority to follow Geneva and Florence in adopting “the precautionary principle”, halting 5G until there is more information to show it is safe.

Nearly 4,000 people have added their names to the petition which is enough to trigger a special debate in the council chamber which is set for Tuesday (September 10).

Ms Beare said she first became passionate about the issue when she happened across a statement made by Washington State University’s Dr Martin Pall.

Dr Pall describes the introduction of 5G as “the stupidest idea anyone has had in the history of the world”.

He says it risks cancer because “an extraordinary number of antennae are required, high outputs are needed for penetration, pulsation levels will be very high, and it will have an impact on the human body’s cellular electrical field”.

Public Health England (PHE) says it does not expect 5G to impact on people’s health.

But Ms Breare is not convinced and says it is “not scaremongering to say that 5G will cause illness and death”.

She added: “It is clear from the independent science that parents will lose children and children will lose parents.

“It is an outdated myth that non-ionising radiation is safe; it is not.

“Microwave radiation from existing mobile networks has been found in thousands of peer-reviewed studies to cause harm to health, including neurological effects, nervous system issues and cancer.

“Several recent large-scale studies have shown that mobile radiation causes fatal brain and heart cancer; a proper look at the data also shows that brain gliomas in England - the type associated with mobile radiation - have doubled in the last twenty years.

“Some of the most powerful and progressive cities in the world, such as Brussels and parts of Geneva, have banned 5G for health reasons.

“Bristol should be looking to them and to the experts in human radiation effects, and not to our fractured, insecure government, for guidance.”

A separate petition against 5G, signed by 235 scientists and doctors across the world, warns the network will "massively increase" people's exposure to mobile phone radiation they say could cause cancer.

But Head of radiation dosimetry at Public Health England (PHE), Simon Mann, said: “It is possible that there may be a small increase in overall exposure to radio waves when 5G is added to an existing telecommunications network or in a new area.

“However, the overall exposure is expected to remain low relative to guidelines and as such there should be no consequences for public health.”

A PHE spokesman added the body is committed to making sure 5G radio waves comply with International Committee on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines.

He said PHE will update its advice “should new evidence dictate that is necessary”.

A Vodafone spokesperson said: “The radio frequencies used for 5G in the UK are similar to the ones currently used for 4G services. Where 4G uses frequencies between 800 MHz and 2.6GHz, 5G uses frequencies between 3.4GHz and 3.6GHz.”
Click here to view the source article.
Source: Bristol Live, Kate Wilson, 05 Sep 2019

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